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View Full Version : Kashi helps during a cut?



Dedicated
03-25-2004, 02:02 PM
I bought some Kashi cereal, it's really high in dietary fiber, which is supposed to be really healthy. My question is, does dietary fiber help during a cut?

Edit - Also it's broken down into soluble and insoluble, do any of these have benefits for someone trying to shed some fat?

fit4firsttime
03-25-2004, 05:42 PM
fiber counteracts carb intake, if your total carb intake is 25 grams,and your dailey fiber intake is 20 grams, your net carb intake is 5 grams. this is just an example. i always look at the fiber content compared to carb content.

jugheadkills
03-26-2004, 12:18 AM
i love kashi... fiber is good.. beans are good... drink moar water... no pasta....

Jasonl
03-26-2004, 07:35 AM
... no pasta....
There is nothing wrong with pasta, especially whole grain.

galileo
03-26-2004, 09:16 AM
Fiber doesn't "counteract" carb intake. It is merely not counted towards your total carb calories for the day.

I'd say more fiber helps, but there is a give and take with the milk you've added (sugars) and the entire contents of the cereal. I admittedly use Kashi Heart to Heart from time to time while cutting and it isn't that big of a deal. I also use carb-counters milk because it doesn't taste too bad when on cereal and only has a few grams of carbs.

AllUp
03-26-2004, 10:40 AM
Fiber doesn't "counteract" carb intake. It is merely not counted towards your total carb calories for the day.


:withstupi

As for the Kashi in general, The fiber seems to make me feel full. Good Filler IMHO.

geoffgarcia
03-26-2004, 11:03 AM
Dietary fiber be it soluble from psyllium or oat bran, insoluble fiber from wheat bran or peelings & stalks of fruits or vegetables or from a fiber supplement. They are very important to our digestive health & the health of our body as a whole.

When you increase fiber in your diet you must increase water consumption!

Insoluble Fiber:
Insoluble fiber doesn't dissolve in water & passes through your digestive system largely unchanged. Insoluble fiber is found in greatest amounts in cereals, wheat bran, & stalks & peels of fruits & vegetables.

Insoluble fiber accelerates intestinal transit, increases fecal weight, slows starch hydrolysis, & delays glucose absorption.This means softer, larger feces. It also results in an increased frequency of defecation. As the feces move through your intestine they scour intestinal walls & remove waste matter.(3)

Soluble Fiber:
Soluble fiber dissolves in water & is degraded by bacteria in your colon. This type of fiber is found in fruits, oats, barley, psyllium & some beans.

Soluble fiber also increases stool volume & stool water content.(4) It is believed that soluble fiber does this in a different manner than that done my insoluble fiber.

Soluble fiber forms a gel in your intestines which regulates the flow of waste material through your digestive tract. Soluble fiber slows stomach emptying time delaying absorption of glucose from your blood stream & has been shown to lower cholesterol.(1)
http://www.libby.org/nutrition/herbalfiberblend/soluble.htm

Dedicated
03-26-2004, 03:41 PM
Excellent post geoff thanks.

Galileo, yea, the sugars don't help. That is interesting about that milk you suggest. Currently I drink powdered milk because it is alot cheaper and I can use one serving to make 2-3 cups of milk, this makes it go a long way and I eat less calories this way. I'll look into that milk you suggested though.

galileo
03-26-2004, 03:56 PM
Excellent post geoff thanks.

Galileo, yea, the sugars don't help. That is interesting about that milk you suggest. Currently I drink powdered milk because it is alot cheaper and I can use one serving to make 2-3 cups of milk, this makes it go a long way and I eat less calories this way. I'll look into that milk you suggested though.

If cost is your concern, then you're not going to like the price of the low-carb milk one bit. I believe it is in the realm of $3.50-$4.00 per half-gallon. I use it sparingly and since I am essentially lactose intolerant, it seems to work as well as the lactose-free types for the same cost. Plus, it is higher in protein (12g per serving vs. 8g in real milk). Not too bad.

Saint Patrick
03-26-2004, 04:29 PM
You could always just eat it out of a cup without milk.

bjones56
03-26-2004, 04:33 PM
Does fiber decrease the absorption of protein, and perhaps allow more of it to be pooped out?

Dedicated
03-26-2004, 06:27 PM
St Patty, yea I could always do that heh.

Galileo, yea way too expensive, thanks for the info though.

ogarchamplin
03-26-2004, 08:22 PM
If cost is your concern, then you're not going to like the price of the low-carb milk one bit. I believe it is in the realm of $3.50-$4.00 per half-gallon. I use it sparingly and since I am essentially lactose intolerant, it seems to work as well as the lactose-free types for the same cost. Plus, it is higher in protein (12g per serving vs. 8g in real milk). Not too bad.

Man what part of the states do you live in? i get the CarbCoutdown milk for 2.15 a half gallon here

galileo
03-26-2004, 09:04 PM
Man what part of the states do you live in? i get the CarbCoutdown milk for 2.15 a half gallon here
I live in the western portion of your state, bucko. ;)

Anubis
03-27-2004, 12:58 AM
Forget dry ceral, put some water on it. :p