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_-_v_-_
09-29-2004, 07:56 PM
I've posted the following in my journal; but I thought that it might be prudent to post it here as well, if only to increase its exposure. And while I realize that this post may seem somewhat odd devoid of the aforementioned context, I'll do my best to provide all pertinent information.

So, with that out of the way, let us proceed apace:

I need some advice/assistance.

Wow. I bet THAT statement came as a shock to you!

Imagine that, -v- needing help. What a stunner! What a revelation!

I'm attempting to eat more, and to eat that which I haven't eaten in ages. And to a degree I must admit that I'm succeeding. Yet my dietary paradigm has for so long been so disturbed -- considering <1800 calories as normal, when I know full well that, with my history, current situation, and activity level, >3500 is far more appropriate -- that I'm finding it difficult to make additional progress. I find that my culinary options are limited by habit -- that, in other words, I have trouble conceiving of novel meal ideas and, in lieu of cooking something different, I tend to fall back on easily-measured, habituated standbys (2/3 cup oatmeal, 1/4 cup uncooked brown rice, etc...) It almost seems as if it would be easier were I to live in a dorm, as most students do, and simply dole out heaps of food according to appetite -- I know how males my age eat, should eat, and need to eat. I fear that I'm not making myself entirely clear, but I'm not entirely sure how to be more precise. It is not that I desire to binge on junk -- with my allergies, such isn't even an option -- but simply that, when it comes to eating the requisite number of calories, it seems I'd have an easier time of it if I weren't responsible for cooking the food. This is odd. I know. Anyway, that's just rambling nonsense. Let me move on.

What sort of meals do you cook? I'm tired of adulterating my food with a multiplicity of calorie-free substances. I'm sick of trying, in a single meal, every single possible gustatory permutation (one variety of calorie-free butter on this bit of rice, another variety of calorie-free butter on that bit of rice, etc...) I want normality; I want simplicity; I want nondisordered reality. I want to taste food again, not chemical additives, and to appreciate the taste for what it is: the taste of something wholesome, something genuine, something real.

Breakfast ideas? Dinner ideas? Just throw things out there and see what sticks. Granted, without dairy products and nut products, the options will be restricted; but I'll gladly listen to ideas.

Wherefore this request? Something strange that happened last night -- or, more precisely, the last three nights.

I try to eat something before I go to bed. hHe problem is, however, that by the time the late evening rolls around, I'm tired enough that I cannot think clearly, it seems -- it is as if I cannot decide what I want to eat. And so the last three nights I've made the same thing, even though I don't really like it, per se -- I mean, I don't hate it, but it doesn't really taste that good, you know? What was it? Bastardized oatmeal-protein pancakes (1/3 cup oatmeal, 2 eggs, 10 g soy protein powder, vanilla extract, cinnamon, artificial sweetener), topped them with every possible permutation of several sugar-free syrups and calorie-free butters. It's a deeply disordered process; and a depressing sight, I'm sure. First a bit of that butter with this syrup; then this butter with that syrup; then butter with cinnamon and equal and no syrup; etc... And none of it tastes particularly good, but neither does it taste particularly bad. And yet I've done it three nights in a row, simply because I didn't know what else to make, because I couldn't conceive of other options, because, ultimately, I didn't -- and still don't -- know what I wanted or what I liked.

I'm sick of that. It's not food. It's not eating. It's neither. It's simply sick; and whatever else it may be, it's certainly not going to get me to the caloric totals that I need.

I'm not sure I'm making this clear at all. Am I conveying anything at all? Am I making any sense?

Meal ideas? Etc...

_-_v_-_
09-30-2004, 08:44 AM
Bump for thoughts/advice. And I suppose it may help if I clarify the situation somewhat, as I realize that the above post was somewhat disjointed/rambling -- as you may well expect, I was tired, not to mention a bit frustrated, when I wrote it.

When one has lived a certain way for so long -- when one has, for so many years, eaten so many of the very same things -- change becomes exceedingly difficult at levels both conceptual and practical. I have crossed the former hurdle, thankfully; I have accepted the necessity, and the reality, of change; all that remains is merely the mundane quotidia of making the change. And this is where my difficulties lie.

