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carlossalsa8
03-09-2004, 03:33 PM
can you please named the good fats. Why are they needed for and how much of those fats should I eat.

etwa
03-09-2004, 03:54 PM
omega 3 and omega 6! needed in the diet so your body releases fat stores. Your individual needs will be in relation to your total calorie requirements. I try to keep my fat intake at 20% of my total calories. So if your taking in 1000 calories a day 20% of that is 200 calories of fat. 1 gram of fat has 7 calories so that is 28.57 grams of fat per day. I eat alot of fish! some red meat, avocado, nuts and eggs. Alot of lifters supplement with Udo's and flaxseed oil.

Eat your fat!

geoffgarcia
03-09-2004, 03:56 PM
etwa, welcome to the board. you nailed it.

carlossalsa8
03-09-2004, 04:22 PM
omega 3 and omega 6! needed in the diet so your body releases fat stores. Your individual needs will be in relation to your total calorie requirements. I try to keep my fat intake at 20% of my total calories. So if your taking in 1000 calories a day 20% of that is 200 calories of fat. 1 gram of fat has 7 calories so that is 28.57 grams of fat per day. I eat alot of fish! some red meat, avocado, nuts and eggs. Alot of lifters supplement with Udo's and flaxseed oil.

Eat your fat!


where can I find these kind of fats ( omega 3 and 6) and how much I should eat. I heard nuts are healthy fats, but what kind of nuts, salty?

etwa
03-09-2004, 04:47 PM
Geoff- Thanks for the welcome! it looks like you've been busy! (ripped pictures)

Carlos- My list of fats are where you find them in whole foods or you can go to a nutritional store or buy online! UDOS is a good omega 6 oil, Flaxseed you can get anywhere! I don't know your diet but if you use the example and plug in your numbers you can figure it out. Nuts in moderation! No Salt! I use non-salted almonds very sparingly. Mostly in tuna and oats.

Strider2
03-09-2004, 04:48 PM
omega 3 and omega 6! needed in the diet so your body releases fat stores. Your individual needs will be in relation to your total calorie requirements. I try to keep my fat intake at 20% of my total calories. So if your taking in 1000 calories a day 20% of that is 200 calories of fat. 1 gram of fat has 7 calories so that is 28.57 grams of fat per day. I eat alot of fish! some red meat, avocado, nuts and eggs. Alot of lifters supplement with Udo's and flaxseed oil.

Eat your fat!

Just so you know, fat has 9 calories per gram.

carlossalsa8
03-09-2004, 05:00 PM
Geoff- Thanks for the welcome! it looks like you've been busy! (ripped pictures)

Carlos- My list of fats are where you find them in whole foods or you can go to a nutritional store or buy online! UDOS is a good omega 6 oil, Flaxseed you can get anywhere! I don't know your diet but if you use the example and plug in your numbers you can figure it out. Nuts in moderation! No Salt! I use non-salted almonds very sparingly. Mostly in tuna and oats.

Thanks. I eat clean and everything, but I do not eat that much fat ( proly 20 g, from the foods I eat, like chicken, rice, cereals, fruits vegetables...)and I ve heard good fats are needed, but how would you burn fat when you are eating more fat ( omega 3 and 6)?

raniali
03-09-2004, 05:00 PM
essential fats to consume
fish oil caps (since i refuse to eat that much fish)
flax or Udos oil

ok fats to consume
peanut butter
nuts
avocados
olive or coconut oil

raniali
03-09-2004, 05:02 PM
read this: http://www.wannabebig.com/article.php?articleid=61

Shao-LiN
03-09-2004, 05:04 PM
It seems you're working under the assumption that any and all fat that you consume stays in your body as fat stores. That isn't the case. Burning fat is almost a separate issue than the consumption of it. The burning of fat has more to do with calorie expenditure. Fat eaten does not equal fat stored.

etwa
03-09-2004, 05:07 PM
Thanks for the correction Strider! I usually just let fitday do my calculations.

1 fat gram = 9 calories

carlossalsa8
03-09-2004, 05:28 PM
It seems you're working under the assumption that any and all fat that you consume stays in your body as fat stores. That isn't the case. Burning fat is almost a separate issue than the consumption of it. The burning of fat has more to do with calorie expenditure. Fat eaten does not equal fat stored.

I don't eat that much fat. I play soccer and my diet consist of carbs mostly. I barely eat 20 to 30 gr of fat. Since carbs give energy when running, does that means fat isn't being burned? I mean many people say to me to eat more fat, but I didn't know what kind of fat to eat ( now I know). You say fat eaten does not equal fat stored. I do lots of running and sprints, but fat doesn't seem to get burn. Does that mean that in order to burn the fat stored, I should eat the essential fats, or more fat?

Shao-LiN
03-09-2004, 06:45 PM
A balance of all nutrients is good. But what it comes down to, basically, is burning more calories than you take in. If you're trying to lose weight, a diet consisting of mostly carbs isn't a method I would choose, personally. I would aim more for a 40% protein, 30% fat, 30% carbohydrate macronutrient breakdown.

Pay attention to your calories. Just because you're doing cardio doesn't really mean you're going to be burning a lot of fat. The cardio more or less helps burn more calories, which, in turn, helps you lose weight. From what I read, though, HIIT (High Intensity Interval Training) helps in mobilizing fat stores or something to that effect. I haven't really read much into the mechanics of its fat burning properties, so you'd be better off running a search for the details.

carlossalsa8
03-09-2004, 07:31 PM
A balance of all nutrients is good. But what it comes down to, basically, is burning more calories than you take in. If you're trying to lose weight, a diet consisting of mostly carbs isn't a method I would choose, personally. I would aim more for a 40% protein, 30% fat, 30% carbohydrate macronutrient breakdown.

Pay attention to your calories. Just because you're doing cardio doesn't really mean you're going to be burning a lot of fat. The cardio more or less helps burn more calories, which, in turn, helps you lose weight. From what I read, though, HIIT (High Intensity Interval Training) helps in mobilizing fat stores or something to that effect. I haven't really read much into the mechanics of its fat burning properties, so you'd be better off running a search for the details.

I don't wanna lose muscles while dooing lots of cardio ( practice 5 days a week, run for an hour 4 days a week, two of those day practice is at a highhhh intensity) I need carbs to recover energy. I usually eat 250 to 300 g of carbs, 80 to 100 g of pro and 20 to 30 g of fat. You are saying that eating carbs won't be a good idea to lose weight right? why would you say that?

Shao-LiN
03-09-2004, 11:41 PM
Well, to begin, I'd say you're eating too many carbs, not enough protein and not enough fat. You'll recover energy fine with a 40/30/30. The determining factors in how much muscle you lose or don't lose is adequate protein intake, regular weight training, and sufficient calories (don't overdo it and starve yourself, pretty much).