PDA

View Full Version : The PizDoff diet!! Please read and comment



PizDoff
10-06-2004, 12:14 PM
Now first of all, I hardly claim to be an expert on nutrition, but I've tried to compile a list of the stuff I live by...

If you guys would be so kind to go and read my thread on this forum and give me feedback here I would really appreciate that.


Edit:

Yeap, mods aren't liking me linking to another forum, though it hardly threatens their existance....I posted the original thread because I continue to update it, and so people could see the following discussion that took place and my answers.



Anyways, here is the current of what I wrote there. PM me if you want the original thread:



Some of this is original work, some stuff modified off the net from various sources.
I do not claim this as my own original work. Sources from books, internet, and magazines.

*This post will be updated as information follows.


PizDoff's Daily Eating Rules

Frequency of Meals and General Guidelines
Eat 4-6 times a day. Eating more frequently improves energy level, promotes fat burning, and avoids catabolic state where body is in 'starvation' mode. Don't miss breakfast; your body does not like running on empty. There is NOTHING wrong with eating right before bedtime. Eat foods that are as natural as possible; whole, unrefined and unadulterated. Eat some raw or 'living' foods. If cooking is required, cook as little as possible to preserve enzymes and other nutrients. Eat food that is as 'poison-free ' as possible. Chemicals in your food, water and air harm your health. Don't take megadoses of vitamin or minerals. Try to stop eating before you are completely full.


-Track calories and nutritional breakdown at www.fitday.com
No I never use it, haha.

-Make sure protein intake>fat intake.
Carbs are generally inconsequential to me, but attempt mostly 'good' carbs. Eat complete (containing all the essential amino acids), lean protein with each meal.
with your fat intake split between saturates (e.g. animal fat), monounsaturates (e.g., olive oil), and polyunsaturates (e.g. flax oil, salmon oil).


-Have a balanced diet.
Adapted from: http://www.wannabebig.com/article.php?articleid=19

Protein is the building block of muscle. This does not mean protein will build muscle on it's own. When you exercise (i.e., weight training), your muscles become damaged. Your body uses protein to repair the muscles, making them stronger and eventually bigger. Examples include lean beef, chicken, fish, eggs, beans, cottage cheese, soy, etc.

Carbohydrates are the main source of energy for our bodies. There are two types of carbohydrates: simple and complex.

Simple carbohydrates are digested quickly. Many contain refined sugars and few essential vitamins and minerals. Examples include fruits, fruit juice, honey, molasses, maple syrup, and sugar.

Complex carbohydrates take longer to digest and are usually packed with fiber, vitamins and minerals. Examples include vegetables, breads, cereals, legumes, and pasta.

Fat is essential for body insulation, internal organ protection, nerve transmission and metabolising fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E, K). Remember - there is good fat and bad fat. Good fats, or Essential Fatty Acids, are found in flaxseed oil, safflower oil, natural peanut butter, nuts, and many types of fish. All saturated fat should be avoided as much as possible.



Liquids
Drink water. Lots of it. When you are thirsty, drink. But when doing a higher level of strenuous level of activity, drink more pre-workout and try to get some in during workout.
Pop, coffee, urine does not count and should be generally avoided.
Green tea is good as well, powerful antioxidants and anti-carcinogenic properties.
Most fruit drinks are mostly sugar carbs.
[i]More discussion below...[/b]


Cheat Meals
Cheat meals, or 'unhealthies' are generally fine. But not too often, at most a couple times a week. 'Unhealthies' includes carbonated beverages (pop), candy, junk food, 95% of McDonald's foods, amazingly fatty Burger King fries, fries in general, anything soaked in saturated fat. Careful with pizza, microwave dinners and instant foods, their higher levels of sodium need to be balanced out by drinking more water.

Low-glycemic carbs throughout the day. Only time high-glycemic carbs are taken in on purpose are pre-,post-workout. Ensure that your carbohydrate intake comes from fruits and vegetables. Exception: workout and post-workout drinks and meals.
Potatoes, yams, brown rice are examples of low-glycemic foods..

