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Homz
08-17-2004, 02:20 PM
At the risk of coming off as the stupid newbie, I confess my ignorance of powerlifting entirely. I'm kinda confused on the difference between PLing and BBing. I know that powerlifting is more for strength, and there's no cutting, but aside from that, I'm lost. Do you gain faster with PLing? If so, why?

Paul Stagg
08-17-2004, 02:23 PM
Powerlifting is an athletic competition where the individual performs a squat, bench press, and deadlift under controlled conditions and rules.

sometimes, Plers have to 'cut' to make weight for a competition. Most smaller PLers are quite lean.

Ja113
08-17-2004, 07:57 PM
To add to what Paul said....training methods are different between the two.

In bodybuilding, you're trying to stimulate your muscle tissues to stimulate growth. You'll get strong too but it's not the primary goal.

In powerlifting, you're training mainly for strength in the three lifts. You'll gain size however, it's more an after thought.

Max-Mex
08-17-2004, 08:09 PM
Pl'ers also use all sorts of equipment when lifting. BB'ers usually just use gloves, straps and belts. PL'ers use bench shirts, belts, wrist wraps, knee wraps, DL/Squat suits, etc, etc. Most of the equipment used by Pl'ers is for safety but it does help with the lift.

Homz
08-18-2004, 01:01 AM
That was something else I noticed, squats for PLers sit lower on the neck/shoulders then BB. Any reason for that?

Anthony
08-18-2004, 04:11 AM
Better leverage.

Saturday Fever
08-18-2004, 03:43 PM
Shorter bar path.

Feminator
08-23-2004, 06:33 AM
Bodybuilding = muscles as big as possible, bodyfat as low as possible, i.e. pure aesthetics, they could be weak as a girl as long as they look pretty.

Powerlifting = Lifting as much as possible in the bench press, squat and deadlift, i.e. pure strength, they need to be strong.

Put simply, bodybuilders talk the talk, powerlifters walk the walk.

johnnytang24
08-23-2004, 10:44 AM
Shorter bar path.

Same bar path. It starts lower, but goes lower.

Saturday Fever
08-23-2004, 12:33 PM
Goes lower according to whom? Guys who put the bar high squat to the floor. Guys who squat like PL'ers go to parallel. Unless I'm misunderstanding you.

Saturday Fever
08-23-2004, 12:33 PM
And there's the whole straight line being the shortest path between two points.

EviscerationX
08-23-2004, 03:52 PM
Bodybuilding = muscles as big as possible


they could be weak as a girl as long as they look pretty.

Those don't go together...by the way...

mercury
08-23-2004, 06:10 PM
I look at it this way: Bodybuilders look stong; Powerlifters are strong. Of course there are always exceptions.

chris mason
08-24-2004, 04:48 PM
I think that is a bit too general. Many bodybuilders are very strong and if they used the same supportive gear as powerlifters they would be very close in strength.

Powerlifters train with progressive resistance to be strong in the 3 specific lifts they must perform in competition.

Bodybuilders train with progressive resistance in order to increase the size of their muscles.

Both train progressively, but the bodybuilder will include a wider variation of exercises (usually) with the idea of obtaining full development of the body.

Ebu
09-15-2004, 11:34 PM
Bodybuilding is for girly men...

Dirty Sanchez
09-16-2004, 07:41 PM
To debate is a dead end street. There are so many variables- to compare- is a waste of time.We are all Brothers in iron.

Big J
09-18-2004, 10:59 PM
Shorter bar path.

It's definately not for shorter bar path. No matter where you put it on your back you have to squat below parallel in powerlifting. If the bar is on top of your shoulder or low on your traps is still going to travel the same distance. The reason powerlifters generally keep the bar low on their back is because it helps them keep their back straight while going extremely deep. Plus the lower the bar sits the straighter you can keep your forearms under the bar.

The main difference in bodybuilding and powerlifting is that powerlifter train for strength & bodybuilders train for size. It's not uncommon to see a 200 pound powerlifter outlift a 240 pound bodybuilder. However, you talk to some of the great bodybuilders & they'll tell you that powerlifting before bodybuilding helps give you an excellant base to start building on. Franco Columbo comes to mind.

Back to the main question. You gain strength faster with powerlifting becuase thats how they train. You'll get stronger bodybuilding, but powerlifting definately is more suited for stregth. If you're looking to grow faster then bodybuilding would be the route to go.

Saturday Fever
09-19-2004, 12:44 AM
It definitely IS shorter bar path, but thanks for trying to chime in. Powelifters set the bar lower because they squat back. This gives the bar a straight line up and down. And as we all know the shortest distance between two points is a straight line. Thanks though.

