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View Full Version : First documented human myostatin mutant (news)



jimlynch11
06-23-2004, 09:39 PM
http://cnn.aimtoday.cnn.com/news/story.jsp?idq=/ff/story/0001%2F20040623%2F2027180029.htm&sc=1500&photoid=20040623NY192

lucky son of a b****

Jasonl
06-23-2004, 09:58 PM
Future Ronnie.

reloaded
06-23-2004, 10:15 PM
Um...I want some. :)

Allenronm
06-23-2004, 10:29 PM
That's very very interesting.


Great read.

Gizotch
06-23-2004, 10:31 PM
lol , i was just about to start a new thread on that news blip but you beat me too it .

jimlynch11
06-23-2004, 10:42 PM
The article seems to indicate that products such as this (http://www.bulknutrition.com/?products_id=118) might have a future in the BB world...

any thoughts? any testimonials? gimmick?

BCC
06-23-2004, 11:12 PM
The article seems to indicate that products such as this (http://www.bulknutrition.com/?products_id=118) might have a future in the BB world...

any thoughts? any testimonials? gimmick?

Products like that DO NOT work. If they did, this news wouldn't be news.

MrWebb78
06-23-2004, 11:17 PM
gene mutation. we are now birthing the new X-Men team.

Spartan936
06-23-2004, 11:23 PM
I wonder how the baby will grow... sounds like he'll be absolutely huge unless they find some way to drug him not to be.

T_Chapman
06-23-2004, 11:29 PM
he is so lucky.

BCC
06-23-2004, 11:35 PM
I guess he's lucky. Although I know in the mice they mutated, their life expectancy was cut in half. Well not exactly expectancy, they just died really soon.

Airflight89
06-24-2004, 12:42 AM
Future Mr. Olympia Winner at age 6.

Davor
06-24-2004, 12:51 AM
Yea hes gonna be huge but something else will be all ****ed up probly

-sin-
06-24-2004, 02:20 AM
Only time will tell if his genetic mutation is a blessing or a curse. There have been genetic freaks like this before. Robert Pershing Wadlow (http://www.altonweb.com/history/wadlow/) comes to mind..

phreak
06-24-2004, 03:00 AM
I'm thinking Paul Anderson might have had a touch of this.

rapidshoter
06-24-2004, 04:49 AM
lol , i was just about to start a new thread on that news blip but you beat me too it .
I was gonna post that same thing.

http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=514&e=7&u=/ap/20040624/ap_on_he_me/mighty_muscle_gene

He's not going to live long :(

NateDogg
06-24-2004, 06:10 AM
The article seems to indicate that products such as this (http://www.bulknutrition.com/?products_id=118) might have a future in the BB world...

any thoughts? any testimonials? gimmick?

Actually, the article stated outright that products like that are useless and could be dangerous.

TBone4Eva
06-24-2004, 07:00 AM
He's not going to live long :(
Hmm, I guess it will depend on how his mutation will affect his heart. If it doesn't increase the size of his heart than he may well live a full life. It seems the mutation only gives him the ability to build muscle easily, but to get really huge the nutrition would still need to be there.

meltedtime
06-24-2004, 07:00 AM
Actually, the article stated outright that products like that are useless and could be dangerous.

Don't mess with this crap. Read the full advertisement ad (http://www.bulknutrition.com/?products_id=118) and you will see that they make absolutely no claims that their product works or that it is safe. They constantly cite one study done on mice. One study on mice and no offer no proof that their product works at all. In fact they are asking people to enroll to be guinea pigs. Don't be a fool. Stay away until a little more empirical research has been conducted.

melt

Relentless
06-24-2004, 07:25 AM
almost seems like it'd take all the fun out of training if it made things too easy with myostatin blockers...

Gyno Rhino
06-24-2004, 07:31 AM
He'll probably be dead before 20.

As "cool" as it may seem, it's not the way the body intended to work.

