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Dedicated
03-15-2004, 12:13 AM
Is it bad to drink tons of milk? I have been drinking 4-6 cups a day. I read somewhere on these boards a while ago a thread that said that too much milk could have really bad long term effects. Anyone know what this is about?

KkKk
03-15-2004, 12:29 AM
you can die of heart attacks..

Dedicated
03-15-2004, 12:33 AM
you can die of heart attacks..
Ack why?

I searched google for it and all that came up was breastfeeding links lol.

Spartacus
03-15-2004, 01:04 AM
4-6 cups a day is fine.

and, i have no idea what you mean by heart attacks, unless you are drinking whole milk, in which case the saturated fat might be too much depending on the rest of your diet.

Exnor
03-15-2004, 01:37 AM
http://www.notmilk.com/

Spartacus
03-15-2004, 09:22 PM
http://www.notmilk.com/


lol.

aka23
03-16-2004, 02:01 PM
Is it bad to drink tons of milk? I have been drinking 4-6 cups a day. I read somewhere on these boards a while ago a thread that said that too much milk could have really bad long term effects. Anyone know what this is about?

I think milk is healthy and desirable beverage when consumed in moderate quantities. I eat cereal with milk twice per day and usually include milk in my post workout meals. Some people can consume large quantities without negative effects. Others have problems with very small quantities. Some possible issues are:

1. As many as 60 million Americans may be lactose intolerant. This is especially common among certain ethnic groups such as African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans. Millions of other people are not lactose intolerant, but would run into problems with large quantities of dairy products, such as 6 cups per day. I have problems with more than 2 cups in a sitting.

2. The primary carb in milk is lactose. Lactose is a disaccharide composed of glucose and galactose. Like fructose galactose primarily refills liver glycogen instead of muscle glycogen and is associated with various other negative effects in large quantities. I find it interesting that some bodybuilders worry about consuming small quantities of fructose in fruit while at the same time consuming much larger quantities of galactose in milk. Note that refilling liver glycogen is not necessarily a bad thing as liver glycogen levels are one of the body’s key anabolic/catabolic state signals.

3. Dairy products like milk produce a large insulin response. This is somewhat surprising since these same dairy products have a low GI value. More information about the differences between the II (insulin index) and GI (glycemic index) can be found at http://www.mendosa.com/insulin_index.htm

4. Milk is a common food allergy. It is probably the most common food allergy for Americans.

5. Some types of milk products (not skim milk) contain good amounts of saturated fat.

6. Large quantities may replace valuable nutrients from other foods. For example you may get calories from milk, instead of vegetables. In addition large quantities may result in a poorly balanced diet (too much of one mineral, not enough of another...). Vitamin A/D fortification can present negative issues in large quantities.

7. Various risks may be associated with milk production methods -- http://www.mercola.com/article/milk/no_milk.htm , http://www.mercola.com/2000/sept/10/milk_cancer.htm

8. Large quantities may increase risk of certain cancers (some studies suggest there is no such link) and a number of other diseases in persons who are prone to them.

pusher
03-16-2004, 02:53 PM
MIlk is fo Bahbees:D

RickTheDestroyer
03-16-2004, 03:29 PM
Wow, my daily pus cell intake comes to an average of a delicious 687,960,000 cells daily.
MMmmmm.

Max-Mex
03-16-2004, 03:42 PM
Millions of other people are not lactose intolerant, but would run into problems with large quantities of dairy products, such as 6 cups per day. I have problems with more than 2 cups in a sitting.

As a kid (until I was about 18), my brother and I went through about 5 gallons a week in whole milk. I can go through a gallon of milk easily in 1 day if I desired. I guess I'm one of the millions. :D


A few things about me that may be effects of large milk consumption:

1. I've only broken 1 bone in my entire life (hairline type fracture). I didn't play contact sports, but I was a fairly active kid and had my share of bumps and bruises.

2. Never had a cavity (was never really good at rememebering to floss and brush).


Now, I'm not saying milk was soley responsible for this because I'm sure other factors are involved, but I do think milk did play an important role.

Max-Mex
03-16-2004, 03:47 PM
http://www.notmilk.com/

Theses guys are probably just pissed cause they can't drink it.


Just hook me up with an IV to a cow. I'll be all set.

BTW, my wife's cousin is a dairy farmer. I went to visit...I was in heaven.

ogarchamplin
03-16-2004, 04:16 PM
4-6 cups a day is fine.

and, i have no idea what you mean by heart attacks, unless you are drinking whole milk, in which case the saturated fat might be too much depending on the rest of your diet.



