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View Full Version : xylitol- great alternative to sugar?



waynis
03-21-2005, 05:59 PM
I was in the health food store and noticed they are now stocking containers of xylitol. It looks just like sugar but apparently does not have the bad effects sugar can. It's actually suppost to be good for your teeth and stabilize hormone and sugar levels. Excellent choice for hypoglycemics or diabetics or anyone trying to reduce sugar. It's been used for a while in foods and may be old news to some but i've never seen it sold like this before. Has anyone used it... hows the taste? I'am definetly thinking about using xylitol intead of splenda.

Here's a link http://www.laleva.cc/food/xylitol.html

Holto
03-21-2005, 07:12 PM
so it's like stevia but hopefully it's actually sweet

Built
03-21-2005, 07:27 PM
Isn't it a sugar alcohol? Watch out for GI distress if you take a lot of it.

Personally, I'm sticking to Splenda.

Holto
03-21-2005, 09:03 PM
I thought so too but the article says it comes from a bark

wow

Xylitol is a natural substance found in fibrous vegetables and fruit, as well as in corn cobs and various hardwood trees like birch. It is a natural, intermediate product which regularly occurs in the glucose metabolism of man and other animals, as well as in the metabolism of several plants and micro-organisms. Xylitol is produced naturally in our bodies; in fact, we make up to 15 grams daily during normal metabolism.

Although xylitol tastes and looks exactly like sugar, that is where the similarities end. Xylitol is really sugar's mirror image. While sugar wreaks havoc on the body, xylitol heals and repairs. It also builds immunity, protects against chronic degenerative disease, and has anti-aging benefits. Xylitol is considered a five-carbon sugar, which means it is an antimicrobial, preventing the growth of bacteria. While sugar is acid-forming, xylitol is alkaline enhancing. All other forms of sugar, including sorbitol, another popular alternative sweetener, are six-carbon sugars, which feed dangerous bacteria and fungi.

there is no way this tastes good

I make protein bars and this would be killer

waynis
03-22-2005, 10:57 AM
Isn't it a sugar alcohol? Watch out for GI distress if you take a lot of it.


yeah i used to think that too. This stuff seems amazing. A sweetner that's actually good for you:confused: It's completly natural as holto pointed out.
This is definetly better then stevia. Would taste more like sugar. Also stevia leaves after taste often. WIth me it burns my mouth. DID I mention it's good for you!!! this sounds too good to be true :D

TheGimp
03-22-2005, 11:43 AM
So how is it metabolised? Is it basically a carbohydrate? (~4 cals/g)

ectx
03-22-2005, 11:59 AM
I thought so too but the article says it comes from a bark

wow

Xylitol is a natural substance found in fibrous vegetables and fruit, as well as in corn cobs and various hardwood trees like birch. It is a natural, intermediate product which regularly occurs in the glucose metabolism of man and other animals, as well as in the metabolism of several plants and micro-organisms. Xylitol is produced naturally in our bodies; in fact, we make up to 15 grams daily during normal metabolism.

Although xylitol tastes and looks exactly like sugar, that is where the similarities end. Xylitol is really sugar's mirror image. While sugar wreaks havoc on the body, xylitol heals and repairs. It also builds immunity, protects against chronic degenerative disease, and has anti-aging benefits. Xylitol is considered a five-carbon sugar, which means it is an antimicrobial, preventing the growth of bacteria. While sugar is acid-forming, xylitol is alkaline enhancing. All other forms of sugar, including sorbitol, another popular alternative sweetener, are six-carbon sugars, which feed dangerous bacteria and fungi.

there is no way this tastes good

I make protein bars and this would be killer

Xylitol is a sugar alcohol like sorbitol. the description in the article calls it a mirror image of sugar (glucose, etc)...not true. In order for it to be its enantiomer (mirror image) it would need to have the same number of carbons. Glucose has 6 and xylitol has 5. I've never seen 5 carbon sugars described as antimicrobial. Xylitol would also have a laxitive effect as our bodies don't make enough of the enzyme to digest it and would need to ramp up producton of the enzyme.