GonePostal
06-24-2004, 07:47 AM
Yeah... nature has a way of balancing out... Like the super smart kids always die early :(

ElPietro
06-24-2004, 08:19 AM
I guess you have a long life to look forward to then eh? :D :p j/k

Slick 25
06-24-2004, 08:31 AM
The kid already has problems. Look at how his feet look. Hes not gonna look the way most of you think he will. He is definitely not the lucky bastard u are making him out to be. And I agree, he probably wont live very long.

ElPietro
06-24-2004, 08:34 AM
But he's already got squatters ass! It's gonna be tough when he throws a tantrum in the sandbox during kindergarten. I pity the foo that messes with this jive turkey.

TBone4Eva
06-24-2004, 09:00 AM
But he's already got squatters ass! It's gonna be tough when he throws a tantrum in the sandbox during kindergarten. I pity the foo that messes with this jive turkey.
When he was in his terrible 2's phase he must have been very terrible indeed!

Obviously this kid is going to have some health problems, but i don't think you can just assume that he won't live for "very long". I also don't think he will have a BB physique though he may have one like a powerlifter's. Human physiology is so complex, the only thing we can really do is wait and see.

I wonder what puberty will do to his body.

MixmasterNash
06-24-2004, 09:42 AM
Great, just what the Germa psyche needs, a real ubermensch.

TBone4Eva
06-24-2004, 09:52 AM
Great, just what the Germa psyche needs, a real ubermensch.
You know, this kid is probably just what the Nazis would have wanted to show the world their superiority. Imagine Hitler fielding kids like this at the Olympics or the military, geez.

Holto
06-24-2004, 11:33 AM
all I can say is what are we doing to our world ?

how much do man-made chemicals (xenobiotics) play a role in this...

what precription filth did his mother take while she was pregnant ?

there were babies born in the 70's with flipper like arms because of a prescription drug that should have never been approved

we need to get control of big pharma and agri-business giants

Airflight89
06-24-2004, 11:44 AM
Only time will tell if his genetic mutation is a blessing or a curse. There have been genetic freaks like this before. Robert Pershing Wadlow (http://www.altonweb.com/history/wadlow/) comes to mind..

What a freak.

BCC
06-24-2004, 12:06 PM
The kid already has problems. Look at how his feet look. Hes not gonna look the way most of you think he will. He is definitely not the lucky bastard u are making him out to be. And I agree, he probably wont live very long.

That picture is from when he's 7 months old. According to that article it sounds like he's almost 5 now. A lot could have changed.

BCC
06-24-2004, 12:07 PM
Obviously this kid is going to have some health problems, but i don't think you can just assume that he won't live for "very long".


In the animals they've done this too, they did not live very long at all. So I think it's safe to assume he's going to run into many complications.

TBone4Eva
06-24-2004, 12:28 PM
In the animals they've done this too, they did not live very long at all. So I think it's safe to assume he's going to run into many complications.
Well, the question then is, how long did these animals live to be? Comparing their lifespans to that of the average lifespan of the control group may help us guessimate a potential age that the kid could reach.

Don't get me wrong, I once heard somewhere that a light bulb that burns twice as bright, also burns out in half the time. There are a bunch of factors to be considered though. How the mutation will affect his heart is probably the biggest issue. Nutrition will also play a role, as if I'm not mistaken his muscles will still need protein and sufficent calories in order to grow larger. Those muscles would also still need a stimulus to get freakishly huge.

The way I'm thinking about this is like if I were to take steroids, but didn't get enough proper nutritents or train correctly, then it wouldn't matter how much I injected myself, I wouldn't see a whole lot of gains.