This morning provides, I think, a good example of what I mean. I spent fifteen minutes this morning debating what to have for breakfast. Certainly I wasn't without options -- it was not as if I was bereft of food and attempting to craft a makeshift meal. Indeed, it was almost as if I had too many options; I couldn't decide what I wanted, what sounded good, what I liked. I had no real ideas beyond the old stand-bys. And that's why I'm beseeching some advice.

If I'm going to get the sheer number of calories I know I need, I'm going to have to change my habits; I'm going to have to shatter a rusted and ill-fitting dietary paradigm. I have a rut from which I need to escape posthaste. And I'm open to suggestions: breakfast ideas; lunch ideas; foods sans adulteration, foods as they are and should be.

Does that make things any clearer? Thanks again, all.

ryuage
09-30-2004, 09:12 AM
I think you shouldn't make a life long story in every post and just say, hey I can't eat this or this... but im tired of this and this everyday, what else can I eat???

-me- thinks you should stuff your face with food you CAN eat, load your house with food that you aren't allergic too then heck snack on it all day. I honestly don't find change so hard even living a certain way for a couple years, if you want it that bad you will make the change.

galileo
09-30-2004, 09:35 AM
Already posted in your journal. ;)

_-_v_-_
09-30-2004, 09:43 AM
I think you shouldn't make a life long story in every post and just say, hey I can't eat this or this... but im tired of this and this everyday, what else can I eat???

-me- thinks you should stuff your face with food you CAN eat, load your house with food that you aren't allergic too then heck snack on it all day. I honestly don't find change so hard even living a certain way for a couple years, if you want it that bad you will make the change.

LOL. Dude, if I didn't include in every post an excessive degree of detail -- if, in short, I didn't recapitulate my entire ****ing history -- it wouldn't be a true --v-- post, now would it? It'd be like, well, pizza without cheese, or something.

As for changes: Addictions die hard, man; and that's what this is. Addiction. Pure and simple.

Teh BDK
09-30-2004, 10:18 AM
Not everybody reads his journal.

V, have you tried simply cooking with much higher quality ingredients and changing the manner in which you cook the meal? When I cook 'clean' I basically cook a lean piece of meat but I sear it instead of cooking it all the way through. It keeps the juices in and gives you a different mouth feel, etc. Try eating different vegetables. A meal I've taken to is a very lean cut of beef or lamb seared in a little (very high quality) olive oil, and immediately after cooking it I throw some quartered Maui sweet onions, baby sweet bell peppers, and some mushrooms (either shiitaki or baby bellas) without adding any oil. These vegetables are good enough to eat raw, so I cook them just long enough to cook the mushrooms. I put some (excrutiatingly high quality) balsamic vinegar on them before eating.

Organic vegetables are always better than regular ones. I know you're probably broke like the rest of us but if your sanity is at stake, you may have to sacrifice. High quality produce has more flavor as well as more of everything that makes a vegetable delicious.

The main focus here is the quality of your ingredients. If you buy Extra virgin olive oil that doesn't smell like canola oil, you won't have to use so much. You should also use the same high quality olive oil for everything. The same goes for balsamic vinegar, spices, etc.

Oh, instead of using butter, you could put avocado in with your rice. I know its odd, but you'll wonder why the **** you used butter substitutes in the first place. I don't know, of course, what your fat intake limit is. I'm assuming that you can't eat butter because it's dairy. But what do I know. I'm hypoallergenic.

Bitch.

Relentless
09-30-2004, 10:41 AM
Not everybody reads his journal.

V, have you tried simply cooking with much higher quality ingredients and changing the manner in which you cook the meal? When I cook 'clean' I basically cook a lean piece of meat but I sear it instead of cooking it all the way through. It keeps the juices in and gives you a different mouth feel, etc. Try eating different vegetables. A meal I've taken to is a very lean cut of beef or lamb seared in a little (very high quality) olive oil, and immediately after cooking it I throw some quartered Maui sweet onions, baby sweet bell peppers, and some mushrooms (either shiitaki or baby bellas) without adding any oil. These vegetables are good enough to eat raw, so I cook them just long enough to cook the mushrooms. I put some (excrutiatingly high quality) balsamic vinegar on them before eating.

