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View Full Version : proper form on OH press to hit delts? (read this)



the_hall
10-30-2004, 03:03 PM
OK,,i just read an article. It said that when you do an overhead press you should start with your arms by your sides and go up till your upper arm is parallel to the floor. I always thought that you start parallel and go up till the dumbells touch???

Now im confused??

http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/likness25.htm


A common mistake is to think that working from upper arms parallel to fully extend keeps tension on the shoulder joint (similar to working the chest only to parallel). This is not true. In reality, once your upper arms move beyond parallel, the majority of angle change takes place about the elbow joint, making this mostly a triceps movement. It is the range of motion from the bottom (when your elbows are almost directly beneath your shoulders) to parallel (when your elbows are at the same height as your shoulders) that the most tension is applied to the shoulder joint.
Again, there is no "proper" range of motion to follow, but if you are working shoulders only and do not wish to involve the triceps, you can work the limited range of motion from the bar completely lowered (elbows below shoulder) to the bar at about the top of your head (elbows same height as shoulder; upper arms parallel to the ground).
As another element to consider, don't forget tension. We have seen how joint alignment can help explain tension. An incline bench press complicates the angle of the movement and shifts tension to the shoulders. A side raise for shoulders is a great example of how form can dictate the function of the exercise. If you perform a side raise with a rigid wrist (grasping the dumbbells firmly and keeping the wrist straight) your forearms actually assist your shoulders, and less tension is placed upon the shoulder joint. There is nothing wrong with this and it allows for heavier weight to be handled.
If you perform a side raise with a "limp wrist" where you allow the hand to "hang down" while grasping the weight, so that the wrist is bent at the top of the movement, the wrist no longer performs work, and tension is shifted to the shoulder joint. Try this with a weight you typically perform side raises at, and you'll notice the difference - you should get a pretty impressive burn! There is no reason why we wouldn't want to work the wrists, but if you are targeting the wrists with forearm flexions and extensions, letting them go limp during exercises like curls and side raises can help shift tension to the muscle that you are targeting so that the wrists are not the "weak link."

pusher
10-30-2004, 04:44 PM
Again, there is no "proper" range of motion to follow, but if you are working shoulders only and do not wish to involve the triceps, you can work the limited range of motion from the bar completely lowered (elbows below shoulder) to the bar at about the top of your head (elbows same height as shoulder; upper arms parallel to the ground).

Starting point for DB press is usually elbows below shoulders with BD's at about shoulder height. End point is about when the weights touch OH. All this says is if you want to take the tris out of the press more, then stop the movement when your arms are at about parallel to the floor. No big deal really.

chris mason
10-30-2004, 04:55 PM
Hmm, how to say this nicely...

That article is bull****!

Your shoulders are being worked through the entire ROM in a press of any type. Relative stress may vary depending on the portion of the ROM but that does not mean you should only do this partial they are advocating.

Perform full presses and you will realize the boulder-like shoulder development you are after.

Titanium_Jim
10-30-2004, 08:57 PM
but if you are targeting the wrists with forearm flexions and extensions, letting them go limp during exercises like curls and side raises can help shift tension to the muscle that you are targeting so that the wrists are not the "weak link."
Have you ever tried letting your wrist go limp during curls? Try it and tell me how a broken wrist feels.

Kiaran
10-30-2004, 09:28 PM
lol That article is lame. First off, yeah, no sh*t more 'tension' is placed on the shoulder joints when your elbows drop below the shoulders. Keyword "tension". This doesn't mean it works the muscle group better, it's just harder on the joint. And yeah, shoulders work through the entire ROM on a shoulder press. It's not called a tricep press after all. Also, a "limp wrist" on lateral rai-...ah excuse me..."side raises"? This "shifts tension" to the target muscle? WTF?! More like ruins your wrists and leaves you with toothpick forearms. Not to mention the fact that this is total bullsh*t and does NOT work the target muscle better. Anyway...do em' like http://www.exrx.net shows. They aren't full of crap like so many articles out there are. Oh yeah, and "pretty impressive burn!"...? What's that all about...I'm looking for a pump, not a burn.

Pringlewheels
10-31-2004, 04:07 AM
Yes, the limp hand thing is an atrocious idea


All musicians are told NEVER to bend the wrist while the tendons are under tension, always keep straight. Im sure weightlifters enjoy non-destroyed fingers the same way musicians do

ryuage
10-31-2004, 05:15 AM
sounds like a good way to injure your wrist...