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

By Robert Cohen Executive Director


= Heart Disease



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Heart disease is America's number one killer. Most American's and scientific agencies are in agreement: Saturated animal fat and cholesterol do not do the heart any good. According to USDA figures, each day, the average American eats just 5 ounces of meat and chicken containing saturated fat and cholesterol, and 29.2 ounces of milk and dairy products (666 pounds per American) containing the same dangerous factors. The following nine studies are a confirmation to milk's link to heart disease:




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"Milk and milk products gave the highest correlation coefficient to heart disease, while sugar, animal proteins and animal fats came in second, third, and fourth, respectively."

A Survey of Mortality Rates and Food Consumption Statistics of 24 Countries, Medical Hypothesis 7:907-918, 1981




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"More patients who had suffered a myocardial infarction had elevated levels of antibodies against milk proteins than was found in a comparable group of patients without coronary heart disease."

Davies, Antibodies and Myocardial Infarction, The Lancet, ii: 205-207, 1980




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"Milk consumption correlates positively with cholesterol levels in blood as well as coronary mortality. In comparisons between 17 countries, there is a good correlation between national cholesterol levels and mortality from ischaemic heart disease."

European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 48:305-325, 1994




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"Although studies point out strong negative correlations between wine consumption and heart disease... six countries with the highest mortality show no correlation at all. Finland ranks highest of all in milk consumption, wine consumption and mortality from heart disease."

The Lancet, I, 1017-1020, 1979




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"Milk and many components of milk (butterfat, milk protein, calcium from milk, and riboflavin)… were positively related to coronary heart disease mortality for all 40 countries studied."

Circulation 1993; 88(6):2771-2779




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"Greenland Eskimos, who have a very low incidence of ischemic heart disease, have a high-fat, high-protein diet, but a very low intake of milk."

British J of Preventive & Social Medicine, 1977




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"For ischemic heart disease milk carbohydrates were found to have the highest statistical association for males aged 35+ and females aged 65+. In the case coronary heart disease, non-fat milk was found to have the highest association for males aged 45+ and females aged 75+, while for females 65- 74, milk carbohydrates and sugar had the highest associations...animal proteins contribute to homocysteine production; however, milk more than meat lacks adequate B vitamins to convert homocysteine to useful products. Lactose and calcium in conjunction with homocysteine from consumption of non-fat milk may also contribute to calcification of the arteries."

Altern Med Rev, 1998 Aug, 3:4




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"Excessive milk consumption may adversely affect the circulation on account of the high calcium content of milk and because lactose promotes the intestinal absorption of calcium. Excessive calcium intake may cause calcification and rigidification of the large elastic arteries, which could be an important factor in causing myocardial ischaemia."

Med Hypotheses, 2000 May, 54:5




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"Animal food-groups were directly correlated to mortality from coronary heart disease, defined as sudden coronary death or fatal myocardial infarction and vegetable food-groups (except potatoes) as well as fish and alcohol were inversely correlated with CHD mortality. Univariate analysis showed significant positive correlation coefficients for butter (R = 0.887), meat (R = 0.645), pastries (R = 0.752), and milk (R = 0.600) consumption, and significant negative correlation coefficients for legumes (R = -0.822), oils (R = -0.571), and alcohol (R = -0.609) consumption. Combined vegetable foods (excluding alcohol) were inversely correlated (R = -0.519), whereas combined animal foods (excluding fish) were directly correlated (R = 0.798) with coronary heart disease death rates."

Eur J Epidemiol, 1999 Jul, 15:6, 507-15




--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

MILK AND HEART DISEASE

Heart disease is America's number one killer. Dairy products
represent America's number one food group.

Charles Attwood, M.D., once described to me the pint of
blood he had drawn from a patient. In the hour before
parting with his pint, the young man had eaten lunch at a
fast food restaurant, enjoying hamburgers, fries, and a
milkshake.

The blood was "murky and opaque," according to Dr. Attwood.
I will always remember that phrase and Attwood's further
descriptive imagery. After 15 minutes, a one-half inch layer
of fat had risen to the top of the plastic package
containing that blood.

In 1980, the British journal Lancet (ii: 205-207) reported:

"More patients who had suffered a myocardial infarction had
elevated levels of antibodies against milk proteins than was
found in a comparable group of patients without coronary
heart disease."

In 1994, the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition (48:305-
325) found:

"Milk consumption correlates positively with cholesterol
levels in blood as well as coronary mortality. In
comparisons between 17 countries, there is a good
correlation between national cholesterol levels and
mortality from ischaemic heart disease."

There is controversy regarding the "fat-connection" and
heart disease. Is it fat, or is it dairy, which also
contains fat? In 1977, the British Journal of Preventive &
Social Medicine noted:

"Greenland Eskimos, who have a very low incidence of
ischemic heart disease, have a high-fat, high-protein diet,
but a very low intake of milk."

