PDA

View Full Version : Flax Oil or Seeds?



darius19
02-09-2005, 05:58 PM
I have never actualy had this stuff, but I recently learned about all the benefits and I kick myself for not trying it sooner.
What I want to ask, however, is whether I should buy the seeds or the oil itself? I was thinking the seeds would be better to mix with foods...but which one is better?

getfit
02-09-2005, 06:00 PM
i use flax seeds put it usually in my oats and flax oil in my shakes

galileo
02-09-2005, 06:01 PM
If you have the choice, seeds are likely a little better, but I would also consider using a fish oil instead.

Eddan
02-10-2005, 02:47 AM
The seeds have to be crushed to get to the oil. If not they just pass though the intestines. Should be good as "fiber" though.

darius19
02-10-2005, 05:12 AM
Oh...are you positive they will just pass thru the intestines?

TheGimp
02-10-2005, 05:54 AM
Yes, flax seeds have a tough outer shell that renders them indigestible. They must be ground if you want the benefit of the EFAs.

Big_Gunz
02-10-2005, 06:03 AM
Theoretically from a scientific and physiological nutritional standpoint it is theoretically of greater benefit to consume flax in it's lipid state as found in refined versions of flaxseed oil such as caplets or pharmaceutical liquids. In actuality the pharmaceutical variety, although generally associated with vitamins and or supplements can in fact be used for culinary purposes.

TheGimp
02-10-2005, 06:11 AM
In actuality the pharmaceutical variety, although generally associated with vitamins and or supplements can in fact be used for culinary purposes.

Certainly not if you're going to heat it. Flax oil is very sensitive to heat (and light and air and should be stored in the fridge).

Big_Gunz
02-10-2005, 06:18 AM
Pardon me but flax has been used in cooking for centuries. Ancient records reveal that the human race has consumed flaxseed since the beginning of civilization. Before 5,000 BC, Egyptians cooked with flax seeds and flax seed oil. Much later in history, Hippocrates wrote about cooking with flax seed oil. In 8th century France, King Charlemagne considered flax so important for the health of his subjects that he passed laws and regulations requiring its consumption and it's use as a base for cooking as an additive to butter or traditional cooking oils.

TheGimp
02-10-2005, 06:30 AM
So you disagree with:

http://www.askdrsears.com/html/4/T041700.asp

Don't use flax oil for cooking. Oils high in essential fatty acids are not good for cooking. In fact, heat can turn these healthy fats into harmful ones. Add flax oil to foods after cooking and just before serving.

http://www.organicfood.co.uk/vms/flaxseedoil.html

Can I cook with flax seed oil?

No, Flax Seed Oil in liquid form is very sensitive and is degraded by light, heat and air. Manufacturers often recommend that the Flax Seed Oil be kept inside its original box, inside the fridge.

http://www.sentienttimes.com/02/aug_sept/flaxT.html

While all vegetable oils become rancid when exposed to high heat, light and oxygen, omega-3 fatty acids are especially vulnerable because they’re molecularly the least stable.

http://nutrition.about.com/od/healthyshopping/tp/omega3oils.htm

Flax oil is a great source of omega 3 oil and can be used cold on salads, vegetables, or in place of butter, but don't cook with flax oil.

http://forum.lowcarber.org/archive/index.php/t-198058.html

Don't cook with flax oil. It is easily damaged.

http://www.vegfamily.com/vegan-children/flax.htm

Flax oil should not be exposed to direct heat, as in frying or sautéing, as this will damage the oil.

http://www.silanutrition.com/organicflax.html

Never heat your organic flax oil! Heating flax oil destroys its delicate essential fatty acid content

http://www.cancer.med.umich.edu/news/pro00fa10.htm

You can use flax oil to make salad dressings, such as vinaigrette or vinegar & oil. DO NOT cook with flax oil because it cannot take the heat of cooking. Heat will make the oil rancid.

http://www.healingdaily.com/detoxification-diet/flaxseed.htm

You can also use it instead of olive oil in a salad dressing. Don't cook with it, however, as this will deplete the oil's nutrient content.

http://www.recipenet.org/health/articles/flax.htm

Never use flax products in high temperature cooking. Flax oil should only be added to hot foods after cooking

A sample of what I find when searching for "cook flax oil" on google.

Holto
02-10-2005, 09:55 AM
Pardon me but flax has been used in cooking for centuries. Ancient records reveal that the human race has consumed flaxseed since the beginning of civilization. Before 5,000 BC, Egyptians cooked with flax seeds and flax seed oil. Much later in history, Hippocrates wrote about cooking with flax seed oil. In 8th century France, King Charlemagne considered flax so important for the health of his subjects that he passed laws and regulations requiring its consumption and it's use as a base for cooking as an additive to butter or traditional cooking oils.

this all happened pre-microscope also...

waynis
02-10-2005, 10:32 AM
use the oil. Easier digested

TheGimp
02-10-2005, 11:26 AM
this all happened pre-microscope also...

Exactly. Our knowledge of nutrition and chemistry has matured somewhat in the intervening centuries since Charlemagne.

malkore
02-10-2005, 02:02 PM
Yeah, flax oil has a very low smoking point...you can't even really sautee with it. However you could make a vinegrette or marinade with it. I prefer just to take it straight, or mix some in with a whey shake to slow down the digestion.
I'd also suggest getting a bottle of oil vs. caplets. Caplets are only 1 gram, and a serving is approx. 14 grams...who wants to take 14 caplets in one sitting?