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View Full Version : Count protein from vegetables, rice, etc. ?



Collegekid
03-25-2005, 06:46 PM
I know this question was asked before, but I was just wondering if everyone counts incomplete proteins (rice, vegetables, etc) in their daily protein count. For example, if I have rice, chicken and vegetables for dinner, that's like 10g of protein from the rice and vegetables......

smalls
03-25-2005, 06:57 PM
I dont, better to get more than less.

Slim Schaedle
03-25-2005, 07:02 PM
If two foods with incomplete amino acid profiles are combined in one meal, then they can be useful.
You could count it in that case.
I don't bother.

Double D
03-25-2005, 08:39 PM
I would recommend making sure you get AT LEASET 1g/ib of protein from solid protein sources, like meat, whey etc. Then the rest can be whatever complete/incomplete to reach your goal. The main thing is that you get the cals.

TheGimp
03-25-2005, 08:48 PM
Count it

Vido
03-25-2005, 09:09 PM
I dont, better to get more than less.

:withstupi

Manveet
03-26-2005, 05:02 PM
I count it

Optimum08
03-26-2005, 05:10 PM
I dont, better to get more than less.

Im with Vido and smalls....

body
03-26-2005, 06:50 PM
I count it.

however even though veg protien quality is low. I doubt most people on here are getting more than 10grams of protein from fruit and veg a day.
so when you aiming for eg 200 grams. wether you include that 10 grams of protien from veg, its not going to make that much difference

waynis
03-26-2005, 06:54 PM
don't count em cause usually they aren't complete protein sources.

dissipate
03-27-2005, 02:10 AM
i use software to keep track of my calories and it counts it in so i do :P

Joe Black
03-27-2005, 02:34 AM
Its not going to make much difference.

You should count it as it equates to your overall calorie count, which is probably more important than the ratio itself.

Having said that - as the guys say its going to be pretty low and won't make too much difference.

Vido
03-27-2005, 02:38 AM
You should count it as it equates to your overall calorie count, which is probably more important than the ratio itself.

Oh, you should definitely count the calories from it. I would just aim to be getting your 1g/lb bodyweight (or whatever the individual might be aiming for) from quality sources.

BigMatt
03-27-2005, 06:30 PM
Count Protein from Muscle building food.

Whey,Eggs,Casein,Fish,Beef,Chicken thats about it

body
03-28-2005, 06:43 AM
but if you eat enough vegies you can build muscle from it. it all helps.
otherwise vegans would die

BigMatt
03-28-2005, 11:30 AM
but if you eat enough vegies you can build muscle from it. it all helps.
otherwise vegans would die

In term of muscle building...nah

TheGimp
03-28-2005, 11:46 AM
In term of muscle building...nah

Why not?

Vapour Trails
03-28-2005, 02:19 PM
Actually, regarding so-called 'incomplete' proteins, with a few exceptions (gelatin) there is no such thing. Protein from any food source has all the essential amino acids, just not aways in levels as high as say, meat.

Actually, even calling certain AAs essential and non-essential is outdated, all amino acids are essential for life. The modern terms are dispensible and indispensible.

Minotaur
03-29-2005, 08:44 AM
I know this question was asked before, but I was just wondering if everyone counts incomplete proteins (rice, vegetables, etc) in their daily protein count. For example, if I have rice, chicken and vegetables for dinner, that's like 10g of protein from the rice and vegetables......

Count it. The body doesn't use 'protein', it uses amino acids to make proteins it needs. It will mix and match and recycle.

body
04-02-2005, 04:43 AM
In term of muscle building...nah


can't vegans build muscle?

getfit
04-02-2005, 04:45 AM
Why not?
:withstupi please explain why?

AzBboy
04-02-2005, 07:19 AM
By all means, COUNT IT! BUT, just make sure you complete the proteins, for they do lack amino acids and make a percentage of the protein in them un-usable (exception: soybeans. Soybeans are a complete protein.) Heres a guide how to mix and match your grains, dairy, nuts/seeds and legumes (beans) to make them complete proteins: grains and dairy complete eachother ( pastas and cheeses, a sandwich w/ cheese in it, milk in cereal ect) grains and legumes complete eachother (beans and rice, beans in tortilla ect) legumes and dairy complete eachother (beans and cheese, cottage cheese and beans ect) dairy and nuts and seeds complete eachother (lowfat yogurt w/ mixed nuts, peanut butter on bread) and nuts and seeds and beans complete eachother. So, every time you have one, make sure you have another with it so you can complete it and make it usable. Even just a tiny portion will complete a heaping portion, so dont be afraid to go skimpy on one item if you are concernd about adding too much cals.

Vapour Trails
04-03-2005, 10:57 AM
By all means, COUNT IT! BUT, just make sure you complete the proteins, for they do lack amino acids and make a percentage of the protein in them un-usable (exception: soybeans. Soybeans are a complete protein.) Heres a guide how to mix and match your grains, dairy, nuts/seeds and legumes (beans) to make them complete proteins: grains and dairy complete eachother ( pastas and cheeses, a sandwich w/ cheese in it, milk in cereal ect) grains and legumes complete eachother (beans and rice, beans in tortilla ect) legumes and dairy complete eachother (beans and cheese, cottage cheese and beans ect) dairy and nuts and seeds complete eachother (lowfat yogurt w/ mixed nuts, peanut butter on bread) and nuts and seeds and beans complete eachother. So, every time you have one, make sure you have another with it so you can complete it and make it usable. Even just a tiny portion will complete a heaping portion, so dont be afraid to go skimpy on one item if you are concernd about adding too much cals.

I guess you didn't read my post.

"In the past, dietary proteins were classified as complete, meaning that all indispensable AAs were present ; or incomplete, meaning that one or more of the indispensable AAs was absent. However, with few exceptions (e.g. gelatin) every dietary protein contains all of the AAs in varying amounts. This means that the concept of 'complete' and 'incomplete' proteins is incorrect."

http://www.karlloren.com/diet/p48.htm

Not trying to be an ass, but people should be informed on the truth. The concept of complete and incomplete proteins is 20 years old.

TheGimp
04-03-2005, 11:05 AM
VT,

While you're right that proteins are not incomplete, only limited, if I'm not mistaken amino acids are only stored in the amino acid pool for about 4 hours and therefore it may be advisable to take combination into account, depending on the frequency and content of meals.