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View Full Version : DOes sugar cancel protien?..



Kylethechaotic
03-24-2005, 10:03 PM
And if it does, whats the percentage, i heard for every 5 grams of sugar, it cancels one gram of protien/...that true?. :bang:

GMCtrk
03-24-2005, 10:33 PM
no

wrestlemaniac
03-24-2005, 10:48 PM
well... Sugar does cause your body to store what you eat (usually as fat). that would be the closest effect to what you're saying that I could think of. I'm not gunna say "I wouldn't worry about it" because sugar is bad for you but not for this reason that you've stated.

shansen008
03-24-2005, 11:36 PM
Does not "cancel" protiein. Sugar provides an insulin response, so whatever you eat with it is gonna be shuttled into your bodies cells. Sorta. ;)

Think about it, the primary 2 ingredients in fast food = SUGAR+FAT.

Ever see the movie "Super Size Me"? If not go rent it, its very enlightening.


So eating protein with sugar isnt a bad thing necessarily...especially if youre on a bulk.

fixationdarknes
03-24-2005, 11:39 PM
Your body needs sugar.

Optimum08
03-25-2005, 12:14 AM
no to your question about sugar cancelling protein...but yes that u need sugar...especially in the form of hot tamales (the candy), sour patch kids....u name any kind of chewy, sugary, teeth decaying substance and it is a necessity for your body...mmmm candy :drooling:

Slim Schaedle
03-25-2005, 01:50 AM
well... Sugar does cause your body to store what you eat (usually as fat). that would be the closest effect to what you're saying that I could think of. I'm not gunna say "I wouldn't worry about it" because sugar is bad for you but not for this reason that you've stated.

What you are saying is very generalized, so for the benefit of obvious newbies, you might want to explain it further b/c you are borderline wrong.

To put sugar into a very wide perspective, all carbohydrates you eat are converted to glucose, and glucose is sugar.

jack_of_all
03-25-2005, 06:06 AM
it has always been my understanding that its just the reverse, if you really want to pack on some meat eating sugar will quickly shuttle the protein to your muscles with little getting left behind and wasted.

body
03-25-2005, 06:38 AM
Your body needs sugar.

are you sure it needs it?

TheGimp
03-25-2005, 06:55 AM
Your body needs sugar.

I think you'll find that carbohydrates are a non essential macronutrient.

Shao-LiN
03-25-2005, 08:13 AM
well... Sugar does cause your body to store what you eat (usually as fat). that would be the closest effect to what you're saying that I could think of. I'm not gunna say "I wouldn't worry about it" because sugar is bad for you but not for this reason that you've stated.

A bit general. Sugar does not store what you eat "usually as fat".

wrestlemaniac
03-25-2005, 11:54 AM
What you are saying is very generalized, so for the benefit of obvious newbies, you might want to explain it further b/c you are borderline wrong.

To put sugar into a very wide perspective, all carbohydrates you eat are converted to glucose, and glucose is sugar.

I didn't really wanna talk about the benifits of sugar cuz most newbies would start eating it by the handfull.

fixationdarknes
03-25-2005, 12:51 PM
I think you'll find that carbohydrates are a non essential macronutrient.

But what would be the best source for energy then? :scratch:

waynis
03-25-2005, 02:42 PM
Your body needs sugar.

YOUR body does not need sugar. It needs glucose whether it's from carbs, fats or proteins.

Built
03-25-2005, 04:26 PM
I think you'll find that carbohydrates are a non essential macronutrient.
:withstupi

Built
03-25-2005, 04:28 PM
But what would be the best source for energy then? :scratch:

For the most part, this depends on the activity level and type.

Do you have a specific question?

GMCtrk
03-25-2005, 04:28 PM
YOUR body does not need sugar. It needs glucose whether it's from carbs, fats or proteins.

*edit* whoops you know what your talking about. You don't NEED to ingest glucose, but your body must produce it in that case via gluconeogenesis. You can also use fatty acids for glycolysis

Built
03-25-2005, 04:32 PM
Okay, from http://www.elmhurst.edu/~chm/vchembook/604glycogenesis.html


Gluconeogenesis:

Gluconeogenesis is the process of synthesizing glucose from non-carbohydrate sources. The starting point of gluconeogenesis is pyruvic acid, although oxaloacetic acid and dihydroxyacetone phosphate also provide entry points. Lactic acid, some amino acids from protein and glycerol from fat can be converted into glucose. Gluconeogenesis is similar but not the exact reverse of glycolysis, some of the steps are the identical in reverse direction and three of them are new ones. Without going into detail, the general gluconeogenesis sequence is given in the graphic on the left.

