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View Full Version : GRADUAL or IMMEDIATE carb reduction?



TheBigNasty
02-22-2005, 07:35 AM
I've done a search on this and I cant seem to see any discussions on it, if this has been discussed at length before, I apologise. :moon:

On here, people advocating PSMF seem to suggest that from day 1 you eat NO or practically NO carbs, and sustain this for upto 12 weeks with occaisonal refeeds...

SOUNDS GOOD... but... :scratch:

...this conflicts with diet advice from the Pros who suggest gradually decreasing your carbohydrate intake, less carbs each couple of weeks for upto 2 months before getting to the NO/practically NO carb state.

Ive just started a cut by reducing my carbs by 50% and starting cardio (Im still eating about 6 - 8 slices of multigrain, low GI bread per day with my protein and having a protein and carb drink after working out) , however you guys advocating PSMF would go to almost 0% straight away.

Any one wanna help out here, not sure which advice is best? Why do the pros go gradual? :scratch:

Vido
02-22-2005, 10:43 AM
There's basically 2 ways of dieting: hardcore (PSMF, UD2) and regular (start at 500 cals below maintenance and gradually drop calories and increase cardio). People around here are starting to recommend the more hardcore types of diets because the results come quicker. No one wants to cut 2-3 months just to lose 10 lbs.

I can't really comment on what the pros do because I don't know...and I doubt you do either. If you read that in a magazine, it's not necessarily true. However, there's a plethora of reasons that a pro might use a more moderate diet, including:

a) It's what they've done in the past. If it ain't broke don't fix it. These hardcore diets are quite new and if the other diets have already worked for the pros before, why would they switch to something uncertain now?

b) You should never compare to the pros in the first place. These guys have TREMENDOUS work ethic and genetics, as well as run copious amounts of drugs.

c) Although PSMF is the ultimate FAT-burning diet, it's not necessarily totally muscle and strength-sparing.

d) Believe it or not, pros aren't necessarily omniscient. I bet there's people on this board that know a lot more than some pros do. In other words (and combined with point b), just because a pro is doing something it doesn't make it right.

e) I'm sure I could go on forever, but you get the point.

CrazyK
02-22-2005, 12:31 PM
From what I've seen personally, a lot of Pro's go low carbs(~180-200g) for 6 days a week, then go high carbs(~500g) for one day a week, until they reach their desired goal. The other macronutrients are dependent on bodyweight.

FenianIrish
02-22-2005, 01:01 PM
I stopped eating carbs completely (went from 100-200g / day to less than 10g /day), and people started noticing results in a little over a week. Dropped 18% of my starting bodyweight in 4 months (182 to 150 pounds).

betastas
02-22-2005, 04:30 PM
From my experience with extreme low carbs, the first week loss is a slight bit of fat and a lot of water. Carbs retain water. As you lose the carbs from the system, you lose the water too. Both have worked for me, but I find it more manageable to do the moderation of carbs diet while in school. I have a lot of things to think and worry about, and theres no need for extreme carb counting to be one of them.

Vido
02-22-2005, 04:43 PM
From my experience with extreme low carbs, the first week loss is a slight bit of fat and a lot of water. Carbs retain water. As you lose the carbs from the system, you lose the water too. Both have worked for me, but I find it more manageable to do the moderation of carbs diet while in school. I have a lot of things to think and worry about, and theres no need for extreme carb counting to be one of them.

I agree with the point about school for sure.

As for losing water on a low carb diet, yes that's true. However, the point of a PSMF or UD2-style diet is to create the largest caloric deficit possible, while retaining as much muscle as you can. Protein is the macronutrient that is going to achieve this, with a distant second place being awarded to fat. Carbs are the least important of the 3 macronutrients and therefore, if you want to drastically reduce cals it only makes sense to go low (no) carb.

lilmase1153
02-22-2005, 04:56 PM
There's basically 2 ways of dieting: hardcore (PSMF, UD2) and regular (start at 500 cals below maintenance and gradually drop calories and increase cardio). People around here are starting to recommend the more hardcore types of diets because the results come quicker. No one wants to cut 2-3 months just to lose 10 lbs.

I can't really comment on what the pros do because I don't know...and I doubt you do either. If you read that in a magazine, it's not necessarily true. However, there's a plethora of reasons that a pro might use a more moderate diet, including:

a) It's what they've done in the past. If it ain't broke don't fix it. These hardcore diets are quite new and if the other diets have already worked for the pros before, why would they switch to something uncertain now?

b) You should never compare to the pros in the first place. These guys have TREMENDOUS work ethic and genetics, as well as run copious amounts of drugs.

c) Although PSMF is the ultimate FAT-burning diet, it's not necessarily totally muscle and strength-sparing.

d) Believe it or not, pros aren't necessarily omniscient. I bet there's people on this board that know a lot more than some pros do. In other words (and combined with point b), just because a pro is doing something it doesn't make it right.

e) I'm sure I could go on forever, but you get the point.
couldnt have said it better myself.. and yes psmf is the ultimate IMO fat burner but it has absolutely killed my strength :-( so another option with psmf is to add some creatine (one without carbs) to help keep your muscles feeling full and not flat all the time,,

TheBigNasty
02-25-2005, 08:07 AM
Ok cheers guys, thanks for the advice

AKraut
02-25-2005, 08:28 AM
From personal experience I have an all or nothing mentality which leads to a lot of diet failures. I would do what you think you are capable of rather than set extreme goals. I've tried a CKD on 3 seperate occassions now and haven't lasted more than 2 weeks each time. Once I break the diet even slightly I eat bad for almost a straight week. I would pick whichever diet meets your goals while also not increasing your overall stress level.