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Vampiro
03-19-2005, 12:55 AM
im reading Lyle's "rapid fat loss handbook" and along with your protein, you take fish oil caps for omega 3's. would flax oil caps be just as good ? , and is one source superior then the other?

Built
03-19-2005, 01:02 AM
Fish IS omega 3. Flax has to convert into it, IF your body wants it to.

Mine HATES it.

I take 10 g fish oil daily - wild salmon oil, whatever's on sale.

Vampiro
03-20-2005, 01:42 AM
if my body wants too?

Built
03-20-2005, 03:43 AM
As I understand it, some people's bodies aren't as good at converting the oil into omega 3. My body SUCKS at it, so I stick to fish oil.

foxy38
03-20-2005, 07:07 AM
I take both- 3 tbsp flax oil daily, and fish oil caps twice a day

Built- why do you say that your body sucks at converting the oil into omega 3?

Holto
03-20-2005, 10:13 AM
and women are usually better at converting the omega-3 in flax (ALA) to the more important omega-3's (DHA & EPA)

this is because as an infant develop's it needs the DHA for eye's, brain, intestines and other organs high in neurons (nerve cells)

fish oil has EPA and DHA pre-formed and is generally more effective

I take flax for my skin and my joints

I say this after droppign it for a while, thinking the fish oil would take care of me

Holto
03-20-2005, 10:17 AM
Built- why do you say that your body sucks at converting the oil into omega 3?

alot of North Americans have this problem

it's caused by polution and a deteriorated food supply

for example a bushel of grain from 1920 had 300 X the minerals of a bushel today

this is the main reason I buy as much organic as possible, to support responsible agriculture

the big corportions are guilty of things like mono-cropping where they grow the same crop on the same field year after year instead of rotating like a responsible farmer would

foxy38
03-20-2005, 10:26 AM
But how do you know if your body sucks at converting flax oil into Omega 3? I'm just wondering :)

shansen008
03-20-2005, 11:43 AM
Have their been experiments done to see if organically grown foods are higher in nutritional content? Id like to see em, ive been thinking of going that route but the stores are so expensive.

Holto
03-20-2005, 01:28 PM
Have their been experiments done to see if organically grown foods are higher in nutritional content?

yes and no

food can be organic and grown in soil that is depleted of minerals

if food is grown in soil higher in minerals the food will be higher in minerals etc...

Holto
03-20-2005, 01:29 PM
But how do you know if your body sucks at converting flax oil into Omega 3? I'm just wondering :)

best bet is to try some fish oil

if your memory, vision, cognitive function (etc..) improve and you were taking flax then you can assume your body is not great at converting it

and flax oil is omega3 I think that was a typo by Built

Built
03-20-2005, 01:33 PM
and flax oil is omega3 I think that was a typo by Built

I stand corrected:


Fish oil versus flax oil

There is considerable evidence that fish and fish oils are beneficial to heart health, reduce the risk of cancer, and benefit mental health. The "active" components of fish oils are eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), a polyunsaturated fatty acid with 20 carbon atoms in its backbone, and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a polyunsaturated fatty acid with 22 carbon atoms. Both are members of the omega-3 group of essential fatty acids. EPA and DHA are found exclusively in marine animals; fatty fish such as herring, sardines, salmon and fresh tuna are the best sources.

Alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) is another omega-3 fatty acid found in flaxseed and flaxseed oil. ALA has 18 carbon atoms in its backbone and can be converted to EPA in the body (in the liver) by the addition of two carbon atoms. EPA, in turn, can be converted to DHA. Because the typical American diet is relatively low in fish intake ALA becomes a crucial source of the EPA and DHA required for optimum health.

Researchers at the National Institutes of Health have just completed a study designed to determine just how much ALA is actually converted to EPA in the body. Their study included eight healthy subjects who were fed a standard diet for three weeks and then given one gram of ALA labeled with an isotope tracer. The diet was beef-based in order to avoid extraneous sources of EPA and DHA. The researchers measured blood plasma concentrations of ALA, EPA and DHA 8, 24, 48, 72, 96 and 168 hours after ingestion of the labeled ALA.
The results show that only about 0.2 per cent of the ALA (2 mg) was actually converted to EPA. In contrast, about 23 per cent of the EPA was available for conversion to DHA. The researchers also noted that the half-life (the time it takes to reduce initial concentration by 50 per cent) of ALA in blood plasma was quite low at about one hour. In comparison, the half-life of EPA was 67 hours and that of DHA 20 hours.

The researchers conclude that ALA is not a viable source of EPA and DHA and cannot replace fish and fish oils in the diet. Editor's Note: According to this new data a tablespoon of flax oil would only result in the synthesis of about 30 mg of EPA far less than the recommended daily intake of 220 mg.

Pawlosky, Robert J. Physiological compartmental analysis of alpha-linolenic acid metabolism in adult humans. Journal of Lipid Research, Vol. 42, August 2001, pp. 1257-65

I was confusing omega 3 with the ALA conversion to EPA, which is why fish oil is superior to flax oil for omega 3.

Holto
03-21-2005, 07:11 AM
exactly

I would have to assume my body is not great at converting flax

when I started the fish oil I noticed a huge improvement in memory

my right eye has a slight astigmatism, enough that I don't walk outside without sunglasses...now that I take fish oil I don't even know where my sunglasses are