Rock
06-24-2004, 12:49 PM
look at the heavy working type pit bulls, pulling small cars at the age of 15months, all muscle, genetically.

http://www.drawthelinekennels.com/males.htm

Narcissus
06-24-2004, 12:53 PM
all I can say is what are we doing to our world ?

how much do man-made chemicals (xenobiotics) play a role in this...

what precription filth did his mother take while she was pregnant ?

there were babies born in the 70's with flipper like arms because of a prescription drug that should have never been approved

we need to get control of big pharma and agri-business giants

may i suggest you purchase or check out from the library a book on genetics?

Growth
06-24-2004, 03:05 PM
http://rhodiolarosea.org/cystoseira-canariensis.pdf

The key finding in this study was that that serum myostatin possesses an
affinity to SPs isolated from a purified extract of the brown seaweed Cystoseira canariensis.

Collectively, these results indicate that SPs are physiologically active
compounds that participate in the regulation of various cellular processes,
including myostatin-binding properties that might open a new dimension in
muscle growth research.

Obviously you cant just expect to bottle some cystoseira canariensis, which is the active ingredient in myostatin blockers available at the moment, and say here, take this capsule of cysoseira and it will bind to myostatin proteins leaving you with limitless muscle growth. But its in the realm of possiblity that one day a product could be synthesized to do this.

Allenronm
06-24-2004, 03:48 PM
I guess he's lucky. Although I know in the mice they mutated, their life expectancy was cut in half. Well not exactly expectancy, they just died really soon.


Well, they said he may suffer from heart problems, wouldn't quite say he's lucky.

Slick 25
06-24-2004, 06:16 PM
What a freak.

LOL Hes a friggin' monster.

Holto
06-24-2004, 10:07 PM
may i suggest you purchase or check out from the library a book on genetics?

sure

if I find one with a chapter on mutant babies

I don't think you can rule out pharmaceuticals or xenobiotics

if you can I would love to hear it explained

BCC
06-24-2004, 11:39 PM
Well, the question then is, how long did these animals live to be? Comparing their lifespans to that of the average lifespan of the control group may help us guessimate a potential age that the kid could reach.

Don't get me wrong, I once heard somewhere that a light bulb that burns twice as bright, also burns out in half the time. There are a bunch of factors to be considered though. How the mutation will affect his heart is probably the biggest issue. Nutrition will also play a role, as if I'm not mistaken his muscles will still need protein and sufficent calories in order to grow larger. Those muscles would also still need a stimulus to get freakishly huge.

The way I'm thinking about this is like if I were to take steroids, but didn't get enough proper nutritents or train correctly, then it wouldn't matter how much I injected myself, I wouldn't see a whole lot of gains.

I believe the mice lived half as long as the control group. Also, I don't believe any stimulus is needed for the muscles to grow freaskishly large. There are cattle (I don't remember the name of them) which lack the gene, they eat and grow freakishly large and remain very lean.

TBone4Eva
06-25-2004, 05:22 AM
I believe the mice lived half as long as the control group. Also, I don't believe any stimulus is needed for the muscles to grow freaskishly large. There are cattle (I don't remember the name of them) which lack the gene, they eat and grow freakishly large and remain very lean.
Hmmm, well it could be possible that he may live to be in his mid 30's to early 40's. That's not bad. More than enough time to have kids who will share his genetics!

I wonder though, if you kept him on a strict low calorie diet he may not grow too large. He would still be strong as an Ox though. I'd love to see him on an episode of Cops! :p

Allyrulez
06-25-2004, 05:25 AM
KFC and other fast food companys pump chickens full of crap so they grow full size in like 1/8th of the time as a normal chicken... They cant walk or do anything, some cant even hold up their own heads.. But they are buff!!! So who cares

TBone4Eva
06-25-2004, 05:34 AM
KFC and other fast food companys pump chickens full of crap so they grow full size in like 1/8th of the time as a normal chicken... They cant walk or do anything, some cant even hold up their own heads.. But they are buff!!! So who cares
I'm assuming you mean that this kid might suffer the same complications.

