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View Full Version : Power racks (half versus full)



pytron
01-30-2005, 09:52 PM
I have some questions about half racks versus full racks. Mainly, is there much advantage to getting a full rack versus a half rack? The half racks that I've seen are cheaper and take up less space. The only downside seems to be that the don't have a pull-up bar or dip option.

I'd like to get a power rack but I'm not sure if I should get a full or a half rack. By half rack I mean something like this:

http://www.wannabebigforums.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=14969&stc=1

Basically something that has the weight catches at the top and some sort of safety spotters below (not pictured in the above picture).

Any opinions? Anyone upgrade from a half rack to a full rack and want to talk about it? Anyone move the other direction?

Thanks in advance,
-Pytron

Adam
01-30-2005, 11:11 PM
Main advantage that I can think of:
If you fall back in a fullcage, you hear "bang"
if you fall back in a half-rack you fall back.

ericg
01-31-2005, 10:56 AM
I would rather get a "full rack". For one they seem to be safer in my eyes; two, I would bet you could do a lot more in a full rack.

bill
01-31-2005, 10:58 AM
Well the thing your showing looks like a smith machine?

ericg
01-31-2005, 11:37 AM
I agree with Bill - didnt look at the pic till now...

Power rack, full rack, or some even call it a cage looks like this...

http://www.newyorkbarbells.com/92563n.gif

"Half rack" or as most call it, a squat rack, looks like this...

http://www.newyorkbarbells.com/pro93155w.jpg

pytron
01-31-2005, 11:52 AM
Thanks, much better pictures. Looking back my example does look like a smith machine. Yikes.

bill
01-31-2005, 01:42 PM
We have both at the gym, where I lift. I prefer the cage it feels safer and would give you a lot of options for bench, shoulders, deads. More versatile, but depends on what else you need and can spend.

Brad Cardoza
01-31-2005, 02:31 PM
I know lots of friends and clients that have gone with this one and have been very happy with the product. definitely go full rack, you'll end up being able to add a lot of different variations to your routine vs. the half rack.

pytron
02-10-2005, 11:20 AM
Because of your advice I skipped the half/squat rack and decided to hold out for a full rack.

I ended up getting a smokin' deal on a full rack and bench. It will end up costing me $50 and about 10 hours in labor.

Thanks for all your perspectives and I'm very glad I waited!

-Pytron

ericg
02-10-2005, 12:21 PM
Good to hear. I was going to suggest to build one. I had one in my basesment. I even had some pulleyes to do pushdowns, pulldowns, and seated rows. Enjoy.

garagedoor79
02-15-2005, 12:13 PM
Because of your advice I skipped the half/squat rack and decided to hold out for a full rack.

I ended up getting a smokin' deal on a full rack and bench. It will end up costing me $50 and about 10 hours in labor.

Thanks for all your perspectives and I'm very glad I waited!

-Pytron

Built from scratch? That might be what I'm looking for. Have any plans or links to plans? I'm getting frustrated at the high costs and lack of choices here in my area.

Cheers!

pytron
02-15-2005, 12:44 PM
Heh. The smokin' deal involved 10 hours of labor, but it wasn't building it myself.

I bought a rack, bench, and a bunch of weights as a package deal. I didn't need all the weights so the 10 hours of labor is moving the weights and reselling them. I still haven't sold them all so I'm not certain how much the rack/bench will end up costing me. I bought the whole set (rack, bench, 300 lbs dumbells, 2x 300 lbs Olympic weight set, Olympic weight tree, floor mat) for $400.

I kept 1/4 (rack, bench, tree, floor mat), sold 1/4 (one weight set) and my old bench for $150, have a buyer for the dumbbells at $100, and another buyer for the rest of the weights at $100. So it should cost me $50 ($400 - 150 - 100 - 100) and my old bench.

Sorry for any confusion. I had looked at building my own in the past but it was too good of deal to pass up.

If you are looking for inspiration for building your own, I thought the homemade outdoor gym at this site was pretty cool: http://tsampa.org/training/toffesgym/

ElPietro
02-15-2005, 12:50 PM
The versatility of a full rack and good bench can't be beat. Just think what you use the most in the gym, or what you could do safely in that rack, and you'll realize that you'd have to spend like $10k in machines to be able to duplicate it's functionality.

Make sure you are comfortable on the bench before you take it, or shop around for another one. Benches can come in different heights, and widths. Depending on your weight and what you lift, you might want one with wide guage steel feet that are splayed on either end for stability. Also, an incline function would be good if you can get it.

Last thing you might want to think of, is rubberized flooring. The inch thick stuff usually comes in 4'x6' sheets, weighs A LOT, and probably runs you around $50-60 each. You'll probably need two. People will say, "check farm supply shops" but it doesn't matter, it's pretty much the same price from what I've seen. Most stores are selling this stuff at cost already.

ElPietro
02-15-2005, 12:50 PM
Ok, nevermind, you posted that while I was keying mine in. :)