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View Full Version : Overweight, Cardio VS Weights



ironworker
03-07-2005, 07:27 AM
I just started working out (just cardio) on Friday, this morning was the first time I actually implemented my plan which was: to start some sort of routine before work everyday so that I don't become a fat ass with a heart condition.
I am 38 yrs old, 6'2 238 lbs which wouldn't be a bad weight if I was ripped but ripped is definitely not what I am :mad: , so basically I am about 25lbs over weight.
I did 25 minutes on an elliptical this morning which was everything my body could muster.
I guess my question is do you think itís better to try to lose my body fat then attempt to work my muscles? Or both at the same time.
Any help and or suggestions would help.

Yes I am on a low carb diet.

Thanks Rich

Holto
03-07-2005, 07:36 AM
lifting weights will have more impact in the first 6 months of training

diet is everything

it's almost impossible to lose weight by cardio alone

ryuage
03-07-2005, 08:38 AM
i would disagree i know tons of people who can lose weight without lifting.... although im not advocating it.

AdmiralDan
03-07-2005, 08:45 AM
both would be best. start a good all around routine like wbb1. the combination of weights and cardio will help you greatly. holto said, diet is key

TheGimp
03-07-2005, 10:35 AM
Do both. The metabolic boost from weight lifting aids in burning a significant number of calories.

gino
03-07-2005, 11:13 AM
Yeah, both.

Something like 3 days weights followed by breif cardio, 3 days extended cardio only, and 1 day rest per week would be good for you.

Is working out consistantly a way of life you're planning to stick with?

EJFan
03-07-2005, 11:29 AM
maybe someone can clarify if this is actually prudent or not, but this is what i did with a lot of success...

when i first set out to lose weight, i lifted RELATIVELY light weights with a high rep quantity (15 or more as opposed to 6-8) and VERY short breaks between sets. it's not the best thing for adding mass efficiently, but for me, it gave me some good muscle development, solid form and a fair cardio workout... all in preparation to start a proper lifting routine.

robinhood
03-07-2005, 12:01 PM
maybe someone can clarify if this is actually prudent or not, but this is what i did with a lot of success...

when i first set out to lose weight, i lifted RELATIVELY light weights with a high rep quantity (15 or more as opposed to 6-8) and VERY short breaks between sets. it's not the best thing for adding mass efficiently, but for me, it gave me some good muscle development, solid form and a fair cardio workout... all in preparation to start a proper lifting routine.

This similar plan along with watching the quality of food in my diet (I started with just watching the nutritional quality of the food vs. actually watching the quantity) and it has worked really well for me. I'm 6'2" and 215 now and I started in the 230 range as well.

Built
03-07-2005, 12:43 PM
Ironworker, you are starting from the same position I was in about three and a half years ago.

You have gotten great advise here - cardio burns a little fat while you're doing it, but you don't get a metabolic boost from it like you do with the lifting.

I followed a plan that was virtually identical to what Gino suggested while on a low-carb diet, and... it worked. :) (Extended cardio for me was bike rides or jogging for an hour on 3 non-lifting days. I can't jog anymore, so I now stick to fast walking or the bike rides). I went from 170 to 140-something, and other than the usual ebb and flow of small bulks and cuts, I stay here.

A few things I noticed along the way:
*I can now get away (and actually need) more carbs than when I was fatter - look into CKD, TKD, and various other carb-cycling strategies as you plateau (and you will, it happens to all of us. You will have to vary your strategy as you go)
*I now seem to get a lot more metabolic advantage from the lifting than I do from cardio, which I've been able to virtually ditch other than recreational bike rides and a half hour walk a few times a week.

Best of luck.

AllUp
03-07-2005, 01:38 PM
Do both. The metabolic boost from weight lifting aids in burning a significant number of calories.
Oi, try weights with post workout cardio. :thumbup:

Geeper
03-07-2005, 01:53 PM
In the last year I've lost 80 pounds.

Here's what I've learnt

Diet is everything!!!! Start using fitday.com and track EVERYTHING you put in your mouth, food, drinks ect. (don't forget the liquids) and find the thread on here of what a bodybuilder eats, print it and live it.

Cardio is the best quick weight loss thing. A lot of people will disagree with that and you'll read a lot about the new movement of lifting weights to lose weight, but even the best bodybuilders in the world do tons of cardio when they are trying to lose weight for a show. Muscle will burn more calories in the long run, so don't forget to lift as well.

Lift HEAVY. Most overweight people have a lot more muscle than they know, and when you lose weight you will lose some muscle. (I forget the figure but it's something like for every pound lost 60% is fat, 40% is muscle) So lift heavy with very low reps, this will hopefully help maintain the muscle that you have under any fat. Just think, you can probably already leg press your weight at a minimum (238 pounds) don'y loose that ability, lift HEAVY

And you won't find many people here, or bodybuilders in gerenal that are advocates of low carb, BALANCE is the key. (Well, balance and a gram of protein per pound of bodyweight to feed those muscles) It's far from about low carb, we need carbs for the energy to get us through our workouts. Almost everyone here eats TONS of oatmeal. It's the types of carbs and their timing through the day that is important.

Good luck and keep us updated!!!

ironworker
03-07-2005, 02:25 PM
Is working out consistently a way of life you're planning to stick with? I guess I fall under the spell that most Americans do with a busy work schedule and home which needs a man along with a family who needs a dad, I can't imagine fitting another full time routine in my life but what choice do I have?
I am so tired of being over weight, itís funny because when I was a kid I was skin and bones then after about 22 I started gaining weight, I have been heavy set since then.