What you said is very true, but don't forget that a chicken is a bird and thus they have hollow bones to begin with. As long as his muscles don't outgrow his body's ability to strengthen his tendons and bones he should be ok in that respect.

rapidshoter
06-25-2004, 06:24 AM
If he does win Mr olmpyia, he don't get my respect .......... people work years to get bigger and he's legs are already big! His ass is as big as mine.

Not fair at all ........ takes the hard work out of training.

NateDogg
06-25-2004, 07:06 AM
Don't mess with this crap. Read the full advertisement ad (http://www.bulknutrition.com/?products_id=118) and you will see that they make absolutely no claims that their product works or that it is safe. They constantly cite one study done on mice. One study on mice and no offer no proof that their product works at all. In fact they are asking people to enroll to be guinea pigs. Don't be a fool. Stay away until a little more empirical research has been conducted.

melt

Did I infer somewhere that I was even mildly considering using this junk?? :confused:

meltedtime
06-25-2004, 08:24 AM
Did I infer somewhere that I was even mildly considering using this junk??

No.


Actually, the article stated outright that products like that are useless and could be dangerous.


Did I offend you in some way? I elaborated on your statement and commented on the advertisement not the original article. Sorry for stepping on your toes or confusing you or whatever it is I've done dude. Don't want people thinking you're a myostatin blocking junkie.

melt

Narcissus
06-25-2004, 08:37 AM
sure

if I find one with a chapter on mutant babies



i doubt that there is any genetics book in publication that does not have several chapters that deal with mutants - what do you think sickle-cell, huntington's, multiple sclerosis, and a plethora of neoplasias are resultant from?




I don't think you can rule out pharmaceuticals or xenobiotics



actually - you can. he is homozygous recessive for the allele.




if you can I would love to hear it explained

too humdrum for me to explain. if you choose to take my advice on picking up a book, check the glossary for the following terms and take notes:

genotype
phenotype
allele
wildtype
mutant
single nucleotide polymorphism
heterozygous
homozygous
mendelian crosses

Beast
06-25-2004, 09:15 AM
I read about myostatin in my old cell bio book. It had this pic of a cow where you could see ALL of its muscles popping out... Cattle breeders pay big bucks for these bad boys.
I am willing to bet that this super baby will probably die an early death... there is a reason that myostatin exists.

dxiw
06-25-2004, 10:42 AM
This is definitely not a blessing but a curse. He will surely die early and suffer from an enlarged heart. When cardiac muscle hypertrophies with time it leads to death. Also, he is way out of balance and muscles that big with that much tension on the bones at his age will screw up his bone development. Just watch - this kid is in for some trouble.

Gyno Rhino
06-25-2004, 10:47 AM
As others have hinted at, there is SOME evidence that myostatin inhibition will not only affect skeletal muscle, but also cardiac muscle. I don't think, though, that there has been any definitive concensus on exactly what will happen - we'll have to wait and see.

But I'll side with the camp who believe it more of a curse than a blessing - he'll likely die early.

VasDeferens
06-25-2004, 11:13 AM
This is definitely not a blessing but a curse. He will surely die early and suffer from an enlarged heart. When cardiac muscle hypertrophies with time it leads to death. Also, he is way out of balance and muscles that big with that much tension on the bones at his age will screw up his bone development. Just watch - this kid is in for some trouble.

you are just jealous :D

Holto
06-25-2004, 11:13 AM
actually - you can. he is homozygous recessive for the allele

can you tell me what factors caused the expression of this phenotype ?

all you are telling me is that it's a random thing...I don't buy it

can you point to a study with conceiving parents/pregnant women and synthetic drugs that shows genetic mutation is NOT possible ?

can you point to a study with conceiving parents/pregnant women and the 3000 agrichemicals people consume regularly that shows genetic mutation is NOT possible ?

