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View Full Version : Study now shows we are all damaging our health!



Maxgain
11-23-2004, 03:20 PM
I am sure they are most likely on about fat gain but just in case.
From Medscape:


Nov. 9, 2004 (New Orleans) A lean individual who gains more than 15 pounds in 15 years has a higher risk of developing metabolic syndrome than an overweight individual who maintains a stable weight, according to findings from a study presented here during the American Heart Association 2004 Scientific Sessions.

A consistently stable body mass index (BMI) will likely result in stable triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, insulin, and blood pressure levels, announced Donald M. Lloyd-Jones, MD, ScM, assistant professor of preventive medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, Illinois.

Over the course of 15 years, Dr. Lloyd-Jones and colleagues followed 1,277 male and 1,208 female patients (average age of 25 years at baseline) who were participants in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study. Subjects were stratified into three groups according to baseline BMI: 20.0 to 24.9; 25.0 to 29.9; and 30.0 to 34.9. BMI and measures of metabolic syndrome were measured at baseline and at years 2, 5, 7, 10, and 15.

Patients were further categorized on the basis of whether they gained weight during the course of the study. The "gain" group consisted of patients who gained more than 15 pounds during the 15-year study, whereas those whose BMI remained stable or decreased represented the "stable" group. The investigators assessed metabolic syndrome risk throughout the study.

Dr. Lloyd-Jones reported that 18% of patients were able to maintain or decrease their BMI, whereas 82% of subjects ended up in the gain group. This latter group had "steadily worsening levels of all risk factors," he said. Patients in the stable group had virtually unchanged risk. At the end of the study period, 3.6% of subjects in the stable group had metabolic syndrome, while 18.4% of those in the gain group had developed the syndrome.

"The most important thing we found was that regardless of baseline weight, risk factors didn't change much if weight remained stable," Dr. Lloyd-Jones told meeting attendees.

For those who gained weight, triglyceride levels increased by 4.31 mg/mL per year, HDL cholesterol levels decreased by 0.58 mg/dL, glucose levels rose by 0.30 mg/dL, insulin levels increased by 0.27 g/mL, systolic blood pressure rose by 0.32 mm Hg, and diastolic blood pressure rose by 0.57 mm Hg per year all significant differences from baseline. "This means that triglycerides will increase by 65 points in 15 years. That's a lot," Dr. Lloyd-Jones noted.

"For those patients who are overweight at baseline, the first goal is weight stabilization," Dr. Lloyd-Jones recommended. "The next goal would be weight loss."

Panel moderator Jorge Plutzky, MD, assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School in Boston, Massachusetts, said, "I would underscore that maintaining weight is crucial.... When you see all the obesity in the young...and one quarter of the population is overweight..., in most of those cases, you can just substitute metabolic syndrome [for obesity]."

"Lean people at baseline who increased their weight had similar increases in risk factors to people who were heavy at baseline who gained weight. Those lean people are on a very dangerous track," Dr. Lloyd-Jones told Medscape.

AHA 2004 Scientific Sessions: Abstract 3567. Presented Nov. 8, 2004.

Reviewed by Gary D. Vogin, MD

ryuage
11-23-2004, 03:27 PM
uhh.. 15 lbs of what... 15 lbs of fat is different from 15 lbs of muscle.

Manveet
11-23-2004, 07:26 PM
uhh.. 15 lbs of what... 15 lbs of fat is different from 15 lbs of muscle.

that is damn true.

Frozenmoses
11-23-2004, 07:38 PM
Science can eat a d*ck.

JTyrell710
11-23-2004, 07:41 PM
i think its just stating that your body reacts better to being overweight on a stable line (it learns how to cope maybe) than if you were lean and become overweight..
im fairly sure its not talking about muscle.

RBC13
11-23-2004, 08:01 PM
Even if you gained mainly muscle, if you do no cardio that would put a lot of stress on your heart too. Maybe its getting at that too.

usertim
11-23-2004, 08:07 PM
I am sure they are most likely on about fat gain but just in case.
From Medscape:


Nov. 9, 2004 (New Orleans) A lean individual who gains more than 15 pounds in 15 years has a higher risk of developing metabolic syndrome than an overweight ..............

..............
who were heavy at baseline who gained weight. Those lean people are on a very dangerous track," Dr. Lloyd-Jones told Medscape.

AHA 2004 Scientific Sessions: Abstract 3567. Presented Nov. 8, 2004.

Reviewed by Gary D. Vogin, MD


What?

JTyrell710
11-23-2004, 08:14 PM
sure it puts more stress on your heart, but all those things aren't related to your heart are there.

you know what else puts more stress on your heart? running. you know what puts stress on your muscles? lifting weights... stress isn't always bad- now of course thats a horrible analogy, but there's a point in there somewhere...I swear.

waynis
11-23-2004, 08:15 PM
what a stupid worthless study. At a average age of 25- add 15 years to that and your 40 years old. YOur growing old. Of course your metabolism isn't going to work like it used to. And if you gained 15 pounds of fat and were not active of course your body isn't going to respond postively to that!!!! uh... LOL

Maxgain
11-24-2004, 06:59 AM
what a stupid worthless study. At a average age of 25- add 15 years to that and your 40 years old. YOur growing old. Of course your metabolism isn't going to work like it used to. And if you gained 15 pounds of fat and were not active of course your body isn't going to respond postively to that!!!! uh... LOL

It was compared against people who had not gained weight were 15 years older also. I wouldnt call a 15 year study of 3,000 people useless. While it is most likely for fat gain the study specifically mentions an increase in BMI leads to this effect which can be fat or muscle. Most likely they just weighed the people and did not determine if it was fat or muscle gain and published the average result.

waynis
11-24-2004, 09:07 AM
the results are common sense though. that's why I call it a waste of time. Also yes I believe they just wieghed them and did not determine LBM. If they determined how much was muscle... then the study would mean something.

Bruise Brubaker
11-24-2004, 10:53 AM
I think the results of this study is more aimed at fat people who goes on stupid diets 3 months, lose 1 gazillon pounds, and then gain it again during the rest of the year.

It's better not to be a yoyo.

I guess it can applies to a certain measure to bodybuilders who bulk and cut, but bodybuilders train and eat well and gain mostly muscles, so I believe that ultimately what the average bodybuilder does is healthy.

Thunderwulf
11-26-2004, 10:43 AM
At least you die not looking like ****.

accuFLEX
11-26-2004, 11:51 AM
a "higher risk" could be like 0.01% higher

Geeper
11-26-2004, 01:56 PM
I take all that stuff wth a grain of salt. All "weight issue" articles are written from the perspective of trying to get fat, lazy people to start working out, to get off their asses and get moving, lifting ANYTHING!!!! I love seeing articles saying "if your BMI is x you won't live more than 10 years" even knowing most weightlifters are off the BMI scale.

My point is, we are VERY active, healthy people. For the most part most of us could tell you exactly how many calories we ate last Jan and how many grams of fat there was in our day. WE ARE THE EXCEPTION. The majority of the population needs scare tactics to get them exercising before we see all our relatives, friends etc dropping like flies before they hit 40.

shootermcgavin7
11-26-2004, 02:35 PM
I'm can't speak with any authority medically, but adding weight, period, whether it is muscle or fat, can lead to hypertension. Cholesterol and insulin levels I am not sure of, but I would imagine that a very quick weight increase could affect both of these areas.


I wouldn't disregard the study simply because you don't like what it says; as it seems a couple of posters are doing.