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View Full Version : Yes, it is safe to eat raw eggs!



MasterOfPuppets
05-30-2005, 06:40 AM
I will try to be thorough, take notes if necessary so you may pass this info on to others young body builders, who will undoubtedly ask this question every week from now until the end of time. this is just a summary of about 10,000 egg articles I've read

Yes you can eat raw eggs/whites, but the whole eggs or carton eggs must be pasteurized (it will say so on the carton). Pasteurization is when they heat the egg/egg product enough to kill all the bacteria (including salmonella) and the protein digestion inhibitors (usually126-140 degrees). If you eat non-pasteurized eggs/egg products your body cannot utilize the protein in them due to the presence of a protein inhibitor. And while you may get salmonella from raw eggs/egg product the chances are 1 in 10,000 for regular eggs and 1 in 30,000 for free range eggs.

Avidin is a glycoprotein, which is found in raw egg whites, and blocks the uptake of Vitamin B6 and Vitamin H (Biotin) causing a vitamin deficiency (it binds to Biotin and iron making them unavailable). You must cook/pasteurize the egg white to neutralize the Avidin and allow your body to safely digest the protein and utilize all its amino acids. Cooking egg whites at high temperatures denatures some of the amino acids which makes the proteins slightly less effective (slower digesting). A soft boiled or poached egg (at 70% albumin coagulation) is digested much easier as opposed to a fried or hard boiled egg. 2 soft boiled/poached eggs spend less than 2 hours in the stomach being digested, where 2 fried/hard boiled eggs spend over 3 hours in the stomach. Although fried/hard cooked eggs are digested just as completely as soft cooked eggs, it just takes longer for them to be completely digested and assimilated.

An egg white is about 10% protein and 90% water. It’s the proteins that cause the egg white to solidify when you cook it. Egg white proteins are long chains of amino acids. In a raw egg, these proteins are curled and folded to form a compact ball. Weak bonds between amino acids hold the proteins in this shape—until you turn up the heat. When heated, the weak bonds break and the protein unfolds. Then its amino acids form weak bonds with the amino acids of other proteins, a process called coagulation. The resulting network of proteins captures water, making a soft, digestible gel.

If you keep the heat turned up too high or too long when you cook an egg, the proteins in the egg white form more and more bonds, squeezing some of the water out of the protein network and making the egg white rubbery and increasing their digestion time.

So, basically the most bioavailable and readily assimilated egg proteins are either pasteurized raw eggs/egg products or soft cooked/poached eggs that have not reached 160 degrees at which point the proteins become coagulated/denatured and take longer to be completely digested and assimilated. I hope this helps clear up some questions .

If you want to save some money you can do this at home.It is possible to pasteurize eggs at home - and easily, too! Pasteurization is simply a process of heating a food to a specific temperature for a specific amount of time - designed to kill specific bacteria. It is known that salmonella bacteria are killed at temperatures of 140 degrees in about 3 1/2 minutes (or a higher temperature in less time). If a room temperature egg is held in a bowl of warm water - say, 142 degrees to be safe - for 3 1/2 minutes, the bacteria will be killed and the protein inhibitor neutralized. It takes 5 minutes for extra large or jumbo eggs.

Place the room temperature eggs in a colander, and lower them into a pan or bowl of 142-degree water. Use an instant-read thermometer to be sure of the water temperature, and leave the thermometer in the water, to be sure that the temoerature is maintained. For medium or large eggs, leave them in the water for 3 1/2 minutes; for extra large or jumbo eggs, allow 5 minutes. Then remove the eggs, dry them, and refrigerate them, in a tightly-covered container.

Eggs begin to cook at about 160 degrees, and will be "scrambled eggs" at 180 - but if the 142 degree temperature is maintained, the result is a safe egg that will act like a raw egg in recipes and will provide a fully usable protein source.

All credit due to: The Doc from www.ironmass.com

mihorne
05-30-2005, 11:08 AM
cooked eggs taste better?

shootermcgavin7
05-30-2005, 03:01 PM
Yes you can eat raw eggs/whites, but the whole eggs or carton eggs must be pasteurized (it will say so on the carton). Pasteurization is when they heat the egg/egg product enough to kill all the bacteria (including salmonella) and the protein digestion inhibitors (usually126-140 degrees). If you eat non-pasteurized eggs/egg products your body cannot utilize the protein in them due to the presence of a protein inhibitor. And while you may get salmonella from raw eggs/egg product the chances are 1 in 10,000 for regular eggs and 1 in 30,000 for free range eggs.



I thought the odds were even higher than this; but if the number is true, and you eat 5 eggs a day, (i.e., thats 1,825 eggs/year) then you're getting salmonella once every 5 years. Not so much fun now, is it?

largelegsbuthot
05-30-2005, 03:39 PM
I thought the odds were even higher than this; but if the number is true, and you eat 5 eggs a day, (i.e., thats 1,825 eggs/year) then you're getting salmonella once every 5 years. Not so much fun now, is it?
Yes, but it is also fair to say that you could get salmonella from pretty much anything you eat, raw or cooked.

