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galileo
03-22-2005, 05:50 AM
I've been noticing in my comings and goings that there is quite a bit of research around the positive effects of alcohol, particularly wine, touting benefits from cardiopulmonary health to prevention of type II diabetes.

I'm well aware of the downfalls of overstepping the boundaries of alcohol consumption, but I thought it would be fun to discuss a game plan for maximizing the benefits of drinking small amounts of alcohol daily and mitigating the associated risks.

Does anyone here have extensive knowledge in this area or currently employ a regimen that includes wine/alcohol for health purposes?


Note : Inappropriate discussion will be removed.

raniali
03-22-2005, 12:01 PM
i think your best source of reference are those people from europe or greece who consume wine daily as part of their diet. i do have a friend/her husband who make a point to have at least a glass a night with their meal for the purported health benefits. she leans a bit on the holistic side of things though but is a generally healthy person.

from the studies and blurbs i have read, red wine is a better choice than white (color usually equates with added nutritional content as you well know) but beer has also shown some promise in consistent, minimal amounts.

galileo
03-22-2005, 12:14 PM
I'm looking to find something that addresses my concerns about alcohol blunting fat-loss. If anyone comes across something significant, please post!

MixmasterNash
03-22-2005, 12:18 PM
Alcohol alone has been shown to have health benefits, not just wine. Wine was originally studied as it was a regular part of the relatively quite healthy mediterranean lifestyle. Also, wine is rarely consumed in large quantities compared to beer or liquor, and so did not have the obvious negative health implications.

A beer a day is good for you and tastes good too!

galileo
03-22-2005, 12:22 PM
In particular, I believe wine contains specific phytochemicals that other alcohols don't, which likely has something to do with the fruit base. I've read that other alcohols are also good for you, but from what I've seen wine is the benchmark for positive effects.

MixmasterNash
03-22-2005, 12:25 PM
I'm looking to find something that addresses my concerns about alcohol blunting fat-loss. If anyone comes across something significant, please post!

Alcohol has been shown to minimize fat metabolism for a few hours after consumption, though it also increases your overall metabolic rate. Thus, alcohol plus a big fatty meal will cause more fat to be stored than without alcohol.
Furthermore, the appetizing effects of alcohol are probably more significant in total caloric terms than any issues related to surpressing fat metabolism.

However, I imagine that the suggested single serving will have minimal effect on fat loss compared to almost every other factor. Ie, any potential negative effect could probably be mitigated by 4 minutes of high-moderate activity any time before consumption of alcohol.

waynis
03-22-2005, 12:52 PM
here's a link with some good info. http://www.beekmanwine.com/prevtopab.htm

Maki Riddington
03-22-2005, 03:36 PM
I don't buy into the wine is good for you so drink it every day belief. As weight trainers, you'd think that we'd all be following a healthy approach to eating. Taking our vits, protein, getting enough healthy fats, eating fresh fruits and veggies and performing cardiovascular work. So why all the fuss over the benefits of drinking a glass of wine everyday?

Maybe for the sedentary.......

MixmasterNash
03-22-2005, 03:41 PM
I don't buy into the wine is good for you so drink it every day belief. As weight trainers, you'd think that we'd all be following a healthy approach to eating. Taking our vits, protein, getting enough healthy fats, eating fresh fruits and veggies and performing cardiovascular work. So why all the fuss over the benefits of drinking a glass of wine everyday?

Maybe for the sedentary.......

No, not just for the sedentary. Because, all other things being equal, drinking wine has been shown to have beneficial effects in protecting against some cancers and reducing rates of heart disease.

Yes, having a good diet is more important, as is exercise, but wine (and more generall, alcohol) can have a significant (in the scientific, statistical sense) health benefit.

waynis
03-22-2005, 03:47 PM
I don't buy into the wine is good for you so drink it every day belief. As weight trainers, you'd think that we'd all be following a healthy approach to eating. Taking our vits, protein, getting enough healthy fats, eating fresh fruits and veggies and performing cardiovascular work. So why all the fuss over the benefits of drinking a glass of wine everyday?


I think it's more just to justify drinking alcohol. I mean there's proof behind wine being benificial but like you said it's benifets are not something you cannot benifet from in a regular clean diet. Also a lot of wines benifets comes from grapes. Grapes have many anti-oxidant properties. The darker the better. The healthiest wine would have to be dark dry wine. Which doesn't contain much sugar at all.

Maki Riddington
03-22-2005, 03:51 PM
No, not just for the sedentary. Because, all other things being equal, drinking wine has been shown to have beneficial effects in protecting against some cancers and reducing rates of heart disease.

Yes, having a good diet is more important, as is exercise, but wine (and more generall, alcohol) can have a significant (in the scientific, statistical sense) health benefit.


I understand, but have you actually looked at who they use for these studies? How can we say that this then applies to those who are active and participate in a fitness oriented lifestyle? This reminds of this crazy dark choclate craze that's been on the news of late.

galileo
03-22-2005, 08:45 PM
I wouldn't drink it to get intoxicated, I'd drink a few ounces. That may get someone like Pete drunk, however.

Bruise Brubaker
03-22-2005, 09:43 PM
I've recently read an article from a naturopath and he said that the cons of drinking alcohol like wine were more important than the pros, especially for women.

Manveet
03-22-2005, 10:25 PM
I understand, but have you actually looked at who they use for these studies? How can we say that this then applies to those who are active and participate in a fitness oriented lifestyle? This reminds of this crazy dark choclate craze that's been on the news of late.


I agree, I'm quite skeptical of these types of studies myself. (ie food/beverage X leads to health benefit Y). I just see a huge problem with confounding variables in these types of studies. Furthermore, have there even been any longitudinal studies done on such topics?

galileo
03-23-2005, 07:20 AM
Rather than just espousing the skeptical viewpoint for these items, why not post studies and point out the issues?

Atomical
03-23-2005, 07:35 AM
Alcohol increases blood flow. Beer has chromium in it which allows rapid absorption of carbohydrates.

Manveet
03-23-2005, 10:11 PM
Rather than just espousing the skeptical viewpoint for these items, why not post studies and point out the issues?

I'm too lazy to research, but here's some stuff that I know/remember.

A lot of studies claim that a chemical called polyphenol is the beneficial ingredient in wine. For instance, people have noticed that the prevalence of certain cancers/diseases tend be lower in Mediterranean countries in comparison to Northern European nations, and the United States. But I'm unsure of how these studies utilized a control population. It could very well be the case that people living in the Mediterranean countries are just a lot more active than the Northern Europeans. Furthermore, there are dozens of other foods, such as olive oil, fish, fruits, nuts etc.. all of which have been said to contain beneficial properties. These foods are also consumed in large numbers by people living in the Mediterranean. This makes it difficult to discern the causal relationship between wine, and the reduction of some cancers.

Oh, and polyphenols can be found in non-alcoholic versions of red wine.

waynis
03-24-2005, 11:22 AM
Alcohol increases blood flow. Beer has chromium in it which allows rapid absorption of carbohydrates.

Chromium not only always absorption but controlls glucose levels. If you take a look at what alcohol does. At first it raises glucose levels but then gives a sudden drop later. I don't think the chromium in beer is that effective when alcohol is involved.