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View Full Version : Powerlifting for strength, then Bodybuilding for definition?



SW
11-18-2004, 10:41 PM
Have you guys ever done a couple of routines to get pure strength, then went to more reps and sets for definition? I just got done doing this and I'll tell you guys, it's good.

I bulked for a couple of months during heavy lifting, gained all sorts of strength, had a bit of a layoff, lifted hard again but with more reps and sets and now see definition along with my strength. This is the best definition I've ever had. I'm about to go to a really heavy and intense PL routine now, and I'll try it again for even better results. Have you guys done something like this and how did it go?

geoffgarcia
11-18-2004, 10:51 PM
or you could try to mix the two together, doing a routine using sets of 10-5-2 or vice versa, 2-5-10

Right now I'm doing 10-8-6 and I've been quite happy with the strength gains compared to my more traditional 10-10-10 routines

PowerManDL
11-19-2004, 07:22 AM
No.

There's no need to make the two so exclusive.

Adam
11-19-2004, 07:24 AM
training is for strength
diet is for definition
I trian like a powerlifter and eat similar to a bodybuilder so i can keep my bodyfat fairly low.

WillKuenzel
11-19-2004, 03:30 PM
training is for strength
diet is for definition
I trian like a powerlifter and eat similar to a bodybuilder so i can keep my bodyfat fairly low.

Exactly. I've seen some of the more elite powerlifters (not the super heavies) and they're ripped. Look at the guys in the weight classes below 200lbs in either powerlifting and oly lifting and you'll see that even heavy weight trains definition. Its just a matter of diet as to how much of the muscle you've gained shows.

PizDoff
11-19-2004, 05:00 PM
I'm with Adam

SW
11-19-2004, 06:22 PM
I do train every other routine for strength and the other for definition. It does take a while to switch muscle tendencies between the 2 though.

WillKuenzel
11-19-2004, 07:36 PM
A muscle doesn't know the difference between training for strength or definition. It knows to contract or not to contract. How a muscle shows is based on the level of bodyfat covering it. If there is less bodyfat caused by proper dieting then the muscle will show.

If you really want to get down to it, look up sarcoplasmic hypertrophy vs. myofibrillar hypertrophy. Training for strength can, to a certain extent, increase muscle definition more than higher rep routines.

Take this article for instance:
http://www.dolfzine.com/page216.htm

It does mention that it is less likely that you'll get size in training at lower rep ranges for strength but if you are eating enough, you'll grow regardless. With myofibrillar hypertrophy, this is actually the contracting units of the muscle. If you increase these you'll tend to get deeper striations and more noticeable definition, whereas with sarcoplasmic hypertrophy you're just increasing the surrounding area of a muscle without actually getting the contracting lengths to grow. While the latter does create size quicker, the size gained tends to be a bit smoother and less defined than the former.

SW
11-20-2004, 08:02 AM
Good post.

I thought that a muscle gets used to training for definition (of course it doesn't know it).

For instance: If you were to do 2 months of 2x10 training, then go to 2x3 much heavier training, wouldn't it take time for your muscles to adjust and, how do I put this, "kick in" to actually work better with the newe PLing? It's just the impression I've got lately around here.

Regenvelc
11-21-2004, 02:17 PM
10

Right now I'm doing 10-8-6 and I've been quite happy with the strength gains compared to my more traditional 10-10-10 routines


Thats what I do, with a 12 for the first set of any bodypart to do a quick warmup and get it going.