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Beavereater
09-18-2004, 07:28 AM
This is long...sorry :windup:

OK...I just started my diet on the 1st of September, and working out about a week and a half ago. I live in Japan where drinking is part of the culture. I have to go out sometimes and drink even though I don't want to, otherwise I compromise my business. I have been able to keep OFF the alcohol but HAD to drink today. Is this gonna really impair my weight loss (September 1st I was at 304lbs) I drank 3 cans worth of beer along with a couple diet cola and vodka drinks. It's only like once MAYBE twice a week where I have to drink. My clients know that I am trying to lose weight and they support me, BUT when they get drunk, they want me drunk.

Question 1: SO...knowing all this, am I in trouble!? On these days I can stick to HIGH protein...or is there something else I can do.

Question 2: There is a Chinese alcohol called Shouchu that EVERYONE in Japan says is healthy...does anyone know this. I know it, and drank it many many times. Is it healthy!? Can you recommend the healthiest alcohol??

Question 3: I was told that I can eat my "craves" food once a week? Is this true?? And if so, should I save these days for drinking!?

I hate to sound like an alcoholic, but in Japan, it REALLY is part of the culture that you can't escape. If I say no to a drink, it's the same as throwing it in there face. Anyway, sorry to go on like this, the beer is still in me!!

Question:

darkdan
09-18-2004, 09:00 AM
1. Maybe a little extra cardio
2. Never heard of it
3. May as well

Personally I wouldn't worry. 3 beers and 2 vodka drinks is between 400 and 600 calories. Unless you're on a super restricted diet don't sweat it.

If you're really worried about it.....just keep drinking till you puke it all out. =) That's how we do it in America!

geoffgarcia
04-03-2005, 10:31 PM
1 No
2 No
3 No

Veritas
04-07-2005, 02:58 PM
Please see the following...

http://www.thefactsaboutfitness.com/research/alcohol.htm

Alcohol calories
Successful weight loss is all about oxidizing (or burning), more
calories than you eat. When they go on a diet, many people choose
low-calorie alcoholic drinks, mainly because they contain fewer
alcohol calories than their regular counterparts.

However, this recent study, published in the American Journal of
Clinical Nutrition, shows that even a very small amount of alcohol has
a large impact on fat metabolism.

Eight men were given two drinks of vodka and lemonade separated by 30
minutes. Each drink contained just under 90 calories. Fat metabolism
was measured before and after consumption of the drink.

For several hours after drinking the vodka, whole body lipid oxidation
(a measure of how much fat your body is burning) dropped by a massive
73%.


Here's why...
Rather than getting stored as fat, the main fate of alcohol is
conversion into a substance called acetate. In fact, blood levels of
acetate after drinking the vodka were 2.5 times higher than normal.
And it appears this sharp rise in acetate puts the brakes on fat loss.

A car engine typically uses only one source of fuel. Your body, on the
other hand, draws from a number of different energy sources, such as
carbohydrate, fat, and protein. To a certain extent, the source of
fuel your body uses is dictated by its availability. In other words,
your body tends to use whatever you feed it.

Consequently, when acetate levels rise, your body simply burns more
acetate, and less fat. In essence, acetate pushes fat to the back of
the queue.

So, to summarize and review, here's what happens to fat metabolism
after the odd drink or two...

1. A small portion of the alcohol is converted into fat.

2. Your liver then converts most of the alcohol into acetate.

3. The acetate is then released into your bloodstream, and replaces
fat as a source of fuel.

Your bodies' response to alcohol is very similar to the way it deals
with excess carbohydrate. Although carbohydrate can be converted
directly into fat, one of the main effects of overfeeding with
carbohydrate is that it simply replaces fat as a source of energy.
That's why any type of diet, whether it's high-fat, high-protein, or
high-carbohydrate, can lead to a gain in weight.

The bottom line?


Even a small amount of alcohol (this study used two servings of vodka
and lemonade) can have a big impact on the rate at which your body
burns fat -- even if the drink is low in calories.

Print Report | FREE Weekly Newsletter

Reference

Siler, S.Q., Neese, R.A., & Hellerstein, M.K. (1999). De novo
lipogenesis, lipid kinetics, and whole-body lipid balances in humans
after acute alcohol consumption. American Journal of Clinical
Nutrition, 70, 928-936

BigDanStud
04-07-2005, 03:13 PM
That was a nice post, answered alot of q's, good post Veritas!

Big Dan

dw06wu
04-07-2005, 03:20 PM
Awesome post Veritas.

AKraut
04-08-2005, 07:53 AM
I would say stick exclusively to diet soda mixers and liqour. Obviously from Veritas post you see that fat loss will halt when you drink. However, if you factor those drinks you have into your total calories for the day it isn't going to send you in the other direction, only hinder your overall progress. If you are really serious about losing fat you should obviously not drink at all, but as you said you can't, so just be as disciplined as possible.

