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View Full Version : Refined sugar vs. cortisol



TTT
10-27-2004, 05:13 PM
I understand that 'refined' sugar is not popular with a lot of you, but I was studying biochem the other day and cortisol production is one of the long-term effects of hypOglycaemia. I realise that your body can produce glucose through gluconeogenesis, and break down more complex carbs into glucose, etc. However, when you're training really hard, wouldn't it be good to have some sugar (and indeed, most of the energy drinks probably do contain a fair amount of either glucose or sucrose, which is pretty fast-absorbing too)? I guess if you minimise your workout time, you'd be decreasing the production of cortisol, but surely some glucose (best) or sucrose (almost as good) would be okay too?

TTT
10-27-2004, 05:26 PM
Another thing is, my notes said growth hormone is also produced as a result of hypoglycaemia? Is this right? Why would your body want to grow if it's starving? I don't get it

Adam
10-27-2004, 05:45 PM
Its common knowledge to have a carb drink while working out.

TTT
10-27-2004, 11:22 PM
So, the only reason everyone here is against sugar is because of the whole glucose intolerance/homeostasis issue? Or what is it that they're against?

Adam
10-27-2004, 11:29 PM
well, sugar is 50/50 glucose/fructose. I think fructose can only be absorbed by your liver and all extra gets either burnt as energy or stored as fat, meaning none goes into glucagen production.

TheGimp
10-28-2004, 11:37 AM
Glucose and dextrose are fine for pre and post workout (or during) where the goal is to replenish muscle glycogen. In other situations however, sugar is empty calories and can cause overeating by spiking blood sugar.

Vido
10-28-2004, 12:41 PM
Or what is it that they're against?

It's not good for you, plain and simple. Take 1 cup of oats (approximately 60g carbs) and compare it to 60g table sugar (basically pure carbohydrate). Now, aside from the different effects on insulin and sustained energy (and many other things), one is simply healthy and the other is not.

Lots of things bodybuilders do are not the healthiest choices. However, that doesn't mean one should just forgo any efforts of trying to eat healthy, in an attempt to get as big as possible.

kolanut
10-28-2004, 02:29 PM
Another thing is, my notes said growth hormone is also produced as a result of hypoglycaemia? Is this right? Why would your body want to grow if it's starving? I don't get it

When I go on a ketogenic diet (>80mg/dl BG) my hair gets thicker, skin gets darker, etc. I always wondered if it had anything to do with an increase in growth hormone. Hmmm...

TTT
10-31-2004, 03:07 AM
Interesting. Ok well cheers for all the input.