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The Real TO
12-21-2004, 03:46 PM
I've got some general questions for you guys. I'm trying to gain 12 pounds in 3 months. To give you my stats: I'm 5'8'' 168 lbs, and I'm 25. Now I know I should be able to gain weight by just eating, but I am going to do this the healthy way. No fast food, no alcohol. Just chicken, and pasta everyday, and some supplements.

I have a really busy schedule because of me being a personal trainer. I'm on the floor from 6 am-12 pm straight without any breaks everyday, and then from 3 pm-7:30 pm.

My question is what kind of foods/supplements can I consume when I have small 5 minute breaks? I'm not into supplements, but I understand that I am going to have to start eating/drinking them because I don't have the time to eat regular meals.

Another question is what time should I consume my calories everyday? I don't eat in the morning at all, and I know that has to change, and I know I am going to have to eat about 6-8 times a day to do this right. Is there a better time to consume more calories, or should I just really spread them out throughout the day?

If you guys could give me some input I would really appreciate it. Thanks.

Holto
12-21-2004, 05:16 PM
how much fat do you want to gain?

AdmiralDan
12-21-2004, 06:24 PM
if you only have 5 minutes, i would say a mrp shake or something of the sort. it will give you protein and calories and is pretty quick to make

SpecialK
12-21-2004, 06:30 PM
I don't think 12 lbs. of lbm in 3 months is a feasible goal, all naturallly anyway. However, as far as what to eat, I just started using the following shake recipie:

1 cup oats
2 scoops whey
1 tbsp olive oil
3 cups skim milk
1 chopped up banana

Just throw it all in a blender. It only takes a couple of minutes to prepare. Mix up 2 of those (or however many you need for the course of a normal day) the night before, put them in shaker cups or something, then store them at work (I'm assuming you have access to a refrigerator, if not just use a cooler with ice or something), and drink them whenever you get a chance. They are about 1200 cals each, but you can obviously adjust the ingrediants to make it or less than that.

As to your other question, I would just try to space your meals about 3-4 hours apart.

agentplaya1
12-21-2004, 09:24 PM
here's my question: if you're a personal trainer how do you not already know the answer to all those questions?

Adam
12-21-2004, 09:37 PM
In the past i used to work those hours too but i didnt get a 3hour break. You can gain alot of muscle but your going to have to start taking shakes and eating bars along with your food. Well, you don't 'have to but unless you can eat and cook a chicken breast in 5mins then your going to have to.

Holto
12-22-2004, 10:26 AM
here's my question: if you're a personal trainer how do you not already know the answer to all those questions?

PT's usually attend a weekend course or do something via correspondance

nutrition is not part of their training/education

ryuage
12-22-2004, 10:35 AM
PT's usually attend a weekend course or do something via correspondance

nutrition is not part of their training/education

its a part of any respectable one :) even a brief overview if any is given.

The Real TO
12-22-2004, 01:21 PM
Wow. I come in here to get a little advice about what to snack on during my breaks between workouts, and all of the sudden I'm an idiot because I asked a question about nutrition.

I went to Ball State, and I have a degree in Exercise Science, which is one of the top programs in the country for Exercise Science. I have been a personal trainer for 3 years now, and I think I might know a little bit more about strength training than some of you guys, but I do need a little help on the nutrition front, so that is why I am here. I don't know everything about the strength and nutrition game, and I never claimed that I did, but I just thought I would see what you guys thought.

Special K, and Adam thanks for the input. I will try that shake because that's sounds like it would be perfect for me.

Again, I thought this was a place for advice, and I've really liked coming to this site, but if people are going to act high and mighty, and think they are the only one's right, I guess it's not worth posting here. I've trained some pretty high profile people like Charles Barkley's wife, and the current 2004 Miss Indiana. I think I know a little bit more than you guys think I do.

Holto
12-22-2004, 02:14 PM
its a part of any respectable one :) even a brief overview if any is given.

this may be the difference in where we live

CanFit is thee standard in Canada and there is ZERO nutrition training

ryuage
12-22-2004, 02:15 PM
damn canadians :p

ryuage
12-22-2004, 02:19 PM
Wow. I come in here to get a little advice about what to snack on during my breaks between workouts, and all of the sudden I'm an idiot because I asked a question about nutrition.

I went to Ball State, and I have a degree in Exercise Science, which is one of the top programs in the country for Exercise Science. I have been a personal trainer for 3 years now, and I think I might know a little bit more about strength training than some of you guys, but I do need a little help on the nutrition front, so that is why I am here. I don't know everything about the strength and nutrition game, and I never claimed that I did, but I just thought I would see what you guys thought.

