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View Full Version : Can you convert a HIIT program using a heart monitor??



mustang331
05-27-2004, 01:23 PM
Meaning it does not only have to be jogging/sprinting...

If I want to try it on a bike, or stairs, or anything!

Would it be like 30 seconds of 90% MHR, and then 70% or so for 2 min. and then do it all over again??

gopher
05-28-2004, 02:20 AM
Yes you can do HIIT on a bike, stair master, or any other form of cardio equipment for that matter and you can throw out the heart rate monitor. It does not matter if you are running or using a piece of cardio equipment the sprint is suposed to be an all out 100% effort. You don't need a monitor to tell you how hard to push because you should be going as hard as you possibly can.
I like to use my Schwinn Airdyne for my HIIT workouts. After a 5 minute warm up I do 30 second all out sprints followed by 30 seconds at a pace slightly less than I would use for a normal 30 minute session on the bike. After about 5 or 6 intervals the 30 second resting interval is not enough for me to get my heart down out of my throat so I go to 30 second sprints and 60 second resting intervals. After about 7 or 8 of these I go for 30/90 intervals. The idea is to push yourself as hard as possible. If you are able to read a heart rate monitor and make calculations as you go you are not working hard enough IMHO. Just get on that bike, track, stairmaster, rower or whatever and give it everything you've got.

mustang331
05-28-2004, 07:42 AM
Gotcha! Thx

mustang331
05-28-2004, 07:43 AM
Ya think HIIT ON a bike is as good as HIIT running?

geoffgarcia
05-28-2004, 08:38 AM
Ya think HIIT ON a bike is as good as HIIT running?
no way

Augury
05-28-2004, 09:39 AM
no way

i dont have a clue to the answer either way...so im just curious (as ever) as to the reasoning? I thought it was all about heart rate as opposed to method of transport (legs or pedals). If you are working 100% on a bike isnt that the same as 100% on your feet?

I bow to experience tho...I havent tried HITT yet (will be soon) and i dont want to be wasting my time. I hate jogging and love cycling through nearby forest...so answer is rather important to my mental health :)

Augs

geoffgarcia
05-28-2004, 09:48 AM
i dont have a clue to the answer either way...so im just curious (as ever) as to the reasoning? I thought it was all about heart rate as opposed to method of transport (legs or pedals). If you are working 100% on a bike isnt that the same as 100% on your feet?

I bow to experience tho...I havent tried HITT yet (will be soon) and i dont want to be wasting my time. I hate jogging and love cycling through nearby forest...so answer is rather important to my mental health :)

Augs
its my experience that it takes to long to get to 100% on any type of machine, be it treadmill, bike, or eliptical or whatever.
It is possible to get to prime heart rate, just not within a fast enough time, not to mention getting to such a fast level is in most cases exceeding the speeds those devices are designed to be used at (even if you have the difficulty level set appropriately)
I saw a guy on an eliptical doing a super fast "sprint" I moved down about 3 machines because I thought he might fall and break his neck and I didn't want to be in the way of the medics:)

Also I believe I read that ideal for HIIT is 6s on, or maybe 9?

I think HIIT has more than just heart rate which makes is allegedly successful. A full blown 100m spring isn't going to make your heart rate skyrocket..it'll go up, but not for a few seconds into your run...and then your done before it even gets to high and again it starts to come down.

I wouldn't be surprised if any HIIT benefit is tied to the yoyo of the atp cycle which might provide a longer boost in metabolism similar to a typical cardio interval workout.
Just a theory:)

aka23
05-28-2004, 10:09 AM
The majority of studies I have seen that found benefits to HIIT were done on cycling machines and were not done at 100% intensity. Having said that, it is easier for most persons to reach a higher HR while sprinting than while cycling, and most persons have a higher peak HR while sprinting than while cycling.

Some of the possible reasons why HIIT is effective for fat loss are:
1. Calories used both during the session and after it is complete through increased metabolism + repair
2. Appetite suppression (increased less than predicted by calorie usage and less than lower intensity cardio)
3. AMPK activation during high intensity exercise and related lipid metabolism / nutrient partitioning adaptations
4. Increased fat as fuel and nutrient partititioning due to depleted glycogen reserves
5. Free fatty acid oxidation during recovery intervals
6. Hormonal changes

Different types of interval protocols optomize these different elements. Shorter intevals would be superior for AMPK activation, assuming all other things are equal, since ATP and creatine phospate usage as fuel dominates shorter sprints. While longer intervals (45+ seconds) would be superior for glycogen depletion, assuming all other things are equal since glycogen becomes the dominate source of fuel in longer intervals.

You do not need to work at 100% maximum intensity for any of these processes to occur. I recently read two studies which measured AMPK activation at various intensity of cardio. Low intensity aerobic cardio (40%VO2max) had no significant effect. 20 minutes of medium intensity (60%V02max) increased the alpha-2 isoform by 5x. 20 minutes of high intensity aerboic cardio (80%VO2max) increased the alpha-2 isoform by 8x. Note that intensities were incremented in a sequential workout. 30 second anaerobic sprints at 200%VO2max (HIIT) increased both the alpha-1 and alpha-2 isoforms by a factor of 2-3x, which is not significantly above the high-intensity aerobic cardio. Glycogen depeletion and most of the other activities in the list also occur to a significant extent with high-intensity aerobic cardio as well, depending on intensity and duration.