The May, 2000 issue of Medical Hypothesis provided an
important clue as to how dairy compromises the heart:

"Excessive milk consumption may adversely affect the
circulation on account of the high calcium content of milk
and because lactose promotes the intestinal absorption of
calcium. Excessive calcium intake may cause calcification
and rigidification of the large elastic arteries, which
could be an important factor in causing myocardial
ischaemia."

This morning, I remembered Dr. Attwood's Blood sample
assessment while thumbing through a stack of reading
material on my desk. The Physician's Committee for
Responsible Medicine (PCRM) reports a second opinion that
confirms Dr. Attwood's observation.

The current issue of Good Medicine, PCRM's quarterly
journal, contains evidence that just one single meal
containing saturated animal fat can be harmful to the human
heart.

Neal Barnard, M.D., includes a column citing a study that
appeared in the Journal of American Cardiology (Nestel, PJ,
et, al., 2001; 37: 1929-35). PCRM reports:

"Australian researchers fed volunteers a ham and cheese
sandwich, a glass of whole milk, and a dish of ice cream.
Just hours later, their cholesterol levels were elevated,
and they experienced a 25-percent reduction in elasticity of
their arteries-both important risk factors of heart attack."

Was this experiment a fair assessment of America's favorite
fast-food meal?

PCRM reveals:

"The fat content of the experimental meal was 50 grams,
still well below that of a typical fast-food meal such as a
chicken sandwich and fries."


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Robert Cohen author of: MILK A-Z

(201-967-7001)
Executive Director (notmilkman@notmilk.com)
Dairy Education Board
http://www.notmilk.com


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Do you know of a friend or family member with one or more of these milk-related problems? Do them a huge favor and forward the URL or this entire file to them.

Do you know of someone who should read these newsletters? If so, have them send an empty Email to notmilk-subscribe@yahoogroups.com and they will receive it (automatically)!

Dedicated
03-16-2004, 06:49 PM
Thanks for all the info. What about milk and prostate cancer?

Max-Mex
03-16-2004, 06:54 PM
I'm gonna die with a glass of milk in my hand!

:p

Dedicated
03-16-2004, 06:55 PM
I'm gonna die with a glass of milk in my hand!

:p
ROFL:D

HemiVision
03-16-2004, 09:37 PM
MIlk is fo Bahbees:D

When you grow ahp you have to drink bee-ah

ReturnedFire
03-16-2004, 09:41 PM
i used to drink alot of milk, like at every meal, but then i stopped cuz i got scared of all the antibiotics and nasty stuff they do to the cows, like feed them ground up cows and crap. i've been drinking soy milk, and i've gotten used to it.

pusher
03-16-2004, 10:57 PM
I'd actually be worried about the long term effects of extra IGF-1 from r-BGH treated cows wrt cancers, somatic cells and antibiotics are the other thing.

Spartacus
03-17-2004, 12:02 AM
you mean like how huuuge all those hormones will make you?

oh wait, the levels are minute.

i'm not going to go through all those studies, they're generally very vague and so not applicable to those who consume large quantities of milk in the context of a good diet, not specfic to whole milk and butter or low-fat, or just laughable, like saying milk is bad becuase it has calcium in it.

pusher
03-17-2004, 10:40 AM
Congratulations, you have just proved your ignorance on the matter. That is all.

Allie
03-17-2004, 12:14 PM
Everyone should have 3 servings a day (food pyramid) I will let you know I have enough milk each day for 2-3 people though. Since I don;t eat a lot of meat milk is way of getting some protein. That and milk prices have bottomed out, support dairy farmers :)

Spartacus
03-17-2004, 01:41 PM
Congratulations, you have just proved your ignorance on the matter. That is all.

that was a constructive post. :shoot:

NateWheeler
03-17-2004, 02:21 PM
When I was younger (around 6-13) I drank about 3-5 glasses of milk a day, thats all I would ever drink was that (and coke, unfortunately. For the last three years I havent drank soda :) )

I guess I drank it so much I got sick of it, cause im now down to 1, maybe 2 glasses a day, plus the milk I put in my cereal, protein shakes, etc.

All in all, I dont believe drinking 3-5 glasses a day is that bad at all, ESPECIALLY when your younger (6-20) because those are the active years and whatnot. I think milk is very healthy and almost essential as it has many proteins and vitamins in it, although if your inactive or older I suggest low fat milk.

And like someone else already said, I have never broken a bone in my body, and im a very active kid, even more so when I was younger (football, lacrosse, soccer)