Organic vegetables are always better than regular ones. I know you're probably broke like the rest of us but if your sanity is at stake, you may have to sacrifice. High quality produce has more flavor as well as more of everything that makes a vegetable delicious.

The main focus here is the quality of your ingredients. If you buy Extra virgin olive oil that doesn't smell like canola oil, you won't have to use so much. You should also use the same high quality olive oil for everything. The same goes for balsamic vinegar, spices, etc.

Oh, instead of using butter, you could put avocado in with your rice. I know its odd, but you'll wonder why the **** you used butter substitutes in the first place. I don't know, of course, what your fat intake limit is. I'm assuming that you can't eat butter because it's dairy. But what do I know. I'm hypoallergenic.

Bitch.

and you tease me about eating well

punkass

galileo
09-30-2004, 12:21 PM
Not everybody reads his journal.

I suppose there's a base level of vocabulary needed to comprehend his choice of diction. You'll get there someday, budes!

fwiw, he dual posted this question and I answered it there first.

ryuage
09-30-2004, 12:24 PM
LOL. Dude, if I didn't include in every post an excessive degree of detail -- if, in short, I didn't recapitulate my entire ****ing history -- it wouldn't be a true --v-- post, now would it? It'd be like, well, pizza without cheese, or something.

As for changes: Addictions die hard, man; and that's what this is. Addiction. Pure and simple.

true. :)

_-_v_-_
09-30-2004, 05:46 PM
Not everybody reads his journal.

V, have you tried simply cooking with much higher quality ingredients and changing the manner in which you cook the meal? When I cook 'clean' I basically cook a lean piece of meat but I sear it instead of cooking it all the way through. It keeps the juices in and gives you a different mouth feel, etc. Try eating different vegetables. A meal I've taken to is a very lean cut of beef or lamb seared in a little (very high quality) olive oil, and immediately after cooking it I throw some quartered Maui sweet onions, baby sweet bell peppers, and some mushrooms (either shiitaki or baby bellas) without adding any oil. These vegetables are good enough to eat raw, so I cook them just long enough to cook the mushrooms. I put some (excrutiatingly high quality) balsamic vinegar on them before eating.



That sounds quite good. I'm going to experiment a bit tonight -- something along those lines, really.



Organic vegetables are always better than regular ones. I know you're probably broke like the rest of us but if your sanity is at stake, you may have to sacrifice. High quality produce has more flavor as well as more of everything that makes a vegetable delicious.

The main focus here is the quality of your ingredients. If you buy Extra virgin olive oil that doesn't smell like canola oil, you won't have to use so much. You should also use the same high quality olive oil for everything. The same goes for balsamic vinegar, spices, etc.

Oh, instead of using butter, you could put avocado in with your rice. I know its odd, but you'll wonder why the **** you used butter substitutes in the first place. I don't know, of course, what your fat intake limit is. I'm assuming that you can't eat butter because it's dairy. But what do I know. I'm hypoallergenic.


Thanks much for the advice, man. In all honesty, I've deferred changing what I purchase / what I eat for putatively financial reasons -- with my allergies, and with californian food prices being what they are, my food bills are already high enough. There's no reason, however, that I can't eat much better than I'm eating without spending a penny more. I just need to purchase different foods and prepare different meals.

I'm going to make something different tonight. We'll see how it goes.

In the meantime, keep those ideas coming! Breakfasts and dinners, particularly. I'm shooting for +3500 calories; and, for once, I want those calories to be from food I can taste for its own sake, not food I've adulterated with a thousand goddamn artificial flavors, syrups, butters, sweeteners, etc...

sublime99
09-30-2004, 06:50 PM
Breakfast

4 to 8oz chicken or round steak
6 egg whites
1/2 cup cottage cheese
piece of toast whole wheat
8oz milk
water

snack

6.5 oz can of tuna
2 pieces whole wheat bread
mayo mustard and honey all 1 tbsp
and 1oz cheese

with a tangerine or bannana
water

lunch

8oz chicken
1/2 cup rice with either 1/2 cup black beans or kidney beans
water

dinner

8oz chicken
1/2 cup cottage cheese
1/2 cup rice or whole wheat pasta if rice add beans and fat free sour cream
if pasta add emerils kicked up tomato sauce 1/2 cup



Trust me 2200 calories full of protein and you will be full i promise

OH and also you can drink crystal light some throughout the day.

