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View Full Version : what should I be able to Deadlift?



Brokensword
08-31-2004, 01:54 PM
I'm 5'7", weigh 145lbs. and have about 23% bodyfat, (I'm small, I know) How much should I be able to start to deadlift based on my stats?

debussy
08-31-2004, 02:33 PM
Just start at 135 and work your way up. Whenever you start doing any exercise that is new to you... make sure to start light and stress perfect form.

ericg
08-31-2004, 02:51 PM
Just start at 135 and work your way up. Whenever you start doing any exercise that is new to you... make sure to start light and stress perfect form.

I would start with just the bar if you have never done it before. If you have anyone at your gym that seriously knows his stuff ask him to check your form. The bar may seem light, but check your ego at the door - you will thank yourself in the long run.

debussy
08-31-2004, 02:58 PM
Yeah 135 might be too much... I just picked that because the 45's are a good height to pull from. Maybe you can use those bumper plates for oly lifting.

ericg
08-31-2004, 03:05 PM
Bumper plates are a great idea. They only weight about 15lbs or so i think.

Brokensword
08-31-2004, 07:14 PM
Thanks guys for all the advice. It's good that you mentioned 135 because that's exactly what I had started with yesterday. It didn't seem that heavy to me and I was able to do several reps after the other with it but today my entire lower back feels quite a bit sore as do my rear delts. Personally I think I can handle 145 or more, but I'll keep practicing with the 45's to get my form down properly. Thanks.

London_Guy
09-01-2004, 04:50 AM
I'd say a good long-term target for you would be to dead 1.5-2.0 x your bodyweight.

johnnytang24
09-01-2004, 07:51 AM
Bumper plates are a great idea. They only weight about 15lbs or so i think.

Bumper plates come in a variety of weights (from 5kg training wheels to 25kg). The good thing about them is that you can drop them, and they are all the same diameter (450mm IIRC), regardless of weight.

As for 'how much', it depends on how long you've been lifting, your body proportions, etc., so the only answer is: don't try to find your max on your first DLing session.

Brokensword
09-01-2004, 10:59 PM
I'd say a good long-term target for you would be to dead 1.5-2.0 x your bodyweight.

Thanks for that concrete number there. I think that doing almost 300 pounds will take me quite a while, althought I would hope that by any such point I would be weighing alot more than 145lbs.

Today I tried to up the weigh a bit just to test out what I actually could do and I can still do 155lbs fairly easily without struggling. I think that maybe I can even push it to 165lbs where I would be doing them steadily with good form. And I assume that with Deadlifts, doing your max every rep is the way to go. Or am I wrong? And what would be the standard reps x sets routine for deads be on a leg day? I do barely any legwork anyway, so that day will basically be my Deadlift day.

ericg
09-02-2004, 05:31 AM
Barely do any leg work? If you are getting into PLn then you best be squatting!!

Brokensword
09-02-2004, 03:25 PM
I'm not exactly getting into powerlifting. My main sport is Kickboxing. I already have stronger than average legs with excellent flexebility. I lift weights to benefit my sport and I was told by many people that Deadlifts would work to get me bigger as a whole, so I'm just starting the deadlift thing for that benefit. I do squat, but not often, maybe once a month or two. Sorry about the misunderstanding.

EviscerationX
09-02-2004, 04:38 PM
Once a month or two? That won't do anything...

SW
09-02-2004, 05:20 PM
^^ Very true.

debussy
09-02-2004, 05:55 PM
I already have stronger than average legs

How many times have I heard that before....

Unless you are squatting 405+ I don't think you have strong legs. You don't know the meaning of strong legs until you get under that bar with that much weight on your back. I've done walkouts with 385 and they made me cry like a bitch.

WannabeSmalljjk
09-02-2004, 10:17 PM
Hey Debussy check your mail.