Special K, and Adam thanks for the input. I will try that shake because that's sounds like it would be perfect for me.

Again, I thought this was a place for advice, and I've really liked coming to this site, but if people are going to act high and mighty, and think they are the only one's right, I guess it's not worth posting here. I've trained some pretty high profile people like Charles Barkley's wife, and the current 2004 Miss Indiana. I think I know a little bit more than you guys think I do.


dont get your panties up in a bunch, plus noone cares who you trained heh, its not hard to train someone especially when diet and rest are more important. Simply carry along snacks or prepare meals in advance so that when you do get a chance you can grab a bite or eat while you are coaching... heck go tell them to walk on the treadmill for 10 minutes before they start lifting and you can go eat during that little time period.... but as others have stated... MRP's, protein bars, or small snacks are convenient.

The Real TO
12-22-2004, 02:38 PM
Thanks for the input Ryuage. Sorry I got a little off track, but I felt like I was getting raped from behind. A lot of personal trainer's are certified by mail in places, and they give us a bad name. Our facility has there own certification system that everyone has to pass, no matter what credentials they have if they want to train here.

Again, thanks for the ideas guys. Every piece of advice will help me.

Shao-LiN
12-22-2004, 05:37 PM
Gaining 12 pounds in 3 months is a reasonable goal. I aim for a pound a week. It just won't be all lean muscle, of course.

Rex
12-22-2004, 09:41 PM
Another question is what time should I consume my calories everyday? I don't eat in the morning at all, and I know that has to change, and I know I am going to have to eat about 6-8 times a day to do this right. Is there a better time to consume more calories, or should I just really spread them out throughout the day?

12 pounds in three months is definitely doable, but it's not all going to be muscle.

You need to eat in the morning, as soon as you wake up. Getting food into your body will help stop overnight catabolism. Breakfast is one of the most important meals of the day for that reason.

As you know, you'll need to eat 6 - 8 times a day. Eat something every 3 - 4 hours. I personally tend to concentrate my meals with high calorie content (1000 +) post workout. That's just my personal preference and it's not needed. You'll find there to be allot of conflicting information about what to eat and when to eat it. I personally think allot of that information just bogs people down. The secret is balls to the wall hard work. And eat allot of cals. And sleep every now and again.

You'll hear people talking about pre workout shakes, post workout shakes, and there is even science to back these things up. I really think that the bottom line for gaining quality mass is:

1. Eat more cals than required. You need to be in a calorie surpluss.
2. Spread the cals out over 6 meals.
3. Eat 1 gram of protein for every pound of body fat
4. Drink allot of water.

Follow the above, train hard and you won't go wrong.

I'd also strive to have roughly a 40/40/20 micronutrient breakdown.
Concentrate high GI carbs for around training, but I wouldn't worry about it all that much.
Limit saturated fat intake as much as possible. Completely avoid trans fat.
Monitor sodium intake if eating lots of canned goods.

agentplaya1
12-23-2004, 01:33 AM
Thanks for the input Ryuage. Sorry I got a little off track, but I felt like I was getting raped from behind. A lot of personal trainer's are certified by mail in places, and they give us a bad name. Our facility has there own certification system that everyone has to pass, no matter what credentials they have if they want to train here.

Again, thanks for the ideas guys. Every piece of advice will help me.

sorry dude, didn't mean to rape you from behind, I was just wondering how a personal trainer can not know about nutrition. Fitness, whether gaining or losing weight, is about 90% diet/nutrition so I was just wondering how someone whose job it is to get someone into shape can not know about nutrition.
I'm not making a personal attack on you, it's just that I always hear from people who train at gyms that have personal trainers saying that these trainers are either out of shape or don't know what the hell they're doing, or both! It just gives the whole profession a bad rap because it makes it seem like anyone can become a personal trainer without knowing anything. I've been thinkin about becoming a PT as a part time gig for extra cash so this troubles me, and your post just kind of underscored this belief that anyone can become a PT without knowing much, esp. since your questions seemed to be Nutrition Basics 101. Like I said I'm not attacking you personally, so don't get your panties in a bunch. Anywho, welcome to WBB, I hope you learn a lot from this board. :study:

fen2zla
12-23-2004, 03:55 AM
3. Eat 1 gram of protein for every pound of body fat

So if you have 10% body fat and you are 200lbs, you should eat ~20 grams of protein per day? ;)

Just joking dude, I think we all know what you mean.

The Real TO
12-23-2004, 07:07 AM
Thanks Rex. I'm starting after the 1st of the year, and I'll let you know how things go.

Happy Holidays.

orbital
12-25-2004, 01:48 AM
very strange.