_-_v_-_
09-30-2004, 07:29 PM
Thanks, man.

But I've gotta ask -- you seem a bit...protein-centric, no? Any particular reason? I mean, I'm fully aware of the necessity of protein; but that's, well, quite a bit...Where are he carbs?

nep
10-01-2004, 02:38 AM
your syntax gives me a headache. ease up on the adjectives. although its refreshing to see someone with a grasp on the english language

sublime99
10-01-2004, 07:40 AM
There are carbs in there rice ,beans, bread, milk i switch somethings around and eat broccolli, carrots, apples etc etc my theory is i don't believe in all this low carb crap but i believe you have to have enough carbs to where you feel good but not so many that you feel so full and sluggish and sleepy all the time. This is just an example of my diet it changes from day to day and asked for advice. But i will tell you if you want to grow you gotta have the protein!

_-_v_-_
10-01-2004, 09:09 AM
Granted, low-carb is not the way to go; but then, I am aware of no substantial body of literature which supports a protein intake beyond 1g/lb body weight. Now, I'm not saying that one may not accrue certain benefits from a protein intake in excess of 1g/lb, but simply that a fixation upon increasing one's protein consumption beyond this value at the cost of carbohydrate or fat consumption is likely inadvisable.

And besides, at my activity levels, I honestly need quite a bit of carbohydrate -- far more so than I'm currently eating, if the way I feel right now is any indication.

As for my adjectival predilections.... lol. Sorry, man. It's not intentional, I swear. It just comes out like that.

Aspect
10-01-2004, 12:28 PM
BDK's advice to go for high quality foods is sound, and it's good to see someone who apprecaited balsamic vinegar. It really is the food of the gods.

It appears to me that you'll find it far easier to meet your caloric goals by eating tasty food than bland pap. To help with that, I'd say you absolutely need to buy a few things:

- a good selection of spices
- a good selection of herbs - if you can grow some yourself even better (even a window box with half a dozen herbs would be great, water it daily and that's all the care it needs).
- Good quality olive oil and balsamic vineger. You can use a cheaper olive oil for cooking (using decent extra virgin is usually a waste as the heat destroys the delicate flavour, but for dressings etc. use the best you can afford. And balsamic should cost roughly its weight in platinum; it's an extravagance, but if you've tasted a really good balsamic you'll understand).

Now, all this stuff means you can cook really simple foods yet have them taste great. The key is choosing really fresh, good quality ingredients. Try to buy fruit and veg every few days if that's possible, and go for things that really appeal. It's amazing the difference quality of ingredients can make; imagine a limp salad of iceberg lettuce, cucumber, tomato and carrot drowned in vinigrette, compared with some crisp rocket and spinach leaves, baby Pomorino tomatoes and bell pepper, drizzled with extra virgin olive oil and that balsamic vinegar we just discussed.


Anyway, I digress slightly. Buy quality, fresh produce that you like. Try something new every week, for the sake of boredom if nothing else. Realise that a meal can be put together with very little effort (for example, a goat's cheese and grape salad can be gorgeous, and it takes less than 2 minutes to prepare).

As your main issue is with increasing calories, you need to lay off the fat-free butters and sugar-free syrups. What good are they doing you? Keep them for flavour if you must, but you'd be better served by binning the lot and buying some flavoured olive oils. You could also try some flavoured honeys; allow your dressings to both taste good and aid your progress.

Now, as for specific meal ideas, here's just a few thoughts to kick start the synapses:

- Make some "museli" of your own by mixing oats with any dried fruit you like. Add milk and refrigerate for at least an hour, so the whole mass goes "stodgy". Loosen with extra milk, add honey, and top with fresh fruit. You can make a large batch at once, then it's ready to just put in a bowl in the fridge (overnight if need be), and voila - an easy 500-800 calories of tasty goodness

- Any salads you like. Be adventueous. Spinach, peach and parma ham, topped with olive oil? Rocket, baked ciabatta, pancetta and poached egg? Try some different combinations, and be free with the olive oil - it's your best friend.

