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attica
08-11-2004, 08:18 AM
Is there a fat breakdown discussion somewhere in the archives that I can't seem to find? I'm sure it's been discussed before, but I'm not finding it in the searching I'm doing.

Basically, I know that for 2000 cal per day intake, I need to consume 66.67g of fat for a 30% composition. I'm comfortable with the 30% of total calories (for now, anyway). I know some people prefer more, others less, but that's not really the point of my question. What I'd like to know is the target amounts of saturated, mono-, and polyunsaturated which comprise the 66.67 total.

The general rule is to minimize saturated, avoid trans, focus on monos and polys, but is there a guideline somwhere that says something like:

10% saturated
50% polys
40% monos

???

TIA.

TheGimp
08-11-2004, 08:41 AM
I'm sure geoff can provide some hard numbers but I believe some guidlines are:

No more than 20g of saturated fat a day although it is not the devil people make it out to be. A certain amount is good for testosterone production.

Adequate EFAs. Two tablespoons of fish oil (30g) ? These are poly fats.

The rest neutral monounsaturated fat. Good sources are olive oil, avocados and nuts.

Avoid trans fats like the plague.

attica
08-11-2004, 08:45 AM
I'm sure geoff can provide some hard numbers but I believe some guidlines are:

No more than 20g of saturated fat a day although it is not the devil people make it out to be. A certain amount is good for testosterone production.

I agree.



Adequate EFAs. Two tablespoons of fish oil (30g) ? These are poly fats.

The rest neutral monounsaturated fat. Good sources are olive oil, avocados and nuts.

Cool. This is a great place to start. My math shows then, that of the 66.67g per day, the breakdown should be something like this:

Sat: <20g
Poly: ~20g
Mono: ~26g


Avoid trans fats like the plague.

Heh, yeah. Did some research into that once:

http://www.wannabebigforums.com/showpost.php?p=813847&postcount=56

Thanks for the quick and informative reply. Now I can start to construct that part of my diet plan...

geoffgarcia
08-11-2004, 09:20 AM
This is all I found

Saturated Fats
Most scientists state that this fat is not essential because we can make it from other fats. That may be correct up to a point. The human body does need saturated fats because they protect your organs and joints, while serving as an energy source.

The "establishment" does not recommend the intake of saturated fats because they supposedly have a negative affect on your heart function and cholesterol levels. Examples of food containing saturated fats are egg yolks, red meat, butter, sour cream, pork, cream cheese, and oils including olive oil (14%).

Polyunsaturated Fats
They serve as messengers and play an important role in muscle building. One omega 3 polyunsaturated fat is alpha-linolenic acid and it is an essential fatty acid.

One omega 6 polyunsaturated fat is another essential fatty acid (alpha linoleic acid). The essential fatty acid substructures that sound like measures of gas mileage called EPA and DHA are called marine oils and stand for eicosapapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid. Examples of polyunsaturated fats include corn oil, canola oil, flaxseed oil, cod liver oil and salmon.

Don't use oils high in polyunsaturated fats to cook because they will become hydrogenated and unstable when heated, i.e. safflower, canola, flax or corn.

Monounsaturated Fats
These fats are important in building muscle and losing fat. The most important source in this group is olive oil and extra virgin oil (canned extra virgin oil from Spain or Italy is the best source). Nuts like cashews/macadamia also are in this category.

Hydrogenated Fats
You should not consume these fats, period.
Examples include almost all commercial crackers, cookies and cakes, margarine, Crisco shortening and things like "innocent" artificial coffee creamers.

What is the optimal ratio of varying fats for health? My research is not finished so I am not sure yet, but if I had to play Jimmy the Greek, I would say 2:3:1 of polyunsaturated to monounsaturated to saturated fats.

Studies done with rats show that a high consumption of polyunsaturated fats will increase the size of the fat cells. Corn oil, specifically, and oils high in Omega 6 or other polyunsaturated oils can also increase fat size. Saturated fats increase the size and the volume or number of the fat cells, while monounsaturated don't do anything to the size of the fat cells.

http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/planet3.htm



good health a diet that contains less than 30% of the fat coming from saturates (less than 30g of saturates per 100g fat) and 70% coming from polyunsaturates. Some of my colleagues even suggest that 10% of the fat coming from saturates (10g of saturates per 100g of fat) and 90% of the fat coming from polyunsaturates may be even better for optimal health.
http://www.johnberardi.com/articles/qa/afc/afc_jan032003.htm

attica
08-11-2004, 09:23 AM
awesome stuff - thanks guys.