I'm going to find an article that talked about HUNDREDS of babies born in the 70's with flipper like arms because of a dangerous pharmaceutical

I'm assuming that something must occur on the genetic level for this to occur

correct me if I'm wrong because I am only here to learn

TBone4Eva
06-25-2004, 12:35 PM
You know something, the article said that this kid has two mutated copies of the gene. One each from mom and dad. There is no information about the dad for whatever reason. The thing is, they said it is extremely rare to have this mutated gene in the first place. So, either the mother got extremely lucky meeting up with another guy with the mutation or.........(Remember her brothers also carry the mutation) :angel:

Holto
06-25-2004, 12:41 PM
or both mom and dad's parents drank from the same polluted water supply while living in the same municipality

JeffWillConquer
06-25-2004, 12:43 PM
lol Tbone. What goes on in that head of yours?

Podium Kreatin
06-25-2004, 01:33 PM
check this out: a baby in germany has two mutated myostatin alleles from each parent, and at 4 years old, he's stronger than some adults! they said this could lead to myostatin research, esp for ppl w/ muscular dystrophy diseases. for those who don't know, myostatin is the gene that limits muscle growth in humans. currently, scientists mutated teh gene in certain commercial animals, such as in cows for more muscular beef. so far, scientists consider myostatin inhibitor supps and drugs for the use of bodybuilding dangerous

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/5278028/?GT1=3584

Shao-LiN
06-25-2004, 01:36 PM
Homozygous recessive allelic expression is a bit too simplistic to explain why this happened, IMO. You're banking that 99% of people are homozygous dominant for the allele. If even 50% of the population is heterozygous, you'd see way more occurrences as, if you apply simple Mendelian logic, 25% of the population would express a homozygous recessive trait.

Saint Patrick
06-25-2004, 01:47 PM
Congratulations on being the 3rd person to post the same thing :)

TBone4Eva
06-25-2004, 02:46 PM
Homozygous recessive allelic expression is a bit too simplistic to explain why this happened, IMO. You're banking that 99% of people are homozygous dominant for the allele. If even 50% of the population is heterozygous, you'd see way more occurrences as, if you apply simple Mendelian logic, 25% of the population would express a homozygous recessive trait.
Huh??? :scratch: Me no speaka that kindna english :p

T_Chapman
06-25-2004, 03:36 PM
lol two other messageboards i go to has been posting several threads on this. one forum had like four people post this a day after the first guy did lol. its been two days and people are still just finding this out.

voodazz
06-25-2004, 03:39 PM
Poor little kid. He's in for a lifetime of pain. These scientists sound like they can't wait to cut him up for research.

Also, this explains why my post about this was swiftly deleted. :p

Allie
06-25-2004, 03:53 PM
Calypege sheep came to mind when I saw this on the news. As stated before the life expectancy is shorter in both calypege sheep and "Mighty Mice". This mutation is genetically linked, and hasn't really been studied in people, mostly mice and then sheep, a little research and breeding projects have been done in beef cattle as well.

I'm sure this poor kid will be a scientists dream come true and will shed a little light on the subject. As I recall from genetics class, and anat and phys (both of which I passed on my notes to a friend) In mice they have been able to successfully manipulate the genes to produce the double muscling, mostly because mice make nice lab animals, whereas calltle and sheep are larger and have a longer gestation periods which make them less desirable for lab testing.

I'm sure if you are real egaer to do some reading you can find some good info in the journal of animal science, I'm not sure what you would find if you searched medical journals.

ItalianGalleon
06-25-2004, 04:21 PM
I was about to post this, too. Except my thread would have been much cooler and more informative.

Alex.V
06-25-2004, 05:12 PM
Homozygous recessive allelic expression is a bit too simplistic to explain why this happened, IMO. You're banking that 99% of people are homozygous dominant for the allele. If even 50% of the population is heterozygous, you'd see way more occurrences as, if you apply simple Mendelian logic, 25% of the population would express a homozygous recessive trait.