- Simple dinners are fine. There's nothing wrong with grilling some chicken and having it with a baked potato. But make it a good-quality chicken breast, and add some flavours - rub in some lemon juice, olive oil and herbs (maybe thyme) and griddle it carefully. Run oil into the potato skin before baking it. Simple food can still taste good, if you let it. This applies to steaks, pork, lamb, turkey, chicken, fish... buy whatever you like the look of at the shop.

- "Complicated" dinners can actually be quite simple. For example, how about you get a ciabatta loaf, chop off all the crust and cube the bread (1" cubes). Cut a monkfish tail into 1" cubes too. Toss the lot in some olive oil. Put them on some skewers to make kebabs (alternate monksih and bread cubes), and wrap each kebab with a slice or two of pancetta. Drizzle with olive oil, and bake for 15 minutes. It will look and taste divine, and only needs 5 minutes of preparation.

- Pancetta and parma ham can be your friends. For example, next time you eat salmon try wrapping it with a couple of slices of pancetta before baking it. Tastes gorgeous, and you've just added a couple of hundred calories.

- Make your own pasta sauce. Gently fry a little chopped garlic for 2 minutes in a small amount of olive oil, then add some chopped tomatoes (chop fresh tomatoes yourself, don't use a tin). Bring to a gentle simmer and cook for 30 minutes. At the last minute, stir in some basil. Voila, lovely tomato sauce for your pasta. Or for a baked potato, or to go with fish or chicken or meat or....

- Stews, chilli con carne, stir fry etc. can be made in batches and frozen. DO THIS. Make at least 4 portions of anything like this, eat one and have another the next day, and freeze the other two.

- Plan ahead. Have food available all the time. If you're going to be busy, have stuff that's easy to cook and easy to eat to hand (this is where your frozen meals will come in handy).

- Have good, healthy but calorie-dense snacks available. Nuts would be ideal, but I believe you're unable to eat them? This may limit you, but try to keep things like dried fruit or calorie-dense whole fruits (e.g. bananas) available.

- It's OK to eat bread. Dip it in your best olive oil and choose whole grain breads, and it's even fairly healthy. If you're lacking carbs, this is perhaps a good place to start.

Ultimately, your palette will need to be retrained as you've lived on such a limited diet. It will take time to learn what you like, but the best place to start is with high quality ingredients cooked to enhance their flavour. Spices and herbs beat processed sauces every day, and if you learn to love olive oil you can bump your calories up considerably with a healthy food.


One final but important point, which you will know already but is worth being reminded of. Your body has adapted to eating very few calories. That means your stomach and digestive system are trained to handle this volume of food. Be progressive in adding to this. You wouldn't hit the gym and double all your weights in one session, you'd build up over time. Likewise, build up to eating more food; add a couple of hundred daily calories every week or so, and you will adapt to the increased intake. Digestive tract distress isn't pleasant, so it's far better to take the extra time and become accustomed to your new eating habits.

Good luck with it!

_-_v_-_
10-01-2004, 12:52 PM
BDK's advice to go for high quality foods is sound, and it's good to see someone who apprecaited balsamic vinegar. It really is the food of the gods.

Yes, it is. I add it to nearly everything. Red wine vinegar is also indispensable. As is Saigon cinnamon, for that matter. Without those three things, I think I'd die.



It appears to me that you'll find it far easier to meet your caloric goals by eating tasty food than bland pap. To help with that, I'd say you absolutely need to buy a few things:

- a good selection of spices
- a good selection of herbs - if you can grow some yourself even better (even a window box with half a dozen herbs would be great, water it daily and that's all the care it needs).
- Good quality olive oil and balsamic vineger. You can use a cheaper olive oil for cooking (using decent extra virgin is usually a waste as the heat destroys the delicate flavour, but for dressings etc. use the best you can afford. And balsamic should cost roughly its weight in platinum; it's an extravagance, but if you've tasted a really good balsamic you'll understand).


I've all the above; I just haven't made the effort to change. And yes, I've some good balsamic vinegar (my mother purchased, for my birthday, a small bottle of vintage balsamic -- was fifty dollars, I think). Of course, I also have ordinary, unremarkable balsamic as well; no need to waste such ambrosial nectar, of course.

