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View Full Version : When doing HIIT, do you want to be sprinting the hardest you can...



fixationdarknes
03-13-2005, 11:51 AM
...when doing the sprint intervals?

tholian8
03-13-2005, 12:03 PM
Yes.

PowerManDL
03-13-2005, 12:12 PM
I wouldn't advise it if you're doing repeated sessions per week.

tholian8
03-13-2005, 12:19 PM
OMG, I wasn't thinking of repeated sessions per week. I tried that once, last year, and it damn near killed me.

fixationdarknes
03-13-2005, 12:32 PM
I wouldn't advise it if you're doing repeated sessions per week.

If I plan on doing it 2x a week, I shouldn't go my hardest? If not, about what % of my maximum do you think I should try for?

PowerManDL
03-13-2005, 12:35 PM
75-80%

All out sprinting is pretty taxing on the body.

fixationdarknes
03-13-2005, 12:37 PM
75-80%

All out sprinting is pretty taxing on the body.

Alright, thanks.

KingJustin
03-13-2005, 01:54 PM
75-80%

All out sprinting is pretty taxing on the body.

Does this hold true to the same effect on well trained runners?

Vido
03-13-2005, 02:06 PM
75-80%

Is that even "HIIT" then? I thought you had to be at least at 85% of your MRH.

Personally, I think the answer is "yes"...go all out every sprint interval.

ryuage
03-13-2005, 03:15 PM
Does this hold true to the same effect on well trained runners?

if you were a well trained runner all it would mean is that it would take longer/faster speeds to get you to that threshold so what would the difference be?

ryuage
03-13-2005, 03:16 PM
Is that even "HIIT" then? I thought you had to be at least at 85% of your MRH.

Personally, I think the answer is "yes"...go all out every sprint interval.


I dont think one would last very long going "all out" and HIIT doesnt stand for balls to the wall run till you die training. Im pretty sure you could get away with interval in the 80% range with a recovery period, as I believe that is what they used for the tabata protocol.

Vido
03-13-2005, 04:26 PM
I dont think one would last very long going "all out" and HIIT doesnt stand for balls to the wall run till you die training. Im pretty sure you could get away with interval in the 80% range with a recovery period, as I believe that is what they used for the tabata protocol.

The thing is, "all-out" is relative. It's as fast as you can go AT THAT SPECIFIC TIME. Just like you wouldn't be able to run as fast if you just ate a large pizza, you won't be able to run as fast after a few sprints, but you're still giving 100%.

ryuage
03-13-2005, 04:32 PM
i just dont think you have to perform the interval at 100 percent or damn near it to achieve the goals/benefits associated with hiit.

Vido
03-13-2005, 04:37 PM
i just dont think you have to perform the interval at 100 percent or damn near it to achieve the goals/benefits associated with hiit.

I don't think you necessarily do either. I just don't think giving it your all has any downside, and can only benefit you.

In addition, if you don't have a heart rate monitor how do you know you're going at 80%? At least if you push it you might not end up going 100%, but you know you'll be going hard enough to get the desired results.

fixationdarknes
03-13-2005, 05:52 PM
Well, another thing to keep in mind is that I'm a newbie to HIIT, so would that change anything?

Also, let's say I ran at 100% of my maximum ability during every sprint interval. Pretty soon, my 100% would be a lot slower. Would that be okay? I mean, if I go at 100% every sprint, toward the middle/end of my HIIT session, my 100% isn't going to be the same 100% that it was at the beginning of the session.

Also, since I'm a newbie, is it good to do sprint/walk?..whereas the pros maybe do sprint/jog or sprint/run?

Vido
03-13-2005, 05:58 PM
Well, another thing to keep in mind is that I'm a newbie to HIIT, so would that change anything?

It won't change anything regarding the effectiveness of the HIIT...if anything your body will probably respond more favourably because it's a new stimulus. The only thing it will change is the length of the sprint/rest intervals. If you're just starting out you'll probably have to sprint for less time and/or rest longer.


Also, let's say I ran at 100% of my maximum ability during every sprint interval. Pretty soon, my 100% would be a lot slower. Would that be okay? I mean, if I go at 100% every sprint, toward the middle/end of my HIIT session, my 100% isn't going to be the same 100% that it was at the beginning of the session.

That's exactly what I said above. I don't see how this would be detrimental.


Also, since I'm a newbie, is it good to do sprint/walk?..whereas the pros maybe do sprint/jog or sprint/run?

Whatever allows you to recover better. The sprinting part of the HIIT is the crucial part; if walking allows you to go harder or do more sprints in total, then I think it's worth sacrificing the extra calories you might burn via jogging during the "rest" period.

fixationdarknes
03-13-2005, 06:00 PM
It won't change anything regarding the effectiveness of the HIIT...if anything your body will probably respond more favourably because it's a new stimulus. The only thing it will change is the length of the sprint/rest intervals. If you're just starting out you'll probably have to sprint for less time and/or rest longer.

