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View Full Version : What is the suicide grip?



dxiw
03-03-2004, 09:06 PM
i read in some rules for a contest that no suicide grip on bench was allowed - what the heck is that??

Max-Mex
03-03-2004, 09:40 PM
maybe open palm, thumb not wrapped around.

EDIT: Just did a search on google. Thumb not wrapped around bar. Very dangerous way to bench.

thanky0ujesus
03-03-2004, 09:44 PM
its when you dont have your thumb wrapped around the bar opposite of your fingers... a thumbless grip. they call it this because you increase the chances of letting the bar slip off your hands and potentially land on your chest

biggimp
03-03-2004, 09:59 PM
yeah but some people can lift 10 pounds more with it. i know i can bench a lot easier with suicide grip, dont know if its mental or what.

Max-Mex
03-03-2004, 09:59 PM
mental

thanky0ujesus
03-04-2004, 12:24 AM
:withstupi

mental

whats the placement of a thumb gonna do for your chest.. unless it causes you to push it up in a different path. besides, 10 lbs isn't worth the added risk

Budiak
03-04-2004, 12:31 AM
I think its mental. It is mentally a better way to push an object. Push against a wall. Your thumb isnt opposed to the rest of your fingers. I bench with a suicide grip when doing reps...when I go to higher weights I usually wrap the thumb around. If that makes any sense.

Max-Mex
03-04-2004, 04:47 AM
Or doing pushups. It's how your body naturally sets it's hands. If you think about it, the bench press is odd because when we normally push something, usually our body is being pushed away (we use most of our body to stabilize). Most of the time, we don't grip like we do in the bench. I hope that made sense.

ElPietro
03-04-2004, 09:15 AM
I don't think that grip is all that dangerous, but I know my bench dropped quite a bit when I switched to a closed grip. It's generaly the required grip for any bench or plifting competition. Not sure if it was just having to get used to it or not, but I don't use an open grip anymore since it's not legal in the fed I want to at some point compete in.

ItalianGalleon
03-04-2004, 09:29 AM
Both dave tate and pavel the russian guy advocate squeezing the heck out of the bar when benching, which would be hard to do with an open grip, so I don't know how beneficial the open grip is.

xxr79xx
03-04-2004, 09:38 AM
:withstupi

mental

whats the placement of a thumb gonna do for your chest.. unless it causes you to push it up in a different path. besides, 10 lbs isn't worth the added risk

Thumb placement not much, however wrist placement a big difference! When most people bench with out the thumb wrapped over there wrist is cocked back where as you can put more weight on your arm however this is hard on the wrist will most likely develop some kind of wrist pain.

Darracq
03-04-2004, 11:56 AM
I use the thumbless grip, always have, My wrists hurt if i wrap it around the bar.

Maki Riddington
03-04-2004, 10:31 PM
I've found that using this grip makes me a lot stronger in my bench.

xxr79xx
03-05-2004, 05:53 AM
I use the thumbless grip, always have, My wrists hurt if i wrap it around the bar.

I would high recommend you ask a professional on correct bench tech. After you learn the right why you will get weaker at first but then you will get way strong then before.

WannabeSmalljjk
03-05-2004, 05:39 PM
I would high recommend you ask a professional on correct bench tech. After you learn the right why you will get weaker at first but then you will get way strong then before.

Ask a professional? Professional bencher(haha), or some a personal trainer at the local fitness center? LOL funny.... There is no 'right way' to each his own

When you squeeze the bar you use your forearms more, like when you pull the bar apart you use tri's more. Anyone use a reverse grip palms in the opposite direction? just curious

Bruise Brubaker
03-05-2004, 10:01 PM
Do you guys have interesting ways to prevent the backward bending of the wrist? I noticed that my left wrist seems to bend more than my right one (left arm is weaker). I get a little pain there when benching.

I haven't done wrist curl in a very very long time, but last time I had done them I had a weird feeling in my wrist, it was like if it was dislocating and coming back in place.

phreak
03-06-2004, 02:46 AM
Ask a professional? Professional bencher(haha), or some a personal trainer at the local fitness center? LOL funny.... There is no 'right way' to each his own
I beg to differ. When using a normal grip correctly (something very few people do) it is possible to get the forearm directly in line with the bar. This is impossible with a suicide grip, as it would by definition fall out of your hand.

Grab the bar with a normal grip. Rotate hands outward until the bar rests directly over the wrist (see image; dotted line = wrong, solid line = correct, circle = area with greatest load).

http://members.chello.nl/rkramers/grip.jpg


And just in case anyone wonders: yes, tucking the elbows in is still possible, even when the hands are rotated out to this degree.

bill
03-06-2004, 08:11 AM
I beg to differ. When using a normal grip correctly (something very few people do) it is possible to get the forearm directly in line with the bar. This is impossible with a suicide grip, as it would by definition fall out of your hand.

Grab the bar with a normal grip. Rotate hands outward until the bar rests directly over the wrist (see image; dotted line = wrong, solid line = correct, circle = area with greatest load).

http://members.chello.nl/rkramers/grip.jpg


And just in case anyone wonders: yes, tucking the elbows in is still possible, even when the hands are rotated out to this degree.

Phreak does this increase strength in the bench and is it more beneficial for building the pecs, a friend of mine use to bench without a bend in the wrist and claimed it really helped him i tried and can't do it?

PeteO
03-06-2004, 10:09 AM
stop obsessing about the grip. Do what feel right/comfortable to you. Grip it and rip it.............

phreak
03-07-2004, 06:06 AM
Phreak does this increase strength in the bench and is it more beneficial for building the pecs, a friend of mine use to bench without a bend in the wrist and claimed it really helped him i tried and can't do it?
Well, it doesn't increase strength, but when done correctly it prevents wrist bend. This in turn causes less pain and a more stable movement. So I wouldn't say that it makes you lift more, but rather that the other way may make you lift less. As for building pecs more: that is more a question of elbow positioning. With the grip I mentioned it feels more normal to let the elbows flare out. But this is often not desirable (greater risk of pec injury), so just tuck them anyway.

bill
03-07-2004, 06:38 AM
Well, it doesn't increase strength, but when done correctly it prevents wrist bend. This in turn causes less pain and a more stable movement. So I wouldn't say that it makes you lift more, but rather that the other way may make you lift less. As for building pecs more: that is more a question of elbow positioning. With the grip I mentioned it feels more normal to let the elbows flare out. But this is often not desirable (greater risk of pec injury), so just tuck them anyway.

Beast
03-08-2004, 03:40 PM
I always use suicide grip for benching. Once you get used to it you really don't worry about the bar sliding off, because it is pretty improbable. I started using the grip because bench pressing used to really irritate my wrists. Using suicide grip made my wrists never get agitated again. :thumbup:

thanky0ujesus
03-08-2004, 07:54 PM
i just tried suicide grip today. felt weird, felt like my thumb didn't belong there. i'll just keep with the standard grip, never had a problem with it before. guess its a matter of preference

Budiak
03-10-2004, 02:27 AM
I've found that the suicide grip requires a good amount of chalk.


I also use the suicide grip on skulls, JM press, Military press, and I use a thumbless grip when using a pronated grip for rows and pulldowns. I dont know. I just like it more.

It makes me feel...special.