Um, no. 99.9999% of the population can INDEED been homozygous dominant for the allele. That has nothing to do with "mendelian logic", that's simply mutation frequency.

Holto, what deep pocket of your ass are you pulling this stuff out of? Genetic mutations are as old as life itself, and you're claiming it's polluted water? Nobody is saying that humans aren't creating various mutagens, but there are still a huge amount of spontaneous mutations, not to mention naturally occuring mutagens.. enough that it's absolutely absurd to speculate as to the specific cause, unless you have proof. The mother was heterozygous, the father was likely the same, therefore this result was extremely rare, and pretty much a fluke. And before you say "Oh, what are the odds", remember that, out of the 5+ billion people in the world, this is the one kid in the news for this condition. Not saying he's the only one, but he's quite possibly the only one people in the western world have heard about.. and again, this could simply be because this phenotype is not only exceedingly rare, but also extremely dramatic in is exhibition.

Yes, there was a drug that caused birth defects. It was a mutagen. I'm still trying to figure out what the hell that has to do with this case. You're saying because certain man made compounds are ALSO mutagens (besides the literally millions of mutagens that occur in nature), that this child was DEFINITELY the result of those damn pharmaceutical companies?

Where's my damn tin foil hat.

Songsangnim
06-25-2004, 07:24 PM
check this out: a baby in germany has two mutated myostatin alleles from each parent, and at 4 years old, he's stronger than some adults! they said this could lead to myostatin research, esp for ppl w/ muscular dystrophy diseases. for those who don't know, myostatin is the gene that limits muscle growth in humans. currently, scientists mutated teh gene in certain commercial animals, such as in cows for more muscular beef. so far, scientists consider myostatin inhibitor supps and drugs for the use of bodybuilding dangerous

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/5278028/?GT1=3584


Let's not get carried away here people. The kid can hold seven pound weights with arms extended. Big deal. So can my 5 year old nephew and he doesn't have these mutated mysostatin allelies as far as I know.

JTyrell710
06-25-2004, 07:36 PM
yea what was up with that seven pound weight thing- thats easy

Podium Kreatin
06-25-2004, 08:44 PM
Let's not get carried away here people. The kid can hold seven pound weights with arms extended. Big deal. So can my 5 year old nephew and he doesn't have these mutated mysostatin allelies as far as I know.

about teh 7 lbs thing; i dunno what they mean by arms extended, but the article says it was more than soem adults (maybe they mean holding 7lbs w/ arm extended for along period of time, not lat raise motion)

Sug
06-26-2004, 01:17 AM
Maybe 7lbs compared to how much the child weighs, thats maybe 20% of his weight, so like an average guy 150lbs holding 30lbs. ( if he doesnt workout then that should be difficult.)

-sin-
06-26-2004, 04:59 AM
Let's not get carried away here people. The kid can hold seven pound weights with arms extended. Big deal. So can my 5 year old nephew and he doesn't have these mutated mysostatin allelies as far as I know.

Its like taking 2 1-gallon jugs and doing a lateral raise. That is phenominal strength for a 4 year old and I highly doubt your nephew could do it.

Gyno Rhino
06-26-2004, 08:26 AM
Nobody is saying that humans aren't creating various mutagens, but there are still a huge amount of spontaneous mutations, not to mention naturally occuring mutagens.. enough that it's absolutely absurd to speculate as to the specific cause, unless you have proof.

Al is right.

And I think this above part of his post is the part that we should focus on. Unless we have some kind of proof as to exactly what happened and why, everything is speculation.

Songsangnim
06-26-2004, 09:56 AM
Since you have never seen my nephew, you obviously have no clue what you are talking about. Do you come on this board often to contribute anything of value, or just to tell members that they are lying? Next time engage brain before fingers.

