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View Full Version : If cutting is a caloric deficit...



DokterVet
07-07-2004, 03:25 PM
All those people in the gym that work out year after year and never show any signs of improvement in any way, because, according to many, they aren't eating enough to get bigger.... how come they aren't all ripped? It seems like a lot of people don't eat enough and should be ripped but they aren't.

Is reducing calories alone really enough to cut? Have any of you had success in this way?

Shao-LiN
07-07-2004, 04:03 PM
Maintenance caloric requirements adjust to your lifestyle. So, if you aren't eating enough for a long time (say you weight 170 and you only eat 2000 calories a day) then your body will adjust to your level of eating. It isn't as cut and dry as a mathematical equation.

Growth
07-07-2004, 04:47 PM
Hmmm, perhaps its like this. They are eating basically the same amount of calories per week, same excersises per week, so if theyre bodies are in a state of equilibrium. The body has adapted to that level of calories, and now is stagnant until further calorie change is enforced. If you want to upset the balance and put on weight, eat alot more food, increase the calories in vs. calories out, and again the body will adapt to that level of calorie intake and remain at that level until another change occurs.

I think the reason these people dont eat enough to gain, and dont eat enough to get ripped is due to this equilibrium effect. They simply arent eating enough above maintainance to gain, and not significantly below to cut.

Its like shao said you cant expect a 240 pound guy to eat 2000 cals and not lose weight. To sustain the level hes achived he needs to have more calories, yet for a person who weighs 170 pounds 2000 cals may be enough to leave them in a stagnant position

TBone4Eva
07-07-2004, 06:26 PM
Maintenance caloric requirements adjust to your lifestyle. So, if you aren't eating enough for a long time (say you weight 170 and you only eat 2000 calories a day) then your body will adjust to your level of eating. It isn't as cut and dry as a mathematical equation.
I agree. Your body will not just adjust to your level of eating, but it will also try to make you adjust as well. Your body wants to maintain a balance, cals in vs. cals out. The easiest way to do this is to simply increase your sense of hunger in an effort to get you to eat more. I've noticed the more I exercise the hungrier I become as well. So, it's possible that while they are exercising more, they are also eating more thus balancing it out. That's why it's important to pay attention to what you are eating.

Holto
07-07-2004, 08:04 PM
Is reducing calories alone really enough to cut? Have any of you had success in this way?

I've lost a ton of weight in the last 13 months

the first half my diet was garbage and all I did was really count cals

now I eat really clean and dont count anything

_8_Ball
07-08-2004, 11:27 AM
I've lost a ton of weight in the last 13 months

the first half my diet was garbage and all I did was really count cals

now I eat really clean and dont count anything


How much have you lost?

_8_

Holto
07-08-2004, 11:32 AM
<---------- 68

_8_Ball
07-08-2004, 12:21 PM
Wow... what sort of tweeks have you needed to make once you were past the 50lbs mark?

_8_