I have to be honest and say that I like results when I do something, and if I am not seeing results then I tend to give up rather quickly.
I am on the low carb diet and it sucks, I havenít eaten bread (any kind) and there is only so much salad a man can eat.

I have made a promise to myself to go to the gym for cardio or if I learn that I should do weights at the same time for a month solid, I will re evaluate my condition after 4 weeks and if the results are good and it wasnít the most painful thing I have done in my life then I will most likely continue.

I sure wish I had a friend to go to the gym with everyday, it would make it easier and I would have someone to help me figure out what the hell I am doing.

Thank you everyone for your responses.

Rich.

dw06wu
03-07-2005, 02:49 PM
I guess I fall under the spell that most Americans do with a busy work schedule and home which needs a man along with a family who needs a dad, I can't imagine fitting another full time routine in my life but what choice do I have?
I am so tired of being over weight, itís funny because when I was a kid I was skin and bones then after about 22 I started gaining weight, I have been heavy set since then.

I have to be honest and say that I like results when I do something, and if I am not seeing results then I tend to give up rather quickly.
I am on the low carb diet and it sucks, I havenít eaten bread (any kind) and there is only so much salad a man can eat.

I have made a promise to myself to go to the gym for cardio or if I learn that I should do weights at the same time for a month solid, I will re evaluate my condition after 4 weeks and if the results are good and it wasnít the most painful thing I have done in my life then I will most likely continue.

I sure wish I had a friend to go to the gym with everyday, it would make it easier and I would have someone to help me figure out what the hell I am doing.

Thank you everyone for your responses.

Rich.

The main thing is sticking with it. If you keep your diet and exercise routine strict, ie not skipping, I can guarantee you impressive results in 1 month. Once you change your diet and exercise lifestyle (and stick with it permanently), all it becomes is a matter of time before you are in peak physical condition.

Built
03-07-2005, 04:01 PM
In the last year I've lost 80 pounds.

Here's what I've learnt

Diet is everything!!!! Start using fitday.com and track EVERYTHING you put in your mouth, food, drinks ect. (don't forget the liquids) and find the thread on here of what a bodybuilder eats, print it and live it.

Cardio is the best quick weight loss thing. A lot of people will disagree with that and you'll read a lot about the new movement of lifting weights to lose weight, but even the best bodybuilders in the world do tons of cardio when they are trying to lose weight for a show. Muscle will burn more calories in the long run, so don't forget to lift as well.
Really? My niece competes, and she doesn't do very much cardio to cut up. I gained 30 lbs in three years jogging 10k 3x a week on the wrong diet, but lifting and the right diet dropped that 30 lbs and kept it off.

I know lots of competitive bodybuilders. They all do SOME cardio, but tons? Too catabolic to muscle tissue. I don't know any who would risk that. Tons of cardio tends to make you soft. Case in point: runners. Look at their bodies.



Lift HEAVY. Most overweight people have a lot more muscle than they know, and when you lose weight you will lose some muscle. (I forget the figure but it's something like for every pound lost 60% is fat, 40% is muscle) So lift heavy with very low reps, this will hopefully help maintain the muscle that you have under any fat. Just think, you can probably already leg press your weight at a minimum (238 pounds) don'y loose that ability, lift HEAVY

And you won't find many people here, or bodybuilders in gerenal that are advocates of low carb, BALANCE is the key.
Balance varies from person to person. If what you're doing works, it's balanced, FOR YOU. If it isn't working, I don't care what genius came up with your diet - it isn't balanced for you.



(Well, balance and a gram of protein per pound of bodyweight to feed those muscles)

It's far from about low carb, we need carbs for the energy to get us through our workouts. Almost everyone here eats TONS of oatmeal.
I eat SOME oatmeal, but not tons - on lifting days, usually a cup (measured raw). And my protein is considerably higher than a gram per pound bodyweight - usually closer to 1.5g, or even higher.

This works for me. The miserable part is fiddling with the ratios to find what works for you.



It's the types of carbs and their timing through the day that is important.

Good luck and keep us updated!!!


I completely agree with you on the timing and combining through the day. This is key.

Geeper
03-07-2005, 04:12 PM
Really? My niece competes, and she doesn't do very much cardio to cut up. I gained 30 lbs in three years jogging 10k 3x a week on the wrong diet, but lifting and the right diet dropped that 30 lbs and kept it off.

I know lots of competitive bodybuilders. They all do SOME cardio, but tons? Too catabolic to muscle tissue. I don't know any who would risk that. Tons of cardio tends to make you soft. Case in point: runners. Look at their bodies.


I know lots of competitive BB too and let me tell you the guys I know start hogging the cardio equipment big time as the comps come closer. In the week before comp, 45 minutes a day seems pretty standard, and yes they loose some strenght, but that's not what BB is about (powerlifting is), it's about how they look on stage.
Your niece sounds blessed with a fast metabolism, cause the women I know who compete are twice as bad as the men in cutting and doing excessive cardio.
Then there's the BIG names who do drugs we can't even talk about and tons of cardio to blast off their bulk pre-contest... the pre-contest bible is a REALLY intesting book with interviews with all the top pros and details their diets, workouts, cardio ect from 12 weeks out to contest day. The only thing it doesn't have is their drug regime.

Built
03-07-2005, 04:34 PM
Ah, 45 mins a day. Cool. Yes, I think this is pretty normal. When you said tons, I had visions of muscle-heads running marathons. :rolleyes:

I do know master's competitors (male) who bulk AND cut on fairly low carbs (with refeeds, of course) and very little cardio. I think it depends on a lot of factors. Seems to vary quite a bit from person to person.

I'll say one thing though - cardio won't make up for a ****ty diet. Neither will lifting.

:cool: