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View Full Version : getting better WITHOUT protein powders etc.



vanfreak
11-08-2004, 12:05 AM
Hi everyone:
I haven't posted in a while, but I have been busy- I started working out with a trainer and the results have been interesting to say the least.
First thing- I have stopped taking protein powders and drinks etc. about three weeks ago.The results of that have been interesting.I'm just as big muscle wise , and I am losing the stubborn fat I couldn't otherwise get rid of...I'm happy with how I am looking or beginning to look.
Am I maybe getting enough protein from my regular diet?Are Protein Powders essential for everyone?I generally don't count every calorie etc. when eating , but I try to eat sensible and avoid sugar and fat.My regular diet includes lots of cottage cheese[1%] eggs, meat and chicken ,.... multigrains and I don't eat junk food[ aside from an occassional coconut bun] I also try to space my meals every two to three hours.
so is it necessary to have protein powder?

Vido
11-08-2004, 12:21 AM
Protein powder is food. If you're eating enough protein-rich foods, you won't need the powder.

Shao-LiN
11-08-2004, 12:52 AM
No it is not necessary. There is no magic in protein powders.

txterry
11-08-2004, 01:26 AM
Sounds like the powders were just adding extra calories to your diet which were being stored as fat, while your body got rid of the extra protein it didnt need.
Sounds like you have a good handle on your diet. You might want to keep the powder around for the rare time you miss a meal.

Ironmover
11-08-2004, 04:27 AM
agree with txterry. you seem dialed in, I use the powders AFTER workouts only and this seems to work for me. IMHO most eat far to much protein and if it's not used for muscle growth it can just come on as FAT.

Vido
11-08-2004, 11:14 AM
agree with txterry. you seem dialed in, I use the powders AFTER workouts only and this seems to work for me. IMHO most eat far to much protein and if it's not used for muscle growth it can just come on as FAT.

It's less likely to be stored as fat than fat or carbs, so if you're going to do overdo any of the three, it should be protein.

vanfreak
11-08-2004, 10:21 PM
You know its funny,
Everyone and everything pushes the protein powders and shakes etc.Nobody makes it clear that if you get enough from your diet your okay.Oh well business is business.
But now I'm curious about something else- if I am getting adequate protein what should I do post workout? Drink some OJ?Then have dinner or lunch?
Or a Banana?e.g. how necessary is a post workout drink if there is adequate proetin in my diet?
I am going to Post some thoughts on working with a trainer on the other board....
Thanks to all who replied!

Vido
11-08-2004, 10:23 PM
But now I'm curious about something else- if I am getting adequate protein what should I do post workout? Drink some OJ?Then have dinner or lunch?


Just schedule it so that a portion of that "adequate protein intake" is being ingested post-workout.

txterry
11-08-2004, 10:42 PM
My opinion based on currently accepted thinking

You of course need protein to grow muscles. The protein should come from food and posssibly supplements as an additional source.

How much total protein you need is controversial. Ive heard:
50grams a day for the avg person (non-bodybuilder)
Minimum of 0.8grams per lb of bodyweight per day (bodybuilder)
500grams a day (competitive bodybuilder)

There is a 'window of opportunity' for up to one hour after your workout within which you should consume protein (not carbs or fats), preferably a fast-acting one such as whey.

The body can enter a catabolic state during sleep where it may burn protein. It is therefore desirable to have a slow acting protein source before bed like Casein, natty Peanut buter, Cottage Cheese and perhaps milk which stay in your stomach for many hours and reduce the catabolic effects.

It is harder for the body to convert excess protein to bodyfat. So a high protein diet is recommended over one high in carbs and fat if you are trying to lose bodyfat or 'cut'

Cortisol, insulin and growth hormone seem to play a part in protein synthesis.

Vido
11-08-2004, 10:58 PM
Good post terry.

txterry
11-08-2004, 11:29 PM
Thanks Vido!
Oh yeah and I should add this.

Excess protein can lead to the following. IMO most healthy people consuming reasonable amounts of protein should not be too concerned about these:

Food Allergies,
Dehydration,
Osteoporosis,
Stress on liver and kidneys,
Kidney stones

This is why bodybuilders drink plenty of water with proteins, take calcium supplements, and go on refeeds occasionally.

iLUDEd
11-09-2004, 01:36 PM
protein powders are a supplement, they supplement your current diet if you need it (which is not always the case).. if you get enough protein in through your diet then you should be fine

Mercuryblade
11-09-2004, 11:40 PM
The body can only absorb roughly only 30g of protein in a digestive cycle, and getting ample supplies of nutrients are just as important as supplying your muscle with enough protein to expand. Eat those leafy greens that taste really bitter, they look like they should be only eaten by rabbits (but the have a ridiculous nutrional value), but with a good dressing they aren't so terrible, (I highly recommend Annie's brand Low-Fat Raspberry Vinegarette). Also try and get most of your fats from fish oils and nuts, don't shy away from red meat, as long as its lean its fine, and as long as you are getting protein with every meal, and you eat as often as you say you do, you should be doing just fine.

Vido
11-10-2004, 02:38 AM
The body can only absorb roughly only 30g of protein in a digestive cycle

Wrong tuttut

Songsangnim
11-10-2004, 10:24 AM
It's less likely to be stored as fat than fat or carbs, so if you're going to do overdo any of the three, it should be protein.



True. To the OP be aware that 'a calorie is a calorie, regardless of source' thing is not true. A calorie from fat is much more likely to be stored as bodyfat than one from protein and carbs.

Mercuryblade
11-10-2004, 01:49 PM
Wrong tuttut

How much then?

Vido
11-10-2004, 02:22 PM
How much then?

A limit has not been established (far greater than 30g for sure though), but your body is very efficient at using what you give it.

snow
11-11-2004, 12:01 AM
My doc told me that the amino acids in weight gainers can be potentially harmful to you, particularly your brain, but I can't find an article via google to save my life (no pun intended). :rolleyes:

txterry
11-11-2004, 12:45 AM
Your doctor's had too many amino acids....

But seriously Ive not heard of that claim before.
The positive effects of protein even in supplements far outweight any negative effects. Of course anything in excess can be harmful.

snow
11-11-2004, 01:14 AM
I also read this in my nutrition book for school, but unfortunately I sold it back. What positive effects do protein supplements/ weightgainers bring?

snow
11-11-2004, 01:23 AM
http://wannabebigforums.com/showthread.php?t=46670&highlight=protein

txterry
11-11-2004, 01:55 PM
I also read this in my nutrition book for school, but unfortunately I sold it back. What positive effects do protein supplements/ weightgainers bring?

Im gonna put protein supplements in a different class from weight gainers. Im currently using protein supplements to help lose weight.
Off the top of my head some of the advantages are:

1. Convenience - no cooking or heating
2. Fast absorbtion (Whey)
3. Slow absorbtion (Casein)
4. High protein to carb/sugar/fat ratio for cutting
5. Storage - Easy to carry around and store, no need for refrigeration

I'll say that its preferable to get all your protein requirements in food while maintaining your calorie goals. But I find that near impossible to achieve, so I add about 2-3 scoops of whey to my daily intake.

snow
11-11-2004, 04:12 PM
I don't know if I would put them in different classes. Don't they both have high amounts of protein, and many of the same amino acids?

txterry
11-11-2004, 09:39 PM
Yes but weightgainers usually have lots of extra carbs and therfore calories, in the form of sugars. Some bodybuilders on here will add dextrose to their regular protein supplement to make it a 'weightgainer' during bulking.
I'll admit that the terms are used loosely.