Holto
03-22-2005, 12:01 PM
so it's a naturally occuring sugar alchohol ?

too bad I do find that stuff hard to digest

waynis
03-22-2005, 12:07 PM
i'am afraid to buy the whole container. It's 19 bucks. If I don't digest this well then it will be a waste of money. But it is a naturally occuring substance. Don't know if the xylitol in gum and bars is synthetic or what.

Bruise Brubaker
03-22-2005, 09:59 PM
I've read it's an antimicrobial because bacteries and fungii "eat" it but cannot proceed it and end up dying. In the mouth, the bacteria responsible for cavities mutates so it can tolerate it, but the new kind (streptoccocus mutans sp) does not stick as much to the teeth than the regular kind (streptoccocus mutans).
Somewhere in Scandinavia, can't remember what country, it's used in a lot of candies and there is a definitive diminution of cavities there. Here it can be found in small quantities in the gum Trident, I don't know if this gum is available everywhere in North America.

I remember having read articles against xylitol but I can't find them anymore.

waynis
03-23-2005, 11:01 AM
What I really like about it is that it can actually help control insulin levels. It's naturally found in food such as berries, mushrooms, and lettuce. But at very low amounts. I think I might try to find a sample pack and see how it digests.

BCC
03-23-2005, 11:27 AM
yeah i used to think that too. This stuff seems amazing. A sweetner that's actually good for you:confused: It's completly natural as holto pointed out.
This is definetly better then stevia. Would taste more like sugar. Also stevia leaves after taste often. WIth me it burns my mouth. DID I mention it's good for you!!! this sounds too good to be true :D

If stevia is leaving an after taste of burning your mouth you're most likely using too much. You do realize that stevia is hundreds of times sweeter than sugar. It only takes a speck on your fingernail to sweeten something up.

waynis
03-23-2005, 11:35 AM
If stevia is leaving an after taste of burning your mouth you're most likely using too much. You do realize that stevia is hundreds of times sweeter than sugar. It only takes a speck on your fingernail to sweeten something up.

I may just be allerigic to it though. I don't know if everyone experiences that. I used to take a protein powder that had stevia in it. Pro blend 55 I think it was called. Made the roof of my mouth burn along with my friends.

waynis
04-11-2005, 08:52 PM
Well i decided to buy a pound of this stuff. WELL my verdict is this stuff is great!! Haven't experienced any stomach issues due to it being a sugar alcohol and I react to everything. It says on the bottle don't use more then 20grams a day in case of diarhea. I probably take in 8-10 grams a day with no issues. I'am glad I bought this stuff and plan on continueing to buy it. Seems like the best natural alternative to sugar out there right now to me.

Vapour Trails
04-12-2005, 11:21 AM
Xylitol is a sugar alcohol like sorbitol. the description in the article calls it a mirror image of sugar (glucose, etc)...not true. In order for it to be its enantiomer (mirror image) it would need to have the same number of carbons. Glucose has 6 and xylitol has 5. I've never seen 5 carbon sugars described as antimicrobial. Xylitol would also have a laxitive effect as our bodies don't make enough of the enzyme to digest it and would need to ramp up producton of the enzyme.

I noticed that too. The are numerous other glaring errors. That's a slaes pitch, not an article based on fact.

IceRgrrl
04-15-2005, 07:37 AM
The "antimicrobial" IS misleading...I think that's an missstatement from a couple of dental studies that showed that fake sugar is less conducive to cavity formation than real sugar. BB was on the right track; bacteria in the nouth cannot feed on xylitol so they are less likely to grow, and thus the decreased incidence of cavities. But calling it "antimicrobial" is a stretch...something that kills established bacteria is not the same as providing an environment where the little buggers can't grow in the first place :)