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jazer80
01-07-2005, 04:29 PM
does the GI of oats change if i grind them up in a shake?

Optimum08
01-07-2005, 05:47 PM
hmm i wouldn't think so...as long as you aren't adding anything in while grinding...i doubt the glycemic index of the oats would change as it would just be a change in state not anything else...

TheGimp
01-07-2005, 05:47 PM
The rate of digestion will be affected by the surface area, so I would suspect yes.

AdmiralDan
01-07-2005, 06:22 PM
but you normally chew them, increasing their surface area. i don't think that the glycemic index will change at all

Cynical_Simian
01-07-2005, 07:36 PM
I'd say it depends on how much you grind them up. If, for example, you make oat flour by grinding up a bunch of old-fashioned oats as part of a protein bar recipe or something, you're probably changing the GI a decent amount. In that case, they're becoming more finely ground than instant/quick oats, which definitely have higher GIs than regular oats. But if you're just blending them into the shake, the difference is likely negligible or non-existent.

smalls
01-08-2005, 01:15 AM
As stated, the difference is negligible. Dont worry about it bro.

jazer80
01-08-2005, 01:36 PM
no i mean i really grind them up in a shake, to the point where they won't even settle out while i'm drinking it.

if grinding things up doesn't change it, then apple juice and apples would have the same GI right? (don't have any charts handy, are they the same GI?)

TTT
01-08-2005, 02:10 PM
Don't forget though that a lot of juices are from concentrate, so you need to compare 'fresh' apple juice that hasn't been concentrated.

jazer80
01-08-2005, 03:40 PM
so concentrating affects GI? either way, for argument's sake, would fresh apple juice have same GI as apples?

TheGimp
01-08-2005, 04:19 PM
No, because it won't have the fiber of the apple.

If you're grinding the oats that finely then I'm even more convinced the GI will be altered. Whether it's significant or not is another matter.

smalls
01-08-2005, 04:49 PM
Even if the GI was changed would you stop making your shakes that way? The fiber is still there and from a body composition perspective it will not make a difference.

body
01-09-2005, 09:50 AM
if you mash them to a really really fine pulp it will increase the GI as stated above as they will be easier to digest. It will not effect GI that much.

have you managed to mash oats enough into a shake yet keep it tastey?

i just use banana.

jazer80
01-09-2005, 06:47 PM
sometimes they taste okay, sometimes not. i usually remember to get something tasty in there, or some sugar. also i add ice so the texture makes it more palatable. i also put bananas in, and flax seeds, soy protein and/or whey, milk, peanut butter, basically anything i can find. sometimes coffee. more often than not random stuff gets in there and the flavors clash badly, but as long as it's a little sweet and cold you get used to it

jazer80
01-09-2005, 06:52 PM
Even if the GI was changed would you stop making your shakes that way?
i would actually, if i significantly changed the GI composition. i'm following 'macrobolic nutrition' principles (from a book by some supplement company), but basically i'm not eating anything w/ high GI anymore, except around workouts, but i've cut down the amount of high GI stuff around workouts as well. it's just not good to have high GI stuff, aside from storing fat it's not good for your skin and other stuff. it's just not healthy, so i'm trying to stay away from it, plus i started my bulk off a little while back and put on a little fat right away in the beginning because i was making a good portion of my daily calories from weightgainers w/ maltodext, but i don't want to have to cut when i get to my target weight, so i'm just going w/ low GI whole foods in big quantities every two - three hours.


The fiber is still there and from a body composition perspective it will not make a difference.
how would it not make a difference if you go from eating something w/ low GI to moderate or high?

smalls
01-10-2005, 01:19 AM
i would actually, if i significantly changed the GI composition. i'm following 'macrobolic nutrition' principles (from a book by some supplement company), but basically i'm not eating anything w/ high GI anymore, except around workouts, but i've cut down the amount of high GI stuff around workouts as well. it's just not good to have high GI stuff, aside from storing fat it's not good for your skin and other stuff. it's just not healthy, so i'm trying to stay away from it, plus i started my bulk off a little while back and put on a little fat right away in the beginning because i was making a good portion of my daily calories from weightgainers w/ maltodext, but i don't want to have to cut when i get to my target weight, so i'm just going w/ low GI whole foods in big quantities every two - three hours.


how would it not make a difference if you go from eating something w/ low GI to moderate or high?

Because GI isnt going to go from very low to very high just from blending it, it will change but not drastically. If you want to be 5% then slight GI changes may matter. But putting on muscle without fat isnt going to change that dramatically from Gi changes, at least not for me.