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Beholder
10-26-2004, 01:12 PM
Why do some people only use egg whites when most of the calories and protein are in the yolk? I love the full egg's and it makes me nice and full during the morning with a nice boatload of calories to boot, what is the big deal with eating the yolk??

Stray
10-26-2004, 02:00 PM
There's two arguments to be made about it - I'm in the "eat the whole damn thing" camp.


Supposedly your blood cholesterol isn't affected by dietary cholesterol - some argue that its a contributing factor.



Mmm eggs.

geoffgarcia
10-26-2004, 02:55 PM
a single egg accounts for 2/3 of the daily recommend allowance for a healthy person. Its a full daily allowance for someone with a high cholesterol level.


High cholesterol levels in food is caused mainly by the fats that you get from the food. However, not all types of fat are bad.

Polyunsaturated and unsaturated fats are good fats that cause the liver to produce less harmful LDL cholesterol and more protective HDL cholesterol.

Saturated fats raise your LDL (bad) cholesterol level more than anything else in the diet. Eating too much saturated fat is the main reason for high cholesterol levels and a high rate of heart attacks, since cholesterol builds up in the arteries and blocks the free flow of blood in your body.

High cholesterol foods are mainly found in all animals and animal products, for example, egg yolks, meat, poultry, fish and higher fat milk products.


Eggs Cholesterol (mg)
Egg, whole, raw, 1 large = 213mg
Egg, whole, raw, 1 medium = 187mg
Egg, whole, raw, 1 extra large = 247mg
Egg yolk, raw, 1 large = 213mg
Egg white, raw, 1 large = 0mg
Egg, whole, fried, 1 large = 211mg
Egg, whole, hard-boiled, 1 large = 212mg
Egg substitute, liquid, 1/4 cup = 1mg


Cholesterol daily limit is 300-mg set by the American Heart Association (AHA)


After analyzing eggs from 200 suppliers representing more than 60 percent of the egg industry, researchers at the U.S. Department of Agriculture, together with the industry's Egg Nutrition Center, found that the average large egg contains only 213 milligrams of cholesterol, or about 20 percent less cholesterol than the 274 milligram figure that has been-quoted since 1976.

The main reason for the new findings, says the chief of the USDA's Nutrient Composition Laboratory, Gary Beecher, Ph.D., is that scientists now have more precise methods of analyzing cholesterol than they did back in the late 1960's, when they made their initial determinations about the cholesterol content of eggs. In addition, it may be that chickens are now producing more eggs; as hens are pushed to lay more, the cholesterol content of their eggs generally drops.

When researchers at Pennsylvania State University's nutrition department purchased eggs without the special label, as well as eggs that purportedly contain only 195 milligrams of cholesterol, and then analyzed the two varieties, they found that the regular eggs averaged 204 milligrams cholesterol, whereas the so-called lowered-cholesterol eggs contained anywhere from 206 to 288 milligrams.

Vido
10-26-2004, 03:27 PM
a single egg accounts for 2/3 of the daily recommend allowance for a healthy person. Its a full daily allowance for someone with a high cholesterol level.

Cholesterol recommendations are BS because dietary cholesterol and blood cholesterol are entirely different things. Why the FDA doesn't acknowledge this is beyond me.

The only reason I would eat egg whites over the whole egg is if I was on some sort of calorie-restricted diet. The white DOES contain half the protein and is only about 17 calories, whereas a whole egg is anywhere from 70-90 calories. That means, on a calorie basis, 4-5 egg whites = 1 whole egg (and 4-5 egg whites is a lot more protein than 1 whole egg).

geoffgarcia
10-26-2004, 03:35 PM
Cholesterol recommendations are BS because dietary cholesterol and blood cholesterol are entirely different things. Why the FDA doesn't acknowledge this is beyond me.
The AHA (american heart association) doesn't acknowledge it either
Eating foods that contain cholesterol (called dietary cholesterol) raises blood cholesterol.
http://www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=4547


Blood Cholesterol vs. Dietary Cholesterol (http://health.howstuffworks.com/cholesterol2.htm)
About 85 percent of your blood cholesterol level is endogenous, which means it is produced by your body. The other 15 percent or so comes from an external source -- your diet. Your dietary cholesterol originates from meat, poultry, fish, seafood and dairy products. It's possible for some people to eat foods high in cholesterol and still have low blood cholesterol levels. Likewise, it's possible to eat foods low in cholesterol and have a high blood cholesterol level.

So, why is there so much talk about cholesterol in our diet? It's because the level of cholesterol already present in your blood can be increased by high consumption of cholesterol and saturated fat in your diet. This increase in dietary cholesterol has been associated with atherosclerosis


Saturated fat, which can be found in animal or vegetable-based foods, has more of an effect on blood cholesterol level than cholesterol does.
http://www.ohiohealth.com/facilities/mcconnell/weightmanage/details/dietaryfacts.htm

RBC13
10-26-2004, 03:35 PM
The protein is in the white my friend. There is a language in which the work for perfect protein is the same as egg white. 3.5/16 white 2.5/55 yolk. That's about 4-5 times as much protein per cal in white.

Vido
10-26-2004, 03:43 PM
That stuff just proved my point Geoff. 85% of our blood cholesterol we have zero control over, and of the other 15%, more is related to saturated fat (and trans-fat as well) than dietary cholesterol.

Vido
10-26-2004, 03:45 PM
The protein is in the white my friend. There is a language in which the work for perfect protein is the same as egg white. 3.5/16 white 2.5/55 yolk. That's about 4-5 times as much protein per cal in white.

That's true, so if you're looking to increase protein intake (and cost isn't an issue), you'd want to eat just egg whites. However, the white is pure protein, while the yolk has protein, fat, vitamins, and minerals. In other words, if you don't eat the yolk, you're missing out on a lot of stuff.

geoffgarcia
10-26-2004, 04:18 PM
That stuff just proved my point Geoff. 85% of our blood cholesterol we have zero control over, and of the other 15%, more is related to saturated fat (and trans-fat as well) than dietary cholesterol.
you missed the next line in that quote...
"the level of cholesterol already present in your blood can be increased by high consumption of cholesterol and saturated fat in your diet"

If you over consume on dietary cholesterol, satfat and transfat, you will INCREASE the amount of blood cholesterol that your body naturally produces!

Vido
10-26-2004, 04:24 PM
you missed the next line in that quote...
"the level of cholesterol already present in your blood can be increased by high consumption of cholesterol and saturated fat in your diet"

If you over consume on dietary cholesterol, satfat and transfat, you will INCREASE the amount of blood cholesterol that your body naturally produces!

I realize that dietary cholesterol can play a role in determining blood cholesterol, but it is a negligible one. That quote doesn't prove anything to me because it could be that high consumption of cholesterol increases your blood cholesterol by 1%, whereas saturated fat could be 50%...who knows. Also, if you think about foods that are high in saturated fat, many of them are also high in cholesterol, so you don't really know what is causing what. To prove this to any extent, one would have to conduct a study on a high cholesterol/low saturated fat food and its effects on blood cholesterol.

Beholder
10-26-2004, 04:46 PM
So basically, by me having 5 scambeled eggs in the morning with a glass of non-fat milk and 2 pieces of WWtoast with natty PB on me isnt going to kill me early? :p

Stray
10-26-2004, 07:51 PM
Not unless your geriatric, no.

Beholder
10-26-2004, 08:57 PM
yayness