Brokensword
09-02-2004, 11:15 PM
Ok, I may not be able to squat 405 pounds but given the nature of my sport, I am constantly using and strengthening my legs. Also, we don't go for bulk in the legs, we go more for compact power. If I were to gain massive legs, it would be a significant trade off in speed and quickness (different things, believe me). I've been involved in the sport and in martial arts long enough for me to look bottomheavy, which is a problem for me. Meaning, my problem is that I don't have enough upper body strength, especially around my back and Delts despite both muscle groups being essential in punching mechanics and such. So the deadlifts for me would be primarily for back strength and bulk. Not saying that I don't "need" to train my legs, just saying that my training needs for my legs vary greatly from Powerlifters needs and squats would just be in a sense not what I'm going for.

And yes, I do believe that I have stronger than average legs. My legs look HEUUGE and are dispraportionately large in comparisson to the rest of my body and if there was any doubt that my legs are already far ahead of the rest of me, take this into account; When I asked this question of how much should I be able to deadlift I got a response of 135lbs and most agreed that this may be too heavy for a guy of 5'7" and 145lbs. Well, I tried 135lbs and it was not a challenge, so I bumped it up to 155lbs Got a little easier, but I took it up to 165lbs and eventually up to 170lbs where I felt was what was a good place to start. I didn't feel anything up until 165lbs where my back and upperbody felt stress on the lockout. But my legs never once felt any stress and today all I feel is my back being sore. I think that had my legs not been so strong, I wouldn't have been able to even get the 155lbs off the ground.

So, now that I've got the groundwork I will be continuing with the Deadlifts until I can do atleast 1.5 - 2 x my bodyweight. But I will also try to take you guys' advice and I'll try to bump up the Squats to at least twice a month. Thanks you guys, you really are very helpful.

johnnytang24
09-03-2004, 12:27 PM
The size of a muscle doesn't directly translate into strength. Since you do kickboxing, it's even more important to work legs (ie. squats). There are ways of lifting that don't increase muscle mass.

debussy
09-03-2004, 01:10 PM
The size of a muscle doesn't directly translate into strength. Since you do kickboxing, it's even more important to work legs (ie. squats). There are ways of lifting that don't increase muscle mass.

:withstupi

Flying Knight
09-03-2004, 01:31 PM
I would start with just the bar if you have never done it before. If you have anyone at your gym that seriously knows his stuff ask him to check your form. The bar may seem light, but check your ego at the door - you will thank yourself in the long run.
:thumbup: :withstupi

JSully
09-03-2004, 06:43 PM
How many times have I heard that before....

Unless you are squatting 405+ I don't think you have strong legs. You don't know the meaning of strong legs until you get under that bar with that much weight on your back. I've done walkouts with 385 and they made me cry like a bitch.

I squatted 495 for 3 reps the other day. Just picking that weight up on my shoulders felt like I was gonna get squashed, and while I was actually doing the weight I thought my head was going to pop off. lol

As far as deadlifts go, just because someone else said that you should only be able to get so much, doesn't mean anything. I knew this kid that was no more than 145 lbs a freshman in high school with puny legs squatting 405 for reps. And I know other people with massive legs that cant even put up 315 for one. Different people grow different ways, strength, and size and thats all genetics. I complain all the time because I have small legs, but I can squat 500lbs so I guess my legs will be small but strong. I personally do squats 3 times a week, 1 super light workout (15reps), 1 medium workout(6-10reps), and 1 super heavy workout(3-6reps). And just like johnnytang24 said, there are many ways to increase strength without increasing size. If you stayed with a majority 15 reps and above you're legs will grow a little but strength and endurance will go through the roof, as well as speed. The more muscle you have doesn't ALWAYS mean you'll be slower than what you were, its how you train the muscle. I know guys 220+ lbs that can throw 6-8 blows in one second with their hand and can still move their legs quite fast as well.

So take that into consideration. One other thing, the more you do legs, the faster the rest of your body is going to grow to even yourself out to keep symmetry.