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blkbelt65
08-19-2004, 09:16 AM
Anyone know where I can find stats on PowerLifters ???

I'm looking for Age, Height, Weight, Amount Lifted...That type of thing.

I want to start POWER Lifting and want to know what's out there and Who's doing it!

THanks in Advance!

Ken

Paul Stagg
08-19-2004, 09:32 AM
There are records at the websites of the various federations.

www.usapowerlifting.com is one of them - USAPL is drug tested and single ply gear, wiht IPF lifting standards (a little stricter than some other federations.)

There are a number of powerlifters on this site.

I'm 34, a 220, and my last total (Dec 2002) was 1015. 330 squat, 285 bench, 400 dead. I'll be competing again this fall, my openers will probably be 405/285/405.

blkbelt65
08-19-2004, 10:41 AM
Thanks Paul.

Is that how it's normally done when you compete for Power Lifting; you do all 3(three) events/lifts?

What weight class are you in?

What is singly ply gear? Do you have to wear specific clothing to compete? If so, why? Does it make a difference?

How does the DeadLift Benefit you? I don't do it...YET, so I'd like to know it's benefits.

Thanks Again.

Ken

ElPietro
08-19-2004, 10:53 AM
I've competed so I should be able to answer most of this stuff. My part-time training partner is the VP of powerlifting in Ontario, canada, and he's 46 years old.

If it's a full meet you have to do squat, then bench, then deadlift. All three. There are the odd meet where they will have a "bench only" competition, and I've also heard of deadlift meets as well. But usually a full meet is all three lifts.

I compete under IPF rules as well, so they have guidelines for pretty much everything. You don't have to wear any equipment, but unless it's a very small local meet, they will at least require you to wear a singlet.

The IPF only allows single ply equipment, generally all of it is made from polyester. Just means it's not as thick, and as strong as other materials used, such as denim. Companies that make IPF legal suits and shirts are Inzer, Titan, and Metal, but there are probably others. Those are the main 3.

A bench shirt is simply a really tight shirt, I mean REALLY tight. You generally need at least one other person to help you put it on, and it can take several minutes. Quite often this will not permit you to lift small weight, as it's so tight that you cannot get the bar to touch your chest. Basically, it is forcing your arms together, so as you lower the weight, it gains more tension, so when you start the lift up again, all that tension is released and you get a boost for the bottom to mid parts of the lift. This protects the shoulders, and aids in how much you can do. This varies person to person, anywhere from 20 lb increase, all the way up to 100+ lbs.

Squat suit is pretty much a similar concept. It looks like a singlet, only it's made of the non-stretchy material and is really tight.

Deadlift is a true strength exercise. There's almost no way to cheat on this thing, it's just you and the bar. You are using almost every muscle in your body to perform this lift, and can generally lift quite a bit of weight with it. You will strengthen the legs, lower back, traps, and abs most from this exercise. But you will also get some effort from the lats as well.

If you are thinking of competing, then down the road you should consider equipment, but for now I don't think you should worry about it. The most important things I can say, is start off light, find a powerlifter if you can, and get the form perfect. Most personal trainers will not have the knowledge to judge competition form. You can also simply use a digital camera and take a video of your lifts and check for form. But finding out where some powerlifters train will benefit more. I haven't met a powerlifter yet that isn't more than happy to help novice lifters with form and training advice.

Also, starting out I'd recommend working on strength in the abdominal and lower back muscles. No, 1 billion situps at martial arts is not strengthening your abs. You need to add resistance as well. So cable crunches and dumbell sidebends will help with this. Back extensions can help with the lower back, or pull thoughs. (if you do a search or go to elitefts.com you will find info on all these exercises)

Hope that helps.

ElPietro
08-19-2004, 10:55 AM
Oh, last thing is I wanted to stress once again starting slow, light and working form for a good amount of time. You can get very strong at your age, but you are still almost 40. So any injuries you sustain will not heal like when you were 20. So be careful, as it's easy to get addicted to pushing the envelope every session, and if you go too far you could really set yourself back before you truly begin.

blkbelt65
08-19-2004, 11:01 AM
ElPietro,

What a great informative post!!! I really appreciate your effort in answering my questions in such detail.

blkbelt65
08-19-2004, 11:04 AM
I'd like to find a "partner" to help train w/ me. As I train at home that is a big issue. Do you know of anyone HERE that is in the Richmond, VA. area?

ElPietro
08-19-2004, 11:04 AM
No problem, I have copy/pasted my experience from my first powerlifting meet in the Competitors forum. So you can read that if you wanted a first hand account of all the little details.

Think it's called Toronto Open or somethin like that.

Paul Stagg
08-19-2004, 12:06 PM
Is that how it's normally done when you compete for Power Lifting; you do all 3(three) events/lifts?

**Yup. As ElP said, there are bench only meets, and push pull meets (bench and deadlift)

What weight class are you in?

** 100kg/220.25lb. I weighed in at about 215 or so for my last meet. I'm about 225 now, but can make weight without trouble.

What is singly ply gear? Do you have to wear specific clothing to compete? If so, why? Does it make a difference?

** ElP described it very well above. The IPF allows single ply polyester shirts and suits. They have to be approved, and Inzer, Titan, and Metal all have equipment that is approved. (They all also make equipment that is not IPF legal, but is legal in AFP, IPA, and others). The clothing requirments are in the various rulebooks, but generally you need to wear a singlet (a squat suit is a singlet). You can also wear a belt, knee wraps, and wrist wraps (the lengths are specified). PL gear does make a difference. My best squat without gear is 425. In my suit (an Inzer Champion), without the straps pulled up, I hit a double at 405 with ease. My suit is so tight I get bruises on my hips, and bruises from the leg openings. I haven't used my shirt yet (I train alone, and haven't had a good opportunity to have someone help me get it on). The suit does change my squat groove a little... once I get it figured out, the numbers should go up more.

There are federations that allow the use of double ply denim shirts with open backs, canvas suits with briefs underneath, and even now hybrids where they use denim and poly in the layers to get the benefits of both.

I also want to second the comments ElP made about Plers. In general, they are all very helpful... they'll literally come up to you in the gym once they figure out you are one of them, and give you help any time, everything from a quick spot to form tips to training advice.

IdaMAN
08-19-2004, 12:57 PM
ElPietro, what gym do you train at?

ElPietro
08-19-2004, 01:17 PM
I train at Fitness Connection on Don Mills, between lawrence and eglington, also at Fitness 365 (formerly Monster Gym at 401 & kipling), and at home with my new power rack.

IdaMAN
08-19-2004, 01:19 PM
Ahhh, right on. I am right down town at isabella and Yonge.