Avoid bleached flour products, nutrients destroyed/denatured by whitening process. Try to get mostly whole wheat bread, retains more nutrients, lower gylcemic-index as well.

Meats
Salmon - Fresh or canned salmon is one of the best sources of the celebrated Omega-3 fatty acids, which can help prevent heart attacks. Try to get wild salmon more, lower level of PCBs and tastier.
Tuna - Low fat, high protein. Some negatives discussed below.
Chicken, turkey and apparently emu are all examples of low fat meat products.

Fruits and vegetables.
Think colour, the more colourful one have the most nutritional benefit. Dark ones, and colourful ones! Stuff like iceberg lettuce has almost no nutritional value; Romaine is much more nutritional.
Carrots - Beta carotene. Vitamin A
Broccoli - Phytochemical sulforaphane, beta-carotene (good for the eyes and immune system, among other things), fibre and vitamin C.
Blueberries, cranberries - antioxidative properties.
Banannas - Good source of quick carbs, post-workout. Has potassium which helps prevent cramping.
Ground flaxseed - High in Omega-3 fatty acids.
Garlic - Contains allicin, a phytochemical that may lower cholesterol and make blood platelets less sticky, cutting the risk of clots.
Spinach - Iron and folate, a B vitamin.
Tomatoes - Especially cooked or processed ones, can lower the risk of some cancers and heart disease. Experts attribute this to lycopene, a potent antioxidant and the pigment that makes tomatoes red. I particularly like to snack on cherry tomatoes and SUCK THE LIFE OUT OF THEM!!! BAHAHAAHAHH!!!
Peppers - Antioxidants! Great snack to munch on raw as well.
Mushrooms - Antioxidants again AND polysaccharids! Of particular fame is the Reishi Mushrooms. GO eat them!

PizDoff
10-06-2004, 12:17 PM
I also got an email back from someone I sent that to:


i didn't have time to read it all yet, but i have 3 comments so far:
1) fruits and veggies are a source of simple sugars but they DO contain many vitamins and minerals.
2)saturated fat intake should not be equal to mono and poly. In fact, you should have more poly than anything else. There are 2 essential fatty acids, omega 3 and omega 6. They are both polyunsaturated. Every other type of fat can be made from these. Therefore you dont need to eat saturated or mono (although mono is healthier than sat).
3) fish oil extracts are NOT recommended (in fact, i think you need a prescription). Too much omega 3 can result in thin blood. Eskimos dont die of heart attack, but they die of bleeding to death because of their high fish intake.



I think this guy is taking nutrition at Uni, anyone have any other comments on what he wrote?

geoffgarcia
10-06-2004, 12:28 PM
i didn't have time to read it all yet, but i have 3 comments so far:
1) fruits and veggies are a source of simple sugars but they DO contain many vitamins and minerals.
2)saturated fat intake should not be equal to mono and poly. In fact, you should have more poly than anything else. There are 2 essential fatty acids, omega 3 and omega 6. They are both polyunsaturated. Every other type of fat can be made from these. Therefore you dont need to eat saturated or mono (although mono is healthier than sat).
3) fish oil extracts are NOT recommended. Too much omega 3 can result in thin blood. Eskimos dont die of heart attack, but they die of bleeding to death because of their high fish intake.

I think this guy is taking nutrition at Uni, anyone have any other comments on what he wrote?
he is right. fruits and veggies are also a good source of fiber and phytochemicals (of which there are 10k +)

I'm in agreement that you shouldn't take in equal parts of fats. your sat's should def. be much much lower, ideally less than 15g per day. ratio's needn't apply here, if your taking 20g or 150g, you still dont want more than 15 from sat.
As for the mono fats being uselesss I disagree

Monounsaturated fat is believed to lower cholesterol and may assist in reducing heart disease. Like polyunsaturated fat it provides essential fatty acids for healthy skin and the development of body cells.