I've both high-quality olive oil and less expensive olive oil, all extra virgin, of course.




Now, all this stuff means you can cook really simple foods yet have them taste great. The key is choosing really fresh, good quality ingredients. Try to buy fruit and veg every few days if that's possible, and go for things that really appeal. It's amazing the difference quality of ingredients can make; imagine a limp salad of iceberg lettuce, cucumber, tomato and carrot drowned in vinigrette, compared with some crisp rocket and spinach leaves, baby Pomorino tomatoes and bell pepper, drizzled with extra virgin olive oil and that balsamic vinegar we just discussed.



I've never scrimped when it comes to vegetables/fruits -- with my allergies, I can't really afford to. I also happen to love salads/vegetables, perhaps to my detriment (I tend to load up on fibrous vegetables in lieu of calorically-significant foods).

Again, I don't want to sound as if I were culinarily feckless, as if didn't know the difference between a pot and a pan. It's more that I became so fixated upon the same calculated, habituated things that I never experimented with anything else. Over time, my habits became, of course, increasingly disordered, increasingly weird... That needs to change.



Anyway, I digress slightly. Buy quality, fresh produce that you like. Try something new every week, for the sake of boredom if nothing else. Realise that a meal can be put together with very little effort (for example, a goat's cheese and grape salad can be gorgeous, and it takes less than 2 minutes to prepare).


I agree. Last night I made quite a good -- indeed, even gourmet, if I do say
myself -- meal for very little money / effort. Note that all cheeses are verboten for me, of course; I'm fatally allergic to all dairy products, nut products, shellfish products, some fruits, some vegetables, and a few grains.



As your main issue is with increasing calories, you need to lay off the fat-free butters and sugar-free syrups. What good are they doing you? Keep them for flavour if you must, but you'd be better served by binning the lot and buying some flavoured olive oils. You could also try some flavoured honeys; allow your dressings to both taste good and aid your progress.


I've never used honey much -- it's that evil "sugar," of course. And when I was normal, I'd use syrup; but I haven't been normal in a very long time.



Now, as for specific meal ideas, here's just a few thoughts to kick start the synapses:

- Make some "museli" of your own by mixing oats with any dried fruit you like. Add milk and refrigerate for at least an hour, so the whole mass goes "stodgy". Loosen with extra milk, add honey, and top with fresh fruit. You can make a large batch at once, then it's ready to just put in a bowl in the fridge (overnight if need be), and voila - an easy 500-800 calories of tasty goodness



I'd been doing something similar, based upon, I think, something I'd seen you mention earlier. The only problem, I found, was that such a meal lended itself far too easily to the very disordered adulteration I've been attempting to avoid -- lots of artificial sweetener to make the soy-milk/protein powder mixture palatable, lots of cinnamon, sugar-free maple syrup on this bite, more artificial sweetener on that bite, trying every possible taste permutation, etc....


- Any salads you like. Be adventueous. Spinach, peach and parma ham, topped with olive oil? Rocket, baked ciabatta, pancetta and poached egg? Try some different combinations, and be free with the olive oil - it's your best friend.


Great ideas here. Thanks much. I've always loved salads, though admittedly I need to vary my idea of what constitutes "salad."


- Simple dinners are fine. There's nothing wrong with grilling some chicken and having it with a baked potato. But make it a good-quality chicken breast, and add some flavours - rub in some lemon juice, olive oil and herbs (maybe thyme) and griddle it carefully. Run oil into the potato skin before baking it. Simple food can still taste good, if you let it. This applies to steaks, pork, lamb, turkey, chicken, fish... buy whatever you like the look of at the shop.


I have to admit that, right now, I need to watch the grocery budget -- californian food prices are a bitch. So I'm all about packages of frozen chicken breast, buying fish/turkey/chicken in bulk, etc... Meat down here is pricey as hell.

But I agree. I just need to rediscover the taste of food itself.



- "Complicated" dinners can actually be quite simple. For example, how about you get a ciabatta loaf, chop off all the crust and cube the bread (1" cubes). Cut a monkfish tail into 1" cubes too. Toss the lot in some olive oil. Put them on some skewers to make kebabs (alternate monksih and bread cubes), and wrap each kebab with a slice or two of pancetta. Drizzle with olive oil, and bake for 15 minutes. It will look and taste divine, and only needs 5 minutes of preparation.


