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Vido
07-25-2004, 01:34 AM
Let's take walking on a treadmill for example. Say you walk at 3.5mph for 20 minutes and burn 200 calories. Now, let's say you keep doing this same routine 3x/week for quite some time. Chances are the cardio becomes easier for you, whether from an actual cardiovascular improvement or just from repetition. My question is this: The cardio FEELS easier, but is it actually easier for your body? Once this adjustment occurs, do you burn less calories in the 20 minute session because you're not working as hard, or is it just that you feel you're not working as hard so the calories burned would remain a constant? (Assume bodyweight stays constant throughout.)

ryuage
07-25-2004, 06:12 AM
I doubt you would receive any cardiovascular imrpovement from such low intensity, unless you are severely untrained and severely obese and 3.5 mph is quite a challenge for you haha, hopefully that is an example because 200 calories from 20 minutes at 3.5 mph doesnt seem likely, but I'm sure aka will come here and elaborate a little more as I don't know myself, I'm pretty sure it does somehow effect it in some way... you could alwayas post in his journal and he might respond a little faster.

gopher
07-25-2004, 06:37 AM
As your body becomes more efficient at a task (walking on a treadmill or whatever) through repetition you will burn fewer calories completing the same task. Cardio, just like weight lifting, requires progression to produce continued results IMHO. Using your treadmill example I would suggest that you gradually increase your pace as walking becomes easier.

Manveet
07-25-2004, 10:07 AM
Let's take walking on a treadmill for example. Say you walk at 3.5mph for 20 minutes and burn 200 calories. Now, let's say you keep doing this same routine 3x/week for quite some time. Chances are the cardio becomes easier for you, whether from an actual cardiovascular improvement or just from repetition. My question is this: The cardio FEELS easier, but is it actually easier for your body? Once this adjustment occurs, do you burn less calories in the 20 minute session because you're not working as hard, or is it just that you feel you're not working as hard so the calories burned would remain a constant? (Assume bodyweight stays constant throughout.)


Assuming you would get a training affect from such a low intensity, you would notice some improvements. Namely your heart rate would be lower while performing the submaximal cardio. Increase in stroke volume (amount of blood pumped by the left or right ventricle in one beat) You would also notice a slight decrease in your cardiac output as well (amount of blood pumped throughout the body in one minute). I'm not sure about the calories though, I could only generalize that you would eventually burn less calories, given the above changes. But I could be wrong.