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abwowang
11-04-2004, 06:02 PM
Ok.. trans fat is bad for you.
I know its in a lot of deep fried foods and even cookies and candy bars.. but how do u kno which ones have trans fat.. which ones dont?.. will it tell u in the ingredient thing?

txterry
11-04-2004, 06:30 PM
Look for "Hydrogenated" "Partially Hydrogeneted" and or course "Trans Fats"
Also add up the grams of fat to see if there are any missing. Manufacturers use this deceptive practice to hide trans fats, they will be able to do so till 2006.

blackss
11-04-2004, 07:30 PM
crap i'm sorry, i replied on the wrong page :P

to 4 day split? whats a split?

i quit drinking coke and carbinated crap, and i'll try to eat more i'm 6'1'' and 140 pnds
i need to understand more

when you are "growing" how do you muscles feel? does it hurt when you push on them? you can feel the pain when you're using them? does that mean that they are growing? and that means i should rest and let them grow? then when it is gone i should work out some more?

waynis
11-04-2004, 07:51 PM
I read it takes months for the effects of trans fat to leave your body.

txterry
11-04-2004, 10:52 PM
Here are some of the top offenders. Number on left is grams of transfat per 200 calories.
This is not a complete list. Most fast food products contain transfats, as do donuts, some backed goods, dried noodle soups, toppings like cool-whip and dips.

9.7 "Shortening, industrial, soy (partially hydrogenated ) for baking and confections"
6.9 "Margarine, industrial, non-dairy, cottonseed, soy oil (partially hydrogenated ), for flaky pastries"
6.2 "Margarine, 70% vegetable oil spread, soybean and soybean(hydrogenated)"
6.1 "Oil, vegetable, industrial, canola (partially hydrogenated) oil for deep fat frying"
4.3 Burger King breakfast: Hash Brown Rounds
3.4 "Cookies, chocolate sandwich, with extra creme filling"
2.7 "Cereals ready-to-eat, KELLOGG'S, TONY'S CINNAMON KRUNCHERS"
2.6 Burger King side order: French Fries
2.5 "McDONALD'S, French Fries"
2.1 "Cereals ready-to-eat, KELLOGG, KELLOGG'S CRACKLIN' OAT BRAN"
1.8 Burger King dessert: Dutch Apple Pie
1.7 "Crackers, saltines (includes oyster, soda, soup)"
1.2 "Beef sausage, pre-cooked"
1.1 "Beef, ground, 70% lean / 30% fat, raw"
1.1 "Oil, industrial, palm kernel (hydrogenated), filling fat"
1 "Beef, ground, 75-80% lean meat / 25% fat, raw [hamburger]"
0.9 "Beef, ground, 80% lean meat / 20% fat, patty, cooked, broiled [hamburger, ground chuck]"
0.9 "Bologna, beef"

abwowang
11-06-2004, 12:51 AM
wow.. ground beef has trans fats?.. ouch

Titanium_Jim
11-06-2004, 01:49 AM
Bologna is filthy.

ryuage
11-06-2004, 08:16 AM
i dont think ground beef has trans fats... the fattier cuts contain more saturated fat, but if you fry it up in some oil... then you'd have some trans fats.

waynis
11-06-2004, 09:41 AM
I don't see how ground beef could have trans fats unless it was heavily processed. I usually buy 96% lean beef with no hormones and minimally processed. Taste like crap but I just put a good layer of mayo, lettuce and tomato. :D

bologna is just crap. artery clogger

txterry
11-06-2004, 10:32 AM
I don't see how ground beef could have trans fats unless it was heavily processed. I usually buy 96% lean beef with no hormones and minimally processed. Taste like crap but I just put a good layer of mayo, lettuce and tomato. :D

bologna is just crap. artery clogger


I rinse my lean ground beef under hot water after cooking to remove as much of the saturated fat as I can.

I did not think either that Ground beef would have any transfat. Here are some interesting titbits:

http://www.womenshealthmatters.ca/centres/cardio/living/nutrition.html

Trans fat is formed when liquid oils are hardened through a process called hydrogenation. A small percentage of trans fats can also be found naturally occurring in animal products. Trans fat has been shown to raise blood cholesterol


Something from the Washington State Beef commission .. so its a plug for beef, but an interesting read on CLA.
http://www.wabeef.org/Nutrition/ALaCarte.aspx

A recent Gallup Poll showed that 31 percent of people are making an effort to reduce trans-fatty acids in their diet. But, most people may not realize that all trans-fatty acids, which are found in a variety of foods, are not created equal. There is a significant difference between man-made and naturally occurring trans-fatty acids.

