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View Full Version : My first homemade sushi/sashimi dinner pic.



manowar669
07-19-2004, 04:50 PM
Someone else did this before, and posted their pics here, so I can't claim credit for the idea. I went to work today, found out they had enough people, so I took the night off. Went to the grocery store, and well........
http://www.hunt101.com/img/204559.JPG

You'll notice the tub of vanilla whey in the background, as well as the bag of splenda. :help:

dissipate
07-20-2004, 06:35 AM
looks good. you wrapped it nicely :) now i feel hungry... :drooling:

geoffgarcia
07-20-2004, 09:06 AM
you can get sushi grade fish at your local grocery store? wow!
where I live you have to go to a special fish market to get that grade of fish.

ryuage
07-20-2004, 09:41 AM
looks good, id eat it :)

manowar669
07-20-2004, 09:55 AM
you can get sushi grade fish at your local grocery store? wow!

Actually, I just bought a never-frozen salmon filet, and cut away any exposed surfaces. It was quite fresh-tasting (compared to sushi bars, etc). "Sushi grade", for the most part, is something that they stick on some grades of seafood so they can charge twice as much.
I was deep-sea fishing with friends once, and we landed a nice yellowtail tuna. The fish was still moving on the deck when I pulled out my pocket knife and sliced off a hunk of the filet and ate it right there. Now THAT's sushi grade!

geoffgarcia
07-20-2004, 10:01 AM
I was deep-sea fishing with friends once, and we landed a nice yellowtail tuna. The fish was still moving on the deck when I pulled out my pocket knife and sliced off a hunk of the filet and ate it right there. Now THAT's sushi grade!
i've done the same, but you'll never catch me going to a supermarket and just cutting off exposed areas from 3 day old salmon and eating it raw...at least not if I'm sober :alcoholic
There is a reason they put those little sticks in the fish and call it sushi grade...

also, its the freezing process that kills a lot of fish parasites...there are requirements for sushi grade seafood to be frozen at certain temperatures depending on how long they've been out of the water and what type of fish it is according to HACCP

manowar669
07-20-2004, 11:57 AM
That's interesting. I wasn't aware that sushi-grade fish was actually frozen. I thought to keep the texture, it couldn't be frozen. I did know that certain parts of certain filets are prized for their texture, and fat content (i.e. near the head is better, and belly portions of the filet, etc).

geoffgarcia
07-20-2004, 12:14 PM
fish that is suitable for eating raw must be frozen for seven days at negative 4 degrees Fahrenheit, or flash frozen for 15 hours at negative 31 degrees. Contrary to popular belief, fish that's "fresh out of the ocean" is often dangerous to eat.
The Food and Drug Administration stipulates that all fish to be eaten raw (with the exception of tuna) must be frozen first, in order to kill parasites.
The FDA leaves enforcement of the frozen-fish rule to local health officials.
http://ask.yahoo.com/ask/20040513.html


Most diners would be even more surprised to learn that if the fish has not been frozen, it is illegal to serve it raw in the United States.

Food and Drug Administration regulations stipulate that all fish to be eaten raw -- whether as sushi, sashimi, ceviche or tartare -- must be frozen first, to kill parasites.
Rudie says that worldwide, some sushi and sashimi products are virtually always frozen. "Ninety percent of shrimp, of course," he said, The salmon roe "and octopus, 99 percent. And you definitely want all your salmon frozen, because of parasites."
http://www.indystar.com/articles/3/157000-5333-067.html

landlord
07-20-2004, 01:43 PM
and then if you get parasites, go to www.curezone.com

getting rid of them is a long and ugly process... not worth it IMO.