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Relentless
04-14-2004, 08:04 AM
I had heard anecdotally that pan-frying (no butter... just a nonstick pan) brown rice would cook off or somehow transform the rice, limiting and in fact mostly eliminating the carbohydrates in the rice.

I tried it, and it seems to have had some effect -- the water didn't even get cloudy when I boiled the rice later.

Does anyone have knowledge about the effects of doing this to rice before you boil it?

I have also read something before about the length of time you cook certain starches having an impact on the GI rating for that carb... basically that undercooked or overcooked pasta has a higher GI rating than pasta cooked for a certain length of time...

AllUp
04-14-2004, 08:28 AM
I had heard anecdotally that pan-frying (no butter... just a nonstick pan) brown rice would cook off or somehow transform the rice, limiting and in fact mostly eliminating the carbohydrates in the rice.

I tried it, and it seems to have had some effect -- the water didn't even get cloudy when I boiled the rice later.

Does anyone have knowledge about the effects of doing this to rice before you boil it?

I have also read something before about the length of time you cook certain starches having an impact on the GI rating for that carb... basically that undercooked or overcooked pasta has a higher GI rating than pasta cooked for a certain length of time...

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=1021998

"Hydrothermal processing results in significant changes occurring individual sugars of the grit. During culinary treatment these changes are levelled out, but in the end the level of virtually all types of sugar is higher in the gruel cooked with hydrothermally treated grit than in that prepared with initial, untreated grit."

This can be why it seems to be cleaner w/no butter/spray.

As for the cooking time I've heard something similar. It has to do with the gelatinization of the product while cooking, the heat applied as well as the fermentation of the bacteria in the colon I think.

hemants
04-14-2004, 09:24 AM
Can someone translate that into english?

Does pre-cooking the rice result in more or less sugar content?