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Avatar
11-29-2001, 10:52 AM
which meal out of these 2 do you think is best for my last meal of the day before bed? While cutting.

Choice #1:

1 can Tuna
20g Almonds

Calories = 251
Carbs = 4g
Protein = 34g
Fat = 11g

Choice #2

1 cup 1% Cottage Cheese

Calories = 200
Carbs = 13g
Protein = 30g
Fat = 3g

I'm leaning towards the cottage cheese because of its excellent source of casein. The slow absorbing protein may help prevent catabolism while I sleep better than the tuna. The downside is it contains more carbs than the tuna and almonds. What is your opinions?

The_Chicken_Daddy
11-29-2001, 10:54 AM
will the difference of 9g really mess up your carb ratios for the day?

big calvin
11-29-2001, 10:54 AM
what are your goal right now?

Avatar
11-29-2001, 10:58 AM
cutting.

Is fat or carbs better before bed?

The_Chicken_Daddy
11-29-2001, 11:02 AM
Depends what studies you believe.

I would opt for little to zero carbs before bed when cutting and take some fat instead.

Hey, why not use some flax or olive oil on your tuna so you can have the protein, the fat and like trace carbs?

Avatar
11-29-2001, 11:05 AM
Originally posted by The_Chicken_Daddy
Depends what studies you believe.

I would opt for little to zero carbs before bed when cutting and take some fat instead.

Hey, why not use some flax or olive oil on your tuna so you can have the protein, the fat and like trace carbs?

cause flax gives me small break-outs. Must be the raised test.. I dunno.

Wizard
11-29-2001, 11:07 AM
The second meal.

The_Chicken_Daddy
11-29-2001, 11:09 AM
well i'd say lesser carbs and morer fat [generalised term, i'm not saying alter your meal plans]

but i doubt a difference of 9g carbs will be significant.

Tryska
11-29-2001, 11:13 AM
i agree with chigs.

on all points.


although, technically the carbs in the cottage cheese aren't going to necessarily stimulate a fat-storing insulin response. but you would be better off using a full-fat cottage cheese anyway.

Avatar
11-29-2001, 11:49 AM
Originally posted by Tryska

although, technically the carbs in the cottage cheese aren't going to necessarily stimulate a fat-storing insulin response. but you would be better off using a full-fat cottage cheese anyway.

why would I be better off using a full-fat cottage cheese? wouldn't I be getting lots of fat and carbs? I thought milk products were too high in saturated fats.

Tryska
11-29-2001, 11:52 AM
the carbs are lower in full-fat dairy products.

and my personal opinion is that saturated fats are really not that big of a deal.

Wizard
11-29-2001, 12:05 PM
C'mon.. satty fats are way badder than carbs.It's 10-12 times more difficult for your body to digest 'em.

Tryska
11-29-2001, 12:11 PM
well..i don't quite see it that way.

I think satty fats are bad in conjunction with lots of insulin-inducing carbs. (in your overall diet.)

no study has ever conclusively proved that saturated fats cause the myriad ailments that the AHA has been saying they do for the past 30 years. yet in the past 30 years, rates of heart disease and the other lovely syndrome X metabolic disorders have risen exponentially.....even though americans are happily munching away on fat free muffins slathered in fat free butter.

and that is all i have ot say on the subject. please don't y'all try to jump on me and convince me otherwise. i'm sick of this argument.

Wizard
11-29-2001, 12:13 PM
Originally posted by Tryska
I think satty fats are bad in conjunction with lots of insulin-inducing carbs. (in your overall diet.)

OK :)

ericg
11-29-2001, 12:16 PM
Originally posted by Tryska
well..i don't quite see it that way.

I think satty fats are bad in conjunction with lots of insulin-inducing carbs. (in your overall diet.)

no study has ever conclusively proved that saturated fats cause the myriad ailments that the AHA has been saying they do for the past 30 years. yet in the past 30 years, rates of heart disease and the other lovely syndrome X metabolic disorders have risen exponentially.....even though americans are happily munching away on fat free muffins slathered in fat free butter.

and that is all i have ot say on the subject. please don't y'all try to jump on me and convince me otherwise. i'm sick of this argument.

I understand your point. Makes sense to me, SLIGHTLY similar to a keto diet. I did say slightly.:cool:

Tryska
11-29-2001, 12:21 PM
hehe...well it ain't exactly dean ornish. *lol*

the doc
11-29-2001, 01:37 PM
i agree w/ ms tryska

hemants
11-30-2001, 07:35 AM
"no study has ever conclusively proved that saturated fats cause the myriad ailments that the AHA has been saying they do for the past 30 years"

Hmmmm

You may want to check out the New England Journal of Medicine Volume 337:1491-1499 November 20, 1997 Number 21


"Each increase of 5 percent of energy intake from saturated fat, as compared with equivalent energy intake from carbohydrates, was associated with a 17 percent increase in the risk of coronary disease (relative risk, 1.17; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.97 to 1.41; P = 0.10). "

and also...

"Our findings suggest that replacing saturated and trans unsaturated fats with unhydrogenated monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats is more effective in preventing coronary heart disease in women than reducing overall fat intake"

ericg
11-30-2001, 10:15 AM
Originally posted by Tryska
well..i don't quite see it that way.

I think satty fats are bad IN CONJUNCTION with lots of insulin-inducing carbs. (in your overall diet.)

no study has ever conclusively proved that saturated fats cause the myriad ailments that the AHA has been saying they do for the past 30 years. yet in the past 30 years, rates of heart disease and the other lovely syndrome X metabolic disorders have risen exponentially.....even though americans are happily munching away on fat free muffins slathered in fat free butter.

and that is all i have ot say on the subject. please don't y'all try to jump on me and convince me otherwise. i'm sick of this argument.

You guys/gals thinks it makes a difference how fats/carbs(high GI) and the body react when the two are consumed together?? seperate?? I think it does, but i am just going by "gut".

Tryska
11-30-2001, 10:21 AM
eric...yes.

2 things happen....the consistency of VLDL particles become denser and more tightly packed, when a diet is predominantly high in carbs, and secondly, the insulin rush causes damage to blood vessels, plaque attaches to these areas, and arteriosclerosis sets in.....

incidentally this isn't necessarily because you are eating carbs and fats at the same meal......this is systemic, and your overall diet needs to be considered.

Tryska
11-30-2001, 10:42 AM
ran across this while cruising through brinkzone....

http://www.brinkzone.com/dietfats.html