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View Full Version : Should I add weight to my rotator cuff exercise?



APE.
06-01-2005, 08:00 AM
Over a yr. ago I had posted a question regarding training rotator cuffs; being that I had twitching in that area.I began training them an the problem was pretty much solved; there was no more twitching an as a nice side effect my bench went up.(Yes I know I probly should have been training them from the start) After all this time I've trained with 15lb. dumbells at the max and that is mainly because every article I have ever read says not to go to strenous on these.The articles always refer to using 5lbs-10lb or 15lb dumbells but never more.

Now being that my bench has plateaued, would going any heavier strengthen them more so allowing me to possibly go through this plateau? Are do ya'll think going heavier would just be asking for trouble?I've typically been doing Scarecrows an laying on my side an turning the arm out in L form.

Any help is appreciated.

Isaac Wilkins
06-01-2005, 08:06 AM
If you're strong enough, go ahead and add weight.

Do it VERY slowly and keep the reps high. In addition to being somewhat dangerous with heavy weight people tend to let their delts take over in order to get more weight up. Keep the movements very strict. I honestly can't see more than 15 or 20 pounds being useful on those exercises unless you're a 400-500 bencher or more.

drew
06-01-2005, 08:10 AM
If you can do them easily, then add weight.

Sensei
06-01-2005, 12:04 PM
Now being that my bench has plateaued, would going any heavier strengthen them more so allowing me to possibly go through this plateau? Are do ya'll think going heavier would just be asking for trouble?I've typically been doing Scarecrows an laying on my side an turning the arm out in L form.

I think it's fine to go a little heavier if it is easy and you are using good technique. But, if you've been working them, I don't think rotator cuff work is going to do much for your plateau... I would work on hitting the triceps and upper back hard first and seeing if that makes a difference.