Notice that oxaloacetic acid is synthesized from pyruvic acid in the first step. Oxaloacetic acid is also the first compound to react with acetyl CoA in the citric acid cycle. The concentration of acetyl CoA and ATP determines the fate of oxaloacetic acid. If the concentration of acetyl CoA is low and concentration of ATP is high then gluconeogenesis proceeds. Also notice that ATP is required for a biosynthesis sequence of gluconeogenesis.

Gluconeogenesis occurs mainly in the liver with a small amount also occurring in the cortex of the kidney. Very little gluconeogenesis occurs in the brain, skeletal muscles, heart muscles or other body tissue. In fact, these organs have a high demand for glucose. Therefore, gluconeogenesis is constantly occurring in the liver to maintain the glucose level in the blood to meet these demands.

GMCtrk
03-25-2005, 04:40 PM
Okay, from http://www.elmhurst.edu/~chm/vchembook/604glycogenesis.html


Gluconeogenesis:

Gluconeogenesis is the process of synthesizing glucose from non-carbohydrate sources. The starting point of gluconeogenesis is pyruvic acid, although oxaloacetic acid and dihydroxyacetone phosphate also provide entry points. Lactic acid, some amino acids from protein and glycerol from fat can be converted into glucose. Gluconeogenesis is similar but not the exact reverse of glycolysis, some of the steps are the identical in reverse direction and three of them are new ones. Without going into detail, the general gluconeogenesis sequence is given in the graphic on the left.

Notice that oxaloacetic acid is synthesized from pyruvic acid in the first step. Oxaloacetic acid is also the first compound to react with acetyl CoA in the citric acid cycle. The concentration of acetyl CoA and ATP determines the fate of oxaloacetic acid. If the concentration of acetyl CoA is low and concentration of ATP is high then gluconeogenesis proceeds. Also notice that ATP is required for a biosynthesis sequence of gluconeogenesis.

Gluconeogenesis occurs mainly in the liver with a small amount also occurring in the cortex of the kidney. Very little gluconeogenesis occurs in the brain, skeletal muscles, heart muscles or other body tissue. In fact, these organs have a high demand for glucose. Therefore, gluconeogenesis is constantly occurring in the liver to maintain the glucose level in the blood to meet these demands.

ehh, brings back bad memories from last semester....I had to remember all 11 (I think 11?) steps of that reaction along with all the enzymes :(

Built
03-25-2005, 04:42 PM
You've probably forgotten more about this stuff than I'll ever know. :rolleyes:

;)

TheGimp
03-25-2005, 06:28 PM
But what would be the best source for energy then? :scratch:

All I'm saying is that carbohydrates are not essential. As others have pointed out it is possible to synthesize glucose from non carbohydrate sources.

Having said this, for body builders desiring anabolism I would say that carbohydrates are pretty damn important. When you're following the generally accepted guildine of 1g/lb of bodyweight in protein a day it is likely that the limiting factor in muscle building is not protein but calorie intake. Given that around 25% of the calorie content of protein must be expended in order to digest it for energy, carbohydrates would be the preferred source for these calories.

Slim Schaedle
03-25-2005, 07:25 PM
I didn't really wanna talk about the benifits of sugar cuz most newbies would start eating it by the handfull.

I am not saying you should present the reasons why sugar can be good. I am saying you should carify what you say about sugar being bad and causing you to store what you eat.

As Shao-LiN mentioned, what you said is very general and is not exactly true unless you explain it further. I think that's something very important for newbies to know.

Shao-LiN
03-25-2005, 08:50 PM
ehh, brings back bad memories from last semester....I had to remember all 11 (I think 11?) steps of that reaction along with all the enzymes :(

2 years ago for me =P. I had a neat little diagram along with acronyms to help me remember. I quickly forgot it the following quarter =P.

body
03-26-2005, 08:02 AM
But what would be the best source for energy then? :scratch:

Notice the word "ESSENTIAL". he said there essential. They are not "ESSENTIAL".

Your asking what is "OPTIMAL"? which is completely different question.

And define how you mean best source of enegry as well. Eg qucik fix. long term.
That may be another thread. though as you like asking question. You probably ask it anyway ;)