PDA

View Full Version : Fats in Postworkout Meal



YungLifter
06-28-2005, 02:54 PM
Hey I need to know if I should have 0g of fat in my post wporkout meal or is it ok to have like around 10g? B/c I find it very hard to have 0 g of fat in a post workout meal.

MasterOfPuppets
06-28-2005, 03:00 PM
It slows down digestion. I'd shoot for 0g. What makes it so hard to get 0g?

MOP

YungLifter
06-28-2005, 03:02 PM
Well rice has lik 1g of fat each 1/4 cup and i eat about 3/4cup so thats 3g, black beans has about 1g fat every half cup and I eat about a cup, and chicken has like 1gof fat every 4ounces and I eat about 8oz so thats what um like 7g of fat and I like to put about 1/3 of tbsp of olive oil in my rice when its boiling so that its not as hard and taste little better so that would come out to about 10 or little more.

YungLifter
06-28-2005, 04:37 PM
So do you guys think its ok to have minimal fats in a postworkout meal(about 10g's)?

waynis
06-29-2005, 05:45 PM
your fine. YOu will still see good results. I gained over 10lbs of solid lbm last year and I never followed the simple carb/no fat postworkout rule. I just maintain constant nutrients eating every 3-4 hours.

Manveet
06-29-2005, 09:16 PM
If I heard correctly, liquid fats should not be a problem post workout.

trainerSI
06-30-2005, 10:12 AM
Fats I think are fairly misunderstood by most people. There are basically two kinds of fats, the good kind ( HDL) and the bad kinds ( ldl). HDL comes from plant sources and have no trans fats in them or cholesterol. LDL comes from animal sources and carry the cholesterol and trans fats which if too much is injested, can be potentially bad for you.

Fats /cholesterols and triglycerides are essential to your diet and you do need a certain amount of them to stay healthy. Avoiding fats in any meal is just about impossible, but you can watch the amounts of LDL you eat just by reading the contents. A post workout meal should yes, have a high degree of fast absorbing carbs ( whey) and should also carry some protein sources as well. Tuna is a great low fat source of protein for a post workout meal unless you supplement with an MRP or protein drink.

Even if you get a bit of animal fats in your post workout meal, its not going to sabotage your lifting. Good sources of Omega 6 and Omega 3 fats are fishoils, nut oils, flax seed and EVOO ( extra virgin olive oil..cold press extraced) not just regular olive oil which is heat extraced and breaks down the nutritional values.

Desire, Dedication, Discipline

Holto
06-30-2005, 10:49 AM
erh?

cholesterol essential ?

pfc3rex
06-30-2005, 11:37 AM
You say to read the labels, will the fats be listed as a HDL or IDL ? if not can you scan a copy of any food label, and point out what we should all be looking at?

trainerSI
06-30-2005, 12:21 PM
fats listed on labels are listed as trans fats, saturated fats and total fats. Like I explained previously, LDL fats are those coming from meat sources which carry a high amount of trans fatty acids and saturated fats. Vegatble sources have low saturated fats and no contents of trans fats.

Cholesterol is a common name for the combination of HDL and LDL amounts found in the bloodstream. Instead of typing the entire thing out, just read the link I provide below....
http://hcd2.bupa.co.uk/fact_sheets/html/cholesterol.html

This breaks it down for layman understandings.

Fats are needed for basic survival such as the obvious....stored energy for lean times, padding around vital organs against shock , trauma or severe impacts to the body, and breast development, and not so obvious functions as nerve functions, nutrition transportation in the blood stream to name a few....

Desire, Dedication, Discipline

ryuage
06-30-2005, 12:33 PM
what kind of meat are you eating that contains trans fatty acids?

trainerSI
06-30-2005, 01:04 PM
ANY meat source contains trans fats and saturated fats.

amounts of these fats are determined by the amount of fats found in the meats.

high fat meats are pork, low grade beef, game, wild fowl

moderate fats are in the better grades of beef, dark meat chicken, some fish, dark meat in chicken, and some exotic meast such as osterich, & buffalow.

low amounts of fats are found in tuna, leaner beef, chicke breasts

combining protein and carbs as a meal.....when you eat protein, the fats are always present unless you go total suppelemtation like MRPs or protien drinks w/o adding milk .

Real food sources are the main stay in anyones diet and if they depend on supplemetation for their diets, they are going down the wrong path. All you have to do is monitor the types of meats that you eat and that will take care of the amounts of fats you get in your diet. If you get fats, its not going to make your lifting goals come to a complete stop. Dont get micro- organizational over your diet. Eat healthy without going over board, use common sense and you will be just fine.

ryuage
06-30-2005, 01:24 PM
Trans fatty acids, also known as trans fat, is an artery-clogging fat that is formed when vegetable oils are hardened into margarine or shortening. It is found in many other foods besides margarine and shortening, however, including fried foods like french fries and fried chicken, doughnuts, cookies, pastries and crackers. In the United States, typical french fries have about 40 percent trans fatty acids and many popular cookies and crackers range from 30 percent to 50 percent trans fatty acids. Doughnuts have about 35 percent to 40 percent trans fatty acids.

hrmm....

Wannabelean
06-30-2005, 06:07 PM
I use natural PB in all of my PWO shakes and my gains are still fine. It probably doesn't matter as much as you think. Just my opinion

Built
06-30-2005, 06:43 PM
fats listed on labels are listed as trans fats, saturated fats and total fats. Like I explained previously, LDL fats are those coming from meat sources which carry a high amount of trans fatty acids and saturated fats. Vegatble sources have low saturated fats and no contents of trans fats.

Cholesterol is a common name for the combination of HDL and LDL amounts found in the bloodstream. Instead of typing the entire thing out, just read the link I provide below....
http://hcd2.bupa.co.uk/fact_sheets/html/cholesterol.html

This breaks it down for layman understandings.

Fats are needed for basic survival such as the obvious....stored energy for lean times, padding around vital organs against shock , trauma or severe impacts to the body, and breast development, and not so obvious functions as nerve functions, nutrition transportation in the blood stream to name a few....

Desire, Dedication, Discipline


I think you're confusing HDL and LDL (types of cholesterol) with saturated and unsaturated (types of fat).

From wikipedia: (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lipoprotein)


A lipoprotein is a biochemical assembly that contains both proteins and lipids and may be structural or catalytic in function. Lipoproteins may be enzymes, proton pumps, ion pumps, or some combination of these functions. Examples include the high density and low density lipoproteins of the blood and the transmembrane proteins of the mitochondrion and the chloroplast.

From wikipedia: (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saturated_fat)

A saturated fat is a fat or fatty acid in which there are no double bonds between the carbon atoms of the fatty acid chain (hence, it is fully saturated with hydrogen atoms). Saturated fats tend to be solid at room temperature. Diets high in saturated fat correlate in some studies with an increased incidence of atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. Dehydrogenation converts saturated fats to unsaturated fats, while hydrogenation accomplishes the reverse.

Common saturated fats include butter, ghee, suet, tallow, lard, coconut oil, cottonseed oil and palm oil. Saturated fat is found in dairy products, especially cream and cheese and in meat as well as in many prepared foods.

Many studies suggest replacing saturated fats in the diet with unsaturated fats will increase one's ratio of HDL to LDL serum cholesterol.

Alternatives to saturated fats include monounsaturated fats such as olive oil and polyunsaturated fats such as canola oil and corn oil.