I wasn't talking about the effectiveness of the HIIT. I was talking about how I should go about doing HIIT.

And, being a newbie to HIIT, what would be a reasonable length of time for the sprinting and resting?

And do you guys bring stopwatches with you to be exact with the time intervals?

Jasonl
03-13-2005, 06:46 PM
I wasn't talking about the effectiveness of the HIIT. I was talking about how I should go about doing HIIT.

I'd just do it outside on a track or a long road, but you can do it on a treadmill, bike, stairstepper, etc...

And, being a newbie to HIIT, what would be a reasonable length of time for the sprinting and resting?

10-15 second sprint, 30-45 second rest

And do you guys bring stopwatches with you to be exact with the time


intervals?
I never have, I just have a specific place where I start sprinting and the same for when I stop. All-in-all my sprints and jogs are both about 30 seconds each

.

fixationdarknes
03-13-2005, 07:12 PM
I never have, I just have a specific place where I start sprinting and the same for when I stop. All-in-all my sprints and jogs are both about 30 seconds each.

But, what about when you get faster? Won't that make you eventually go past your landmarks in the same amount of time...resulting in you not pushing yourself to your potential because you'll be stopping before you 15 second sor 30 seconds are up?

Vido
03-13-2005, 08:00 PM
And, being a newbie to HIIT, what would be a reasonable length of time for the sprinting and resting?

Personally, I think it depends on what type of cardio you're using for HIIT. For sprints, something like an 8-10 second sprint, followed by maybe 30 seconds of rest. If you were on the stepper, that might change to a 20-30 second "sprint" followed by a 30 second "resting" period (slower pace).


And do you guys bring stopwatches with you to be exact with the time intervals?

No...Of course, if you're doing it in the gym, the equipment will have timers anyway.


But, what about when you get faster? Won't that make you eventually go past your landmarks in the same amount of time

So, just start running longer distances...

Jasonl
03-14-2005, 12:41 AM
So, just start running longer distances...
Bingo

RaginT
03-14-2005, 01:24 AM
when i do HIT, i do fixed distance sprints, ie line sprints on bbal court, they take like 30 sec to finish, with 1 min rest you will get fast at them as you practice, but you will still fee leach one as long as you run at full speed.

PowerManDL
03-14-2005, 05:22 AM
If you're out on the track running sprints, you do *not* want to do this maximally if you have multiple sessions per week.

Comparing this specific instance, whereby it would be detrimental, to other types of interval work isn't valid. Giving it your all on the stair stepper is a whole 'nother animal.

Beavereater
03-14-2005, 07:23 AM
"multiple sessions per week" means what? That you do your HIIT more than once a weeks?

Maybe I too have been doing it wrong.

I can hit the gym 4 times a week, and I do it right after 3 of my sessions. I don't do it on leg days. I get on the bike, moderate speed for 2 minutes, then in 1 minute intervals till 12 minutes...so 5 minutes worth of all out sprints, and 7 minutes of moderate paced. I hope to up that...

ryuage
03-14-2005, 07:24 AM
hrmm dont know what multiple mean? Here's a hint its not a single session.

fen2zla
03-14-2005, 07:59 AM
hrmm dont know what multiple mean? Here's a hint its not a single session.

lol :)

fixationdarknes
03-14-2005, 08:17 AM
So, just start running longer distances...

No, what I'm saying is...if you use landmarks as your distance points, how will you know when you have gotten faster? Because you don't have a stopwatch to time how long it took you to get to, say for example, that big tree over there.

But it probably doesn't even matter that much. And I'm probably thinking too much once again. -_-

PowerManDL
03-14-2005, 08:27 AM
But it probably doesn't even matter that much. And I'm probably thinking too much once again. -_-

Bingo.

If you're really that curious, go over to T-mag and look for an article from Christian Thibaudeau called "Running Man"

He covers some very good approaches.

fixationdarknes
03-14-2005, 08:31 AM
Bingo.

If you're really that curious, go over to T-mag and look for an article from Christian Thibaudeau called "Running Man"

He covers some very good approaches.

Alright. I'm going to go study Spanish now.

Beavereater
03-14-2005, 08:52 AM
hrmm dont know what multiple mean? Here's a hint its not a single session.

Sorry...my thinking was off...I don't know where I was going with that question. Let me re-think it... :bash:

hockfootball
05-04-2005, 12:33 AM
hrmm dont know what multiple mean? Here's a hint its not a single session.

Multiple-Having, relating to, or consisting of more than one individual, element, part, or other component; manifold.

True it is more than one but how many more is the real question "multiple" can mean 9 or 6 or 98298424 million. Beavereater you were probably wondering how many they ment when they said multiple, meaning you wanted an exact number.
100 percent 2 times a week is much easier than 7 times a week, not running around 100 to 90% defeats the purpose of high intensity training.