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Hazerboy
05-11-2005, 05:18 PM
On the bodybuilding forum, there's a sticky on "what a bodybuilder eats," why isn't there one for "what a powerlifter eats?" is this because a powerlifter doesn't really need to eat a lot (if you're looking to gain only strength, not mass) just ample protein and "healthy" foods?

Also, I was checking out the speed work done on dynamic work days for westside and other routines, and they state doing 10 sets or so of doubles of 50-60 percent of your max. I haven't really tried this, but this doesn't really seem like it would be very challenging or really get me sore. I also understand that getting sore is not a must for gaining strength. So lets say I do my 10 sets of doubles of 95 pounds for bench and I work really hard. Even though I probably won't get sore or exhausted, my CNS will get stronger and my explosions will get better, right?

Paul Stagg
05-11-2005, 06:29 PM
One could apply the 'What a bodybuilder eats' to a powerlifter... the main issue with powerlifting is getting enough protein and enough calories. It's just not as big a focus, but I think successful PLers, just like any athlete, are going to be focused on sound nutrition.

DE squatting using 10 sets of 2 with 50-60% is hard if you do it right. I think my DE squat day is the hardest day of the week. Getting sore has absolutley nothing to do with getting stronger, get that out of your head.

Training using the DE method makes you faster, and helps you create more force.

Hazerboy
05-11-2005, 08:37 PM
That's what I keep hearing; but why is that? why do you not need to get sore to get stronger? That's usually an indication for me that I'm either out of shape (If I haven't done sprints in awhile) or I had a good workout.

spencerjrus
05-12-2005, 12:38 AM
That's what I keep hearing; but why is that? why do you not need to get sore to get stronger? That's usually an indication for me that I'm either out of shape (If I haven't done sprints in awhile) or I had a good workout.


Soreness is an indicator of how hard you worked the muscle relative to what its used to, nothing more.

Sensei
05-12-2005, 05:50 AM
That's what I keep hearing; but why is that? why do you not need to get sore to get stronger? That's usually an indication for me that I'm either out of shape (If I haven't done sprints in awhile) or I had a good workout.

No, soreness tells you only that you have trained too hard. I suppose if you are young or are using then you can probably handle it, but as you get older and the aches and pains and injuries get more frequent and longer lasting you'll start to understand.

Also, how many times have you just said "I'd like to train, but I'm just too sore....". DOMS, when it's severe, can screw up productive training more than any benefit that training could have produced.

A little soreness here and there is unavoidable, but training FOR it is foolish. Properly planned out programs and workouts should eliminate a lot of that.

Hazerboy
05-12-2005, 05:20 PM
No, soreness tells you only that you have trained too hard. I suppose if you are young or are using then you can probably handle it, but as you get older and the aches and pains and injuries get more frequent and longer lasting you'll start to understand.

Also, how many times have you just said "I'd like to train, but I'm just too sore....". DOMS, when it's severe, can screw up productive training more than any benefit that training could have produced.

A little soreness here and there is unavoidable, but training FOR it is foolish. Properly planned out programs and workouts should eliminate a lot of that.

Hmmm makes sense. I've never really had the problem of being to sore to train though, unless I just haven't in a looong time (couple months!). I usually have a good 4 days between training the same muscle group. I don't really train *to* get sore either, what I meant was that I know I had a good workout if the next day I can feel it in my legs from squats or arms from triceps. But from my understanding, if you're only training for strength this doesn't really matter, because you're training your CNS? What about if you're training for mass? If you're training for mass then isn't it necessary to get sore, because that is an indicator that you have *ripped* your muscles up enough and now they're going to get bigger? OR, is soreness not caused by muscle tears at all, but something else?

WBBIRL
05-13-2005, 01:38 PM
Just a few things... what are PR, DOMS, DE, and CNS????? I dont know what those abrevations mean and dont want to coment on this topic without that knowledge.

drew
05-13-2005, 01:46 PM
DOMS = Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness
DE = Dynamic Effort
CNS = Central Nervous System

I agree with Paul, DE squat day is probably the toughest of the week.

Future Marine
05-13-2005, 04:05 PM
PR I'm pretty sure is personal record. Unless they're talking about something else.

bIgHwN86
05-13-2005, 06:13 PM
Personal Record=PR