Maki Riddington
09-19-2004, 12:55 AM
No need to be a smart ass about it SF.

Big J
09-19-2004, 02:59 PM
Again I'm going to have to argue with you. I keep my back at a certain point the entire way down. So in a perfect lift, my back never moves. So regardless if I have it on my back or lower on my traps the bar is going to travel the same distance. Take for example a 6'0" lifter squats down to 2'0" & then back up (JUST AN EXAMPLE not proper numbers). If the bar is high on the lifter at 5'10" & he squats, then the bar is going to go down to four feet. Same as if he has it low say 5'8" on his shoulder. No matter how high or low it is it's going to travel the same distance. If he puts it higher then the bar is going to stop higher. If he puts it lower, it's going to drop lower.

I powerlifted for 2 years on a collegaite level & have never had anyone tell me to put the bar low on your back because "the distance it traveled will be shorter". To me it just dont make any sense. I already posted why we do it. SO if I am wrong please show me a link or reference or something that explain this to me. I just dont see where you're comin from.

No worries Maki, I'm used to smartasses.

Saturday Fever
09-19-2004, 03:56 PM
Amazing, then, that the world's biggest squatters don't follow your line of thought. They could be wrong though, I guess.

johnnytang24
09-21-2004, 06:30 PM
The bar is lower for better leverage. but the bar still has to move just as far as long as the back does not bend.

biggimp
09-21-2004, 08:09 PM
SF maybe explain more about what youre talking about, because im at least the 3rd person who doesnt get what youre talking about. if what you say is true, then if you put the bar on the small of your back, it should only move like an inch or two? lol you dont make sense. if you put the bar high on your back, it doesnt go as far down because its on the top of your back. but if it starts out lower on your back, it also goes down lower because its lower on your back. its not a hard concept.

Saturday Fever
09-22-2004, 01:17 PM
OK.

When you're squatting like a powerlifter, there is a severe arch to your back. See the image below named setup.jpg for an example.

Form-wise, a powerlifter sits back, not down. That's the key. If you rest the bar high on the shoulders and sit back, the weight will cause you to drift forward. This is where the straight line is broken and the shortest path is ruined.

With the bar lower on the back and traps, as you sit back, the bar does not cause you to lean forward, preserving the straight up-and-down line and thus keeping the shortest bar path.

chris mason
09-22-2004, 05:51 PM
I agree with you in general SF, but there is no set way for a powerlifter to perform a movement. For example, there are narrow stance squatters and wide stance squatters. There are those that perform the squat with the bar pretty high on their back and still others who hold it as low as possible. It just depends on the individual's strengths and weaknesses.

Saturday Fever
09-22-2004, 05:55 PM
I agree with you in general SF, but there is no set way for a powerlifter to perform a movement.

Oh, I agree.


For example, there are narrow stance squatters and wide stance squatters. There are those that perform the squat with the bar pretty high on their back and still others who hold it as low as possible.

I believe stance dictates bar placement, rather than strengths and weaknesses. Though I suspect we're probly leaning in the same direction.

Big J
09-22-2004, 09:26 PM
I was always told that putting the bar higher on your shoulders makes you lean forward more, and thats what I was referring to. I had just never heard of the "shorter bar path" before, but I'm startin to see where y'all are comin from now though. Still though if the lift is perfect then the bar will travel the same distance correct? I understand the higher bar makes you want to lean forward therefore hendering the lift & I geuss also making a "longer bar path". SO in theory no matter where the bar is sitting a perfect lift would result in the same bar path regardless. Did I pretty much sum things up, or am I still missing something?

biggimp
09-22-2004, 09:33 PM
OK.

When you're squatting like a powerlifter, there is a severe arch to your back. See the image below named setup.jpg for an example.

Form-wise, a powerlifter sits back, not down. That's the key. If you rest the bar high on the shoulders and sit back, the weight will cause you to drift forward. This is where the straight line is broken and the shortest path is ruined.

With the bar lower on the back and traps, as you sit back, the bar does not cause you to lean forward, preserving the straight up-and-down line and thus keeping the shortest bar path.


ok thanks for explaining. now i finally (kind of) get what youre talking about. i was just thinking that you were inferring something totally diferrent, but now i get where youre coming from.

Saturday Fever
09-23-2004, 10:10 AM
SO in theory no matter where the bar is sitting a perfect lift would result in the same bar path regardless.

Well, like I said, stance will dictate bar placement. Defining a perfect lift is difficult. ;)

biggimp
09-23-2004, 09:06 PM
a perfect lift is 3 white lights..... :D