You'd have loved my dinner last night. But remember, cheese and processed meats are going to be out of the question for me.


- Pancetta and parma ham can be your friends. For example, next time you eat salmon try wrapping it with a couple of slices of pancetta before baking it. Tastes gorgeous, and you've just added a couple of hundred calories.

Deli meats aren't an option, due to my allergies -- I can't guarantee that either A) the deli slicer has been cleaned sufficiently of milk/cheese residues to render it safe; or B) the processing/preservation process did not involve cross-contamination with any of my numerous allergens.



- Make your own pasta sauce. Gently fry a little chopped garlic for 2 minutes in a small amount of olive oil, then add some chopped tomatoes (chop fresh tomatoes yourself, don't use a tin). Bring to a gentle simmer and cook for 30 minutes. At the last minute, stir in some basil. Voila, lovely tomato sauce for your pasta. Or for a baked potato, or to go with fish or chicken or meat or....


I need to buy some regular pasta -- whole wheat tends not to agree with me, for some reason. Why've I been avoiding regular pasta? I thought it was high-GI, when, of course, it isn't.



- Stews, chilli con carne, stir fry etc. can be made in batches and frozen. DO THIS. Make at least 4 portions of anything like this, eat one and have another the next day, and freeze the other two.


I do quite a bit of cooking in advance, though I have to admit that I'm not too fond of stews. As for ground meats, I have to make my own -- store-ground meats tend to bother my allergies, probably due to insufficient cleaning of the grinder.



- Plan ahead. Have food available all the time. If you're going to be busy, have stuff that's easy to cook and easy to eat to hand (this is where your frozen meals will come in handy).


I've been doing this for four years. The only difference now is, of course, I'm going to be packing real food with me, not 1/3 cup oatmeal + a few almonds + 84 g (measured uncooked) chicken breast.


- Have good, healthy but calorie-dense snacks available. Nuts would be ideal, but I believe you're unable to eat them? This may limit you, but try to keep things like dried fruit or calorie-dense whole fruits (e.g. bananas) available.


Almonds, cashews, and sunflowers are acceptable. Others are lethal.


- It's OK to eat bread. Dip it in your best olive oil and choose whole grain breads, and it's even fairly healthy. If you're lacking carbs, this is perhaps a good place to start.


Most breads are out of the question, as they contain either nuts or milk. Ezekiel sprouted wheat breads, however, are fine.


Ultimately, your palette will need to be retrained as you've lived on such a limited diet. It will take time to learn what you like, but the best place to start is with high quality ingredients cooked to enhance their flavour. Spices and herbs beat processed sauces every day, and if you learn to love olive oil you can bump your calories up considerably with a healthy food.

One final but important point, which you will know already but is worth being reminded of. Your body has adapted to eating very few calories. That means your stomach and digestive system are trained to handle this volume of food. Be progressive in adding to this. You wouldn't hit the gym and double all your weights in one session, you'd build up over time. Likewise, build up to eating more food; add a couple of hundred daily calories every week or so, and you will adapt to the increased intake. Digestive tract distress isn't pleasant, so it's far better to take the extra time and become accustomed to your new eating habits.


Thanks so much, man. By the way, do you have any breakfast ideas? That tends to cause me the most difficulty, honestly.

I really appreciate the post. Look forward to hearing your thoughts.
Good luck with it![/QUOTE]

pruneman
10-01-2004, 01:29 PM
hey -v-

here's something I love:

Chop and saute onions and peppers. Cook a box of penne pasta. Drain the pasta and add the onions and peppers. Add a good bit of olive oil and some Frank's red hot hot sauce, and there you have it. Throw in some grilled chicken and it's a complete meal.

I usually put a tub of feta cheese in it, but i guess that won't work for you.

_-_v_-_
10-01-2004, 02:50 PM
Frank's red hot on pasta?

Wow. You're hard-core, man :)

pruneman
10-01-2004, 04:03 PM
just enough to give it a little flavor. Trust me...its amazing stuff and easy calories.