JTyrell710
06-26-2004, 10:10 AM
EA- he just doubted your nephew could do it, he didnt say for sure that he couldnt- there's no need for that

bullethead
06-26-2004, 10:15 AM
your nephew is a freak

chris mason
06-26-2004, 12:08 PM
Try holding a 7lb dumbbell with straight elbows and your arms in the top position of the front raise (arm parallel to the floor). It is not so easy as you may think.

Chomsky
06-26-2004, 12:38 PM
I believe the myostatin blocking gene is heterozygous dominant in one out of every hundred thousand people... so the two parents would have to be both heterozygous dominant to even have a 25% chance of blocking the myostatin.
I think the Punnett square looks something like this: (assume A is myostatin blocking gene and a is the recessive trait)
A a
A AA Aa

a Aa aa
Therefore, these two parents have a 25% chance of having a homozygous dominant child, 50% of a heterozygous dominant child, and 25% homozygous recessive (the super baby in this case.) Odds are pretty mindboggling.
There also could be something such as incomplete dominance of traits or another mendelian factor that comes into this equation.
Hope that explains it.

Holto
06-26-2004, 01:03 PM
out of the 5+ billion people in the world, this is the one kid in the news for this condition

you indicated many mutations date back prior to the invention of any xenobiotics

does this specific type of mutation also date back to this time or is it the result of xenobiotics ?

ItalianGalleon
06-26-2004, 02:57 PM
I first saw the story on a german website, which contained an interesting typo. They claimed that the boy could hold out 70 lbs. 7 is way less interesting than that, but much more believable.

Bruise Brubaker
06-26-2004, 04:25 PM
I read it today in the newspaper and they were saying 10 pounds... maybe they were lying.

KeMiKaL
06-26-2004, 04:30 PM
I wonder if this kid would be allowed to compete in a powerlifting comp when they know he's a "mutant" ;)

Also I tried holding a 10-lb dumbell out. Amazing how a 5 year old could hold a 7.

Chomsky
06-26-2004, 05:30 PM
Holto- it is impossible to say whether xenobiotics caused the mutation to happen. It is also impossible to know whether this same mutation dates back throughout time because the Human Genome Project was completed around the year 2000. In 1930, for example, humanity lacked the knowledge to ascertain the possibility of a genetic defect/mutation.

Songsangnim
06-26-2004, 10:18 PM
It all depends on how it was done. Did this kid raise the weight from a dead stop at his side, or did he do it hercules hold style (where the weight is handed to him) and the arms are already straight out? Also how long did he hold it? Was there a slight bend in the elbows?


As regards my nephew, he was able to hold a 7 lb DB for approximately 2 sec in the hercules style. Not very long, but he could do it. As for being a freak, well my brother (his father) is the same size as me and does not lift weights. Yet he can hold and carry one end of a piano or freezer by himself while two guys are struggling to carry the other end. My nephew seems to have gotten a healthy share of his genes. He is five years old but looks seven. A big husky kid.

I don't know about it being easy but I was able to hold a seven lb DB between finger and thumb, with the shoulder level with the rest of the arm for nearly 20 seconds.
Now if the kid could hold the weight (in whatever fashion) with arms extended for that long, yes that is astounding. But if it were just for a second or two, still remarkable but not (I should think) newsworthy.

TiGeR AK
06-26-2004, 11:56 PM
quit hating on the kid.

an average 4 year old weighs 35-40 lbs

so 7 lbs is about 18-20% of his bodyweight.

and remember, he hasn't been lifting weights or anything like that.

So imagine yourself, before you started working out. a 180lb dude holding a 36lb weight out with a straight arm.. that's pretty damn hard.

and also keep in mind that when you go through puberty, you gain a lot of muscle mass that you didn't have when you were a child.

so if the kid can do that without having lifted weights or gone through puberty.. imagine when age 15 starts rolling around. he'll be lifting crazy weights.

KrAzY
06-27-2004, 03:42 AM
quit hating on the kid.

an average 4 year old weighs 35-40 lbs

so 7 lbs is about 18-20% of his bodyweight.

and remember, he hasn't been lifting weights or anything like that.