Some simple ABC’s to remember about TFA’s

All trans-fatty acids are not created equal.

Beef contains naturally occurring trans-fatty acids, which are very different from man-made trans-fatty acids—and, half the fatty acids in beef are monounsaturated fatty acids, the same heart-healthy kind found in olive oil.

Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is a naturally occurring trans-fatty acid that has been shown to have positive health benefits.

“Man-made trans-fatty acids found in snacks and fried foods act very differently than those that occur naturally in meat and dairy products,” according to Martha Belury, Ph.D., R.D., member of the Council for Women’s Nutrition Solutions, professor of nutrition and trans-fatty acid researcher at The Ohio State University. “In general, naturally occurring transfatty acids have positive health effects, and some may even help decrease the risk of heart disease, cancer and diabetes.”

waynis
11-07-2004, 06:08 PM
so beef has naturally occuring trans-fatty acids or do some add trans fatty ingrediants when processed?

muscle chic
11-07-2004, 06:29 PM
Bad Fats
Saturated Fats




Bacon & Bacon grease

Butter (stick, whipped, reduced-fat)

Coconut

Cream & half-and-half

Cream cheese

Ice cream

Lard & salt pork

Palm & palm kernel oil

Bad Fats
Trans Fats




Hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated fats

Margarine (stick)

Nondairy creamers

Shortening

HemiVision
11-08-2004, 08:11 AM
so beef has naturally occuring trans-fatty acids or do some add trans fatty ingrediants when processed?

Practically no trans-fatty acids are naturally occuring. The rare exceptions are not relevant here.

txterry
11-08-2004, 08:54 AM
so beef has naturally occuring trans-fatty acids or do some add trans fatty ingrediants when processed?

OK. I have the answer to this now. The confusion arises because there are 2 deifnitions for trans fats:

1.
trans fat is made when manufacturers add hydrogen to vegetable oil--a process called hydrogenation. Hydrogenation increases the shelf life and flavor stability of foods containing these fats

2.
FDA's regulatory chemical definition for trans fatty acids is all unsaturated fatty acids that contain one or more isolated (i.e., nonconjugated) double bonds in a trans configuration. Under the agency's definition, conjugated linoleic acid would be excluded from the definition of trans fat.

So Id would have to say that beef (without anything added) does not contain transfat.

waynis
11-08-2004, 10:58 AM
So Id would have to say that beef (without anything added) does not contain transfat.

I would agree.

Maxgain
11-09-2004, 06:22 AM
so can food manufacturers pass off trans fats under the nutritional info as unsaturated fats which people would think were good for them?

txterry
11-09-2004, 06:52 AM
Yes. Whats worse tho it is a fat, they dont even have to label it as un, poly or sat fat any at all!
Heres an example
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v479/txterry/factlabel.gif
"This Nutrition Facts label shows 5 grams of fat of which 1 gram is saturated fat. What are the other 4 grams? Perhaps 2 or 3 grams of trans fat? Why doesn't the trans fat have to be listed like the saturated fat? This is deceptive labeling, which the FDA will continue to allow until 2006."

waynis
11-09-2004, 12:16 PM
yes i've seen that in labels. They show the saturated fat but not any other sort of fat. Definetly could contain trans fat. but also you have to watch what you eat and know what would typically have trans fat in. Obviously look at the ingrediants for hydrogenated oils.

Bruise Brubaker
11-09-2004, 01:02 PM
Bad Fats
Saturated Fats
Coconut


Coconut = healthy


One possible reason that the saturated fat in coconut had no harmful effect on the islanders, Dr. Enig proposes, is the lauric acid. Approximately 50% of the fatty acids in coconut fat are lauric acid. Lauric acid is a medium chain fatty acid, found naturally in mother's milk. Lauric acid has the beneficial function of being formed into monolaurin in the body. Monolaurin is the antiviral, antibacterial, and antiprotozoal monoglyceride used by the body to destoy lipid-coated viruses such as HIV, herpes, and influenza.


More recently researchers have recognized that the ratio of LDL to HDL is more important than the number by itself. Dr. Enig's studies show that a diet including coconut oil while having a higher level of LDL, it is counter balanced by a higher level of HDL.