Also, drinking is part of almost EVERY culture, Japan is nothing special.

Big Bas
04-08-2005, 11:56 AM
just pretend you're a lightweight. ACT very drunk after one WEAK drink. then you can all be drunk, and you would have done minimal harm

RaginT
04-08-2005, 01:25 PM
Ok i have a question, i understand the whole prioritizing of the alcohol(acetate). But does this change in what is being burned matter if the person remains in a daily deficit of total calories?

I'd assume not, but correct me if i'm wrong.

Double D
04-08-2005, 08:35 PM
Please see the following...

http://www.thefactsaboutfitness.com/research/alcohol.htm

Alcohol calories
Successful weight loss is all about oxidizing (or burning), more
calories than you eat. When they go on a diet, many people choose
low-calorie alcoholic drinks, mainly because they contain fewer
alcohol calories than their regular counterparts.

However, this recent study, published in the American Journal of
Clinical Nutrition, shows that even a very small amount of alcohol has
a large impact on fat metabolism.

Eight men were given two drinks of vodka and lemonade separated by 30
minutes. Each drink contained just under 90 calories. Fat metabolism
was measured before and after consumption of the drink.

For several hours after drinking the vodka, whole body lipid oxidation
(a measure of how much fat your body is burning) dropped by a massive
73%.


Here's why...
Rather than getting stored as fat, the main fate of alcohol is
conversion into a substance called acetate. In fact, blood levels of
acetate after drinking the vodka were 2.5 times higher than normal.
And it appears this sharp rise in acetate puts the brakes on fat loss.

A car engine typically uses only one source of fuel. Your body, on the
other hand, draws from a number of different energy sources, such as
carbohydrate, fat, and protein. To a certain extent, the source of
fuel your body uses is dictated by its availability. In other words,
your body tends to use whatever you feed it.

Consequently, when acetate levels rise, your body simply burns more
acetate, and less fat. In essence, acetate pushes fat to the back of
the queue.

So, to summarize and review, here's what happens to fat metabolism
after the odd drink or two...

1. A small portion of the alcohol is converted into fat.

2. Your liver then converts most of the alcohol into acetate.

3. The acetate is then released into your bloodstream, and replaces
fat as a source of fuel.

Your bodies' response to alcohol is very similar to the way it deals
with excess carbohydrate. Although carbohydrate can be converted
directly into fat, one of the main effects of overfeeding with
carbohydrate is that it simply replaces fat as a source of energy.
That's why any type of diet, whether it's high-fat, high-protein, or
high-carbohydrate, can lead to a gain in weight.

The bottom line?


Even a small amount of alcohol (this study used two servings of vodka
and lemonade) can have a big impact on the rate at which your body
burns fat -- even if the drink is low in calories.

Print Report | FREE Weekly Newsletter

Reference

Siler, S.Q., Neese, R.A., & Hellerstein, M.K. (1999). De novo
lipogenesis, lipid kinetics, and whole-body lipid balances in humans
after acute alcohol consumption. American Journal of Clinical
Nutrition, 70, 928-936

Can you minimize this effect by starving yourself the next day and ony taking in minimal cals, mainly from protein so that for this whole day you burn the excess acetate, then will begin burning fat again soon.
Obv this will not eliminate the problem, but will it make a significant difference if you happen to drink.

seanthadon
06-24-2009, 12:02 PM
how bad does drinking effect muscle gainning/recovery?

PowerBuilder
06-24-2009, 10:34 PM
Can you minimize this effect by starving yourself the next day and ony taking in minimal cals, mainly from protein so that for this whole day you burn the excess acetate, then will begin burning fat again soon.
Obv this will not eliminate the problem, but will it make a significant difference if you happen to drink.

Starving yourself won't help at all, ask anyone who's ever been on a starvation diet, the loss of muscle mass (associated with starving) will have the end effect that when you try to eat anywhere near normal again you will quickly gain much more than you ever lost, even on a diet that is way below what you ate before you started starving yourself.

There are more problems than those mentioned above:

1. Alcohol is a relaxant so it slows down your metabolism, you won't burn as much of any calories while you are drunk and when you are recovering.

2. It negatively affects protein synthesis, less muscle, less calories will be burned whether you are active or at rest.

3. It lowers testosterone and raises estrogen, this one is obvious.

4. It disrupts Kreb's cycle which plays a key role in fat burning.

5. At seven calories per gram it is very calorie dense.

PowerBuilder
06-24-2009, 10:41 PM
how bad does drinking effect muscle gainning/recovery?

It negatively affects protein synthesis and lowers testosterone as i mentioned above.

However, just don't drink on a regular basis, it's better to binge once a month than to have smaller amounts a couple a times a week (as the article above mentioned, the adverse effects of alcohol start being noticeable at low dosages), and you won't have any problems.