So imagine yourself, before you started working out. a 180lb dude holding a 36lb weight out with a straight arm.. that's pretty damn hard.

That doesnt seem very impressive.. its like some kid thats 200 pounds vs some kid thats 100 pounds doing pushups and neither of them have worked out before. Even if they were pushing the same percent of their bodyweight it would be way easier with the lighter body. Any thoughts? :scratch:

IdaMAN
06-27-2004, 04:22 AM
Ya, the freakin kid is 4 years old. Only thing he used his muscles for are throwing things at the house pet or picking his nose.

KrAzY
06-27-2004, 03:40 PM
Thats not very helpful info.. :( What do ya think about my comparison.. common help me out here :P

Sug
06-27-2004, 06:59 PM
It might be easier for the 100lb kid b/c the 200lb kid probably has 40% body fat and the 100lb kid probably is way leaner. Thats probably the only reason why. TigerAk I posted the same thing.

Budiak
06-29-2004, 01:27 AM
Many scientists believe the find could eventually lead to drugs for treating people with muscular dystrophy and other muscle-destroying conditions. And athletes would almost surely want to get their hands on such a drug and use it like steroids to bulk up.

Now that just pisses me off.

You can't start a sentence with a conjunction!

RG570
06-29-2004, 01:50 AM
Now that just pisses me off.

You can't start a sentence with a conjunction!
Yeah, wtf?

phreak
06-29-2004, 03:42 AM
Now that just pisses me off.

You can't start a sentence with a conjunction!
And what are you gonna do about it???



:D

MrWebb78
06-29-2004, 05:05 AM
whats the big deal, i lift a total of 14 lbs with both hands everytime i take a piss

Tallwithbrneyez
06-29-2004, 06:13 AM
As regards my nephew, he was able to hold a 7 lb DB for approximately 2 sec in the hercules style. Not very long, but he could do it. As for being a freak, well my brother (his father) is the same size as me and does not lift weights. Yet he can hold and carry one end of a piano or freezer by himself while two guys are struggling to carry the other end. My nephew seems to have gotten a healthy share of his genes. He is five years old but looks seven. A big husky kid.


http://i.myspace.com/76/57/977567/6373743_m.jpg

Songsangnim
06-29-2004, 08:18 AM
EA- he just doubted your nephew could do it, he didnt say for sure that he couldnt- there's no need for that

Yes, but I said that he could. He said 'well I doubt that" or words to that effect. So if you tell me that you can bench 200 pounds and I say "well I don't think you can" without ever seeing you or knowing anything about you, that's pretty foolish. Also basically it's accusing you (indirectly) of lying. If I had said " I think my nephew could do that.." then maybe he or you would have a case.

galileo
06-29-2004, 08:47 AM
Now that just pisses me off.

You can't start a sentence with a conjunction!

That's what I was taught in highschool, but in college it was stated in my honors class that the rule was made obsolete. But what do I know?

MrWebb78
06-29-2004, 09:41 AM
what a subtle way to mention you were in an HONORS class.

galileo
06-29-2004, 10:23 AM
what a subtle way to mention you were in an HONORS class.

It was validation of the source. Now, what would be a subtle way to tell you to go **** yourself? ;)

Holto
06-29-2004, 11:52 AM
LOL

yeah if you had just said college we would have needed more validation

galileo
06-29-2004, 12:14 PM
LOL

yeah if you had just said college we would have needed more validation

If that was sarcasm, then I assume you've not met the average undergrad English professor at a state school. :p

ElPietro
06-29-2004, 12:19 PM
Ok, I merged the two threads, since they were both pretty big, I guess the newer one slipped by, as there are already 2 or 3 duplicates in purgatory.

So if you see some new posts before some that you have made that is why. It's all added chronologically. For you meatheads that means in the order of time it was posted. :)