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swt_asian_soul
06-21-2004, 03:26 PM
I dunno where to get dextrose and malotroexe . I was just wondering if it's ok to consume fruit juice post workout since it is a simple carb.

T_Chapman
06-21-2004, 04:25 PM
I dunno where to get dextrose and malotroexe . I was just wondering if it's ok to consume fruit juice post workout since it is a simple carb.

i asked the same question a few days ago and they said its worse than not drinking anything at all.

Saint Patrick
06-21-2004, 04:32 PM
Fruit Juice = Fructose = Not ideal post workout.

reloaded
06-21-2004, 04:54 PM
Something like a banana is good for post workout. You don't necessarily have to have dextrose and malo. Just as long as you get a decent amount of protein and carbs afterward. I usually just drink a bunch of milk and eat a piece of chicken or banana or something.

geoffgarcia
06-21-2004, 05:31 PM
the benefit of a liquid post workout is that it will be digested faster than solid foods as it can be turned into chyme and passed to the duodenum and into the small intestine fairly quickly
so if ur going to eat a banana and chicken then don't feel there is any rush to eat it...its gonna take 3-6 hours to reach ur small intestines (assuming little fat)

for ultra fast absorption I believe a hydrolyzed product would have the advantage.
Most supplement companies put a small portion of this into their mixes although you can buy it seperately as well. A hydrolyzed powder would have a % that has been formulated into a molecular structure that is similar to digested state already, so it gets scooped up ultra quick (according to the theory)

there are hydrolyzed proteins and carbs

Maki Riddington
06-21-2004, 06:06 PM
Depending on the fruit you'll be fine. I'm so sick and tiered of hearing about how fructose is soooo bad for you.

Vido
06-21-2004, 06:56 PM
the benefit of a liquid post workout is that it will be digested faster than solid foods as it can be turned into chyme and passed to the duodenum and into the small intestine fairly quickly
so if ur going to eat a banana and chicken then don't feel there is any rush to eat it...its gonna take 3-6 hours to reach ur small intestines (assuming little fat)

This is true, but I don't think it is as big a deal as people make it out to be. Assuming you've eaten pre-workout you've already got food in your stomach anyway. If you're saying it takes 3-6 hours to reach your small intestines, then your pre-workout meal should be there by the time you're finished your workout.

geoffgarcia
06-21-2004, 07:47 PM
Assuming you've eaten pre-workout you've already got food in your stomach anyway. If you're saying it takes 3-6 hours to reach your small intestines, then your pre-workout meal should be there by the time you're finished your workout.
I would like to counter your assumption, with my assumption if I may *LOL*

its my impression that most people have lunch around noon
they leave work at 5-6
then I think quite a few stop at the gym on the way home (thus the packed gyms between 4-7pm)

Those 5-6 hours are enough to ensure that most lunch foods will have passed into your small intestine already.

Granted my assumption is as big as yours...

I think the amount of people that go home, eat a meal and then go to the gym is small...and those that do I would think might want to revisit their meal plan to get the most out of their post workout shake.(my opinion of course, not backed by anything)

What I choose to do is drink a smaller pre workout protein shake around 5 to fuel my 7pm workout...then a post workout shake later...

Also, I do believe that liquids circumvent solid foods and are processed quicker.

This is why if you have a HUGE meal, then gallon a gallon of water, ur going to urinate that water in 1-2 hours, but that meal will be with you for days...liquids zip through:)

fornero
06-21-2004, 07:54 PM
Fruit juice wouldn't really be all that bad. The sugars in fruit juice, contrary to popular belief, are not all fructose (many of the common ones end up being somewhere in the realm of 50/50). And some fructose is not a bad thing, even post-workout.

A better bet would be, as was suggested above, whole fruit. This will get you not only the sugars, but the starches (in some fruits) and phytonutrients as well. Bananas would probably be at the top of my list, and blend into shakes extremely well.

That being said, the whole fast digesting/liquid thing is absurdly overrated. Outside of specific situations (rapid rehydration/glycogen replenishment during some sort of event, or carb-loading towards supercompensation), there is going to be virtually no difference between a liquid meal and a whole food meal. The researcher that conducted the studies that the vast majority of post-workout advice is based upon has stated that it would likely take two years to see a measurable difference. Eating something you enjoy/that fills you and not stressing out over it will have a much bigger impact in the long run.

geoffgarcia
06-21-2004, 07:58 PM
The researcher that conducted the studies that the vast majority of post-workout advice is based upon has stated that it would likely take two years to see a measurable difference. Eating something you enjoy/that fills you and not stressing out over it will have a much bigger impact in the long run.
link

Vido
06-21-2004, 09:01 PM
I would like to counter your assumption, with my assumption if I may *LOL*

its my impression that most people have lunch around noon
they leave work at 5-6
then I think quite a few stop at the gym on the way home (thus the packed gyms between 4-7pm)

Those 5-6 hours are enough to ensure that most lunch foods will have passed into your small intestine already.

Granted my assumption is as big as yours...


Well, we're both making assumptions then, but as I see it most people on this board are (or are trying to) eat at least 4-6 meals/day. I would think that even someone who is working a 9-5 job would have a break in the afternoon to have a snack.

I don't think we're really disagreeing anyway. If you haven't had the chance to eat before the workout, then liquids would be better. If you do have food in your stomach though (as I'm assuming most would), then I don't think liquid vs. whole food really matters.

Maki Riddington
06-22-2004, 07:37 AM
I too would like to see that link to the "two year" statement.