Teh BDK
10-01-2004, 11:44 PM
Franks Red Hot on EVERYTHING.
I agree with all of that except I use Fruttati Extra Virgin, which has a deep, bold taste instead of a light fruity taste, so you can use it for absolutely anything. Most people would only use this for sauces and dips but...meh. Light and fruity? Not for me.

The more you look at higher quality oils and spices the more variety you'll find. There are numerous varieties of olive oil beyond the pressing.

Here's a little snack or addition to a meal.
Mix 1:3 balsamic to olive oil (change the mix depending on the pungency of the vinegar, we usually make about a cup and a half or so) and add 1/3 cup fresh chopped basil and 1/2 fresh, finely chopped red onion, and two cloves of minced garlic. Mix it up and let it sit in the fridge for a little while. About two-four hours should be fine.
Get a couple (4) fresh tomatoes(depending on how much of the oil/vinegar mix you prepared), preferrably organic hot house tomatoes (usually found on a vine which may or may not be fake vines, next to the freak in sandals and bike shorts at the grocery store) and an avocado or two. Quarter the tomatoes and cut the avocado into small chunks;the definition of small is left to your discretion. Add this to the basil mix and let it sit for an hour or so.
Dive in. It'll keep in the fridge for about a week, but only if you forget that it's in there.


Have you cracked open that vintage balsamic?

Aspect
10-02-2004, 01:57 PM
Breakfast ideas? Hmm, my own breakfasts are usually either my homemade museli and fruit, or contain foods you aren't able to eat (nuts, dairy etc.) I'm struggling to think of "interesting" breakfasts that don't contain at least one "no-no" for you.

That said, there's no reason you have to eat "breakfast foods" at breakfast. It's just another meal, so you can eat whatever you like. For example, grilled salmon and steamed rice is widely eaten for breakfast in Japan; no reason you can't do the same. Cold meat (from intentional leftovers, not deli meat) can be a nice change of pace, with a baked potato or sweet potato; sounds weird at breakfast, but it can be surprisingly enjoyable. If you're limited for time in the mornings you can always set the oven timer so the potato's ready when you wake...

I'm sorry I'm not much more use; as I say, I'm so used to using foods you can't have that I struggle to think of ideas which don't use them. A quick flick through a couple of recipe books hasn't actually helped much; I personally like Italian food (as you'd probably guessed), and it's amazing how many dishes use cheese or deli meats.

If I think of anything else I'll post it here.

_-_v_-_
10-02-2004, 03:06 PM
Breakfast ideas? Hmm, my own breakfasts are usually either my homemade museli and fruit, or contain foods you aren't able to eat (nuts, dairy etc.) I'm struggling to think of "interesting" breakfasts that don't contain at least one "no-no" for you.

That said, there's no reason you have to eat "breakfast foods" at breakfast. It's just another meal, so you can eat whatever you like. For example, grilled salmon and steamed rice is widely eaten for breakfast in Japan; no reason you can't do the same. Cold meat (from intentional leftovers, not deli meat) can be a nice change of pace, with a baked potato or sweet potato; sounds weird at breakfast, but it can be surprisingly enjoyable. If you're limited for time in the mornings you can always set the oven timer so the potato's ready when you wake...

I'm sorry I'm not much more use; as I say, I'm so used to using foods you can't have that I struggle to think of ideas which don't use them. A quick flick through a couple of recipe books hasn't actually helped much; I personally like Italian food (as you'd probably guessed), and it's amazing how many dishes use cheese or deli meats.

If I think of anything else I'll post it here.

See what I mean? I'm experiencing the same problem as you are -- you're so used to foods I can't have that it's difficult to conceive of other options; while, simultaneously, I'm so used to the same foods I've eaten for the past four years that I find it difficult to conceive of other options. It's the same phenomenon :)

As for the change of pace: That's not a bad idea, honestly. Typically, though I like to use my leftovers as meals for when I have to be out and about for classes, as I won't be able to cook then -- I have time to cook at breakfast, so I save my pre-prepared meals for when I won't be able to cook.

And BDK: Yep, cracked it open; it's damn, damn good. Like fine wine.

As if I'd know, though. I don't drink :)