Monounsaturated fat is also believed to offer protection against certain cancers, like breast cancer and colon cancer.

Monounsaturated fats are typically high in Vitamin E, the anti-oxidant vitamin which is usually in short supply in many Western diets.

Cold pressed extra virgin olive oil, if not over-heated, provides a range of phyto-chemicals and phenols which help to boost immunity and maintain good health.

while its true that to much fish oil isn't great, you REALLY have to overdo it to take in that amount. 10g per day is super safe and ideal for everyone. 20g is still safe.

If you want a lot more info on nutrition look in my uselss info link in my sig, its got a poop ton of info

Isaac Wilkins
10-06-2004, 12:35 PM
As Geoff said, he's factually right on all counts.

I agree with the fruit statement.

I don't agree with the saturated fat statement in that you shouldn't eat it. I suppose in a perfect world, fine. However, some saturated fat isn't at all bad. Just don't pound it down.

And he's correct that the fish oil can thin the blood. As Geoff said, it really takes more than what most people take, and the benefits with some use overwhelm the negatives. It can happen with very high doses, though.

PizDoff
10-06-2004, 12:43 PM
Replied to him in that thread, I'll copy paste it over.


I also got an email back from someone I sent this to:


i didn't have time to read it all yet, but i have 3 comments so far:
1) fruits and veggies are a source of simple sugars but they DO contain many vitamins and minerals.
2)saturated fat intake should not be equal to mono and poly. In fact, you should have more poly than anything else. There are 2 essential fatty acids, omega 3 and omega 6. They are both polyunsaturated. Every other type of fat can be made from these. Therefore you dont need to eat saturated or mono (although mono is healthier than sat).
3) fish oil extracts are NOT recommended (in fact, i think you need a prescription). Too much omega 3 can result in thin blood. Eskimos dont die of heart attack, but they die of bleeding to death because of their high fish intake.

I do agree with the first point.

Second point, I don't really bother remembering or paying attention to types of fats anymore.
Due to me not personally am not at risk for heart attack, and avoiding certain foods like fries I will already have less intake of the 'bad' fats. And I exercise regularly too! :)

Third point, never heard of it before. Turns out fish oils DO indeed thin the blood.
But my counterpoint to this is that, some of us living in an North American culture do not eat enough fish, and eat too much red meat, which has more artery clogging fats. I know people on Tylenol to help keep their blood thin and avoid heart attacks. An easy sign of blood being too thin would be frequent bleeding noses...

I uncovered some interesting information with a quick search.


dietary fish oil supplements unquestionably can extend the lives of subjects with heart disease


Also at high doses (10 grams per day or higher), the fish oils had adverse effects„increased bleeding time and gastrointestinal side effects were common, and immune system competence was threatened. Results from other controlled trials suggest that low doses of fish oils can effectively save lives, and with minimal adverse effects.


Cell Membranes, Endothelia, and Atherosclerosis
The Importance of Dietary Fatty Acid Balance (http://www.thorne.com/altmedrev/fulltext/fattya1-3.html)

Further reading and reference:
Catch of the Day: Fish Oils (http://www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/columnnn/nn980128.html)



Thoughts?

PizDoff
10-06-2004, 12:46 PM
Whoa, didn't see your replies when I was writing my own.
Thanks for it though guys!

PizDoff
10-12-2004, 03:28 PM
Top!!!

shootermcgavin7
10-12-2004, 05:53 PM
Also at high doses (10 grams per day or higher), the fish oils had adverse effects„increased bleeding time and gastrointestinal side effects were common, and immune system competence was threatened. Results from other controlled trials suggest that low doses of fish oils can effectively save lives, and with minimal adverse effects.



10g a day is a lot for any supplement.

PizDoff
05-01-2005, 12:08 AM
This guy actually joined the board through me now, hah! :)

spanky33
05-01-2005, 12:27 AM
who's that lame ma****a?

dissipate
05-01-2005, 03:14 AM
i don't think anyone on this board has bled to death yet from taking fish oil caps :P