Edit was not preformed, tried to use my own quote, didn't work. Quote is as originally printed.

shootermcgavin7
05-30-2005, 03:49 PM
Yes, but it is also fair to say that you could get salmonella from pretty much anything you eat, raw or cooked.



Really? Care to prove that Salmonella is just as prevalent in cooked foods as it is in raw?

largelegsbuthot
05-30-2005, 04:02 PM
Really? Care to prove that Salmonella is just as prevalent in cooked foods as it is in raw?
Ever heard of food poisoning? No form of cooking fully kills all forms of salmonella or e-coli unless it is chared black and burned all the way through.
Containation could happen to certain food items such as poultry at the slaugterhouse, contamination which cannot be killed completely through methods which most people prepare their foods, however, conventional cooking times usually kill most harmful bacteria. I can see your argument though, it's a bigger risk with raw foods.

shootermcgavin7
05-30-2005, 04:13 PM
Ever heard of food poisoning?

I sure have. I'm still waiting on your unveiling of statistics showing that its no less safe to eat uncooked food than cooked food.


I can see your argument though, it's a bigger risk with raw foods.


This, I agree with. I'm just trying to figure out why you spent all but the last part of your post arguing against your own point.

largelegsbuthot
05-30-2005, 04:22 PM
I sure have. I'm still waiting on your unveiling of statistics showing that its no less safe to eat uncooked food than cooked food.

I'm sorry, but where did I print anywhere in the above statement that salmonella was "JUST AS PREVELENT IN COOKED FOODS AS IT IS IN RAW FOODS"?
I believe all I mentioned was that you "could get salmonella in cooked foods".

shansen008
05-30-2005, 07:13 PM
I love you both....<3

Ti1301
05-31-2005, 01:36 PM
I'm sticking to cooked.

ZDrax
06-14-2005, 09:43 PM
Problem with this is the issue of protein uptake. You only get about 70% of the protein from an egg when eaten uncooked vs. 95%+ when cooked.

Shao-LiN
06-14-2005, 10:25 PM
Unless the egg is pasteurized, which means it virtually has been cooked.

Drai's
06-15-2005, 09:04 AM
Problem with this is the issue of protein uptake. You only get about 70% of the protein from an egg when eaten uncooked vs. 95%+ when cooked.

:withstupi

Not to mention cooked eggs taste a lot better.

ZDrax
06-15-2005, 10:46 AM
Well, the studies I've seen only compared raw vs. fully cooked. Honestly I can't speak for the effect pasteurization has, but I'd be inclined to say it is atleast somewhat inferior to a fully cooked egg. so my eggs are staying cooked.

It also reeks of the sort of myths propagated by bodybuilders and wannabes who saw Rocky during the 80s that have no basis on reality.

Ataraxis
06-15-2005, 12:04 PM
Your numbers about the probability of getting salmonella from eggs while raw aren't as slim as you think. Here are some interesting numbers for ya:

Your chances of getting salmonella 1 or more times in a year if you eat 4 raw eggs a day, and the eggs are 'regular': 13.5%

Your chances of getting salmonella 1 or more times in a year if you eat 4 raw eggs a day, and the eggs are 'free range': 4.7%

Your chances of getting salmonella 1 or more times in a year if you eat 6 raw eggs a day, and the eggs are 'regular': 19.6%

Your chances of getting salmonella 1 or more times in a year if you eat 6 raw eggs a day, and the eggs are 'free range': 7.0%

These numbers are only probabilities (nothing about them is absolute). They are generated using a binomial distribution for those who care. This was only meant to be some food for thought.

TheGimp
06-15-2005, 12:41 PM
Honestly I can't speak for the effect pasteurization has, but I'd be inclined to say it is atleast somewhat inferior to a fully cooked egg. so my eggs are staying cooked.

Well you're wrong. The pasteurization process involves heating the egg to approximately 120C and this is more than enough to denature the avidin.

spencerjrus
06-15-2005, 01:31 PM
Well you're wrong. The pasteurization process involves heating the egg to approximately 120C and this is more than enough to denature the avidin.




Yes.

Woodward
06-15-2005, 03:30 PM
so straight out of the shell is just fine as long as it's pastuerized?

Shao-LiN
06-15-2005, 07:20 PM
Well, the studies I've seen only compared raw vs. fully cooked. Honestly I can't speak for the effect pasteurization has, but I'd be inclined to say it is atleast somewhat inferior to a fully cooked egg. so my eggs are staying cooked.

It also reeks of the sort of myths propagated by bodybuilders and wannabes who saw Rocky during the 80s that have no basis on reality.

The egg is heated enough to denature the proteins and break down the avidin, so they are not inferior. They are pretty much the same. The only difference is that it remains in a liquid state. Whether you prefer to use it or not is up to you. I find it convenient as I can throw it in shakes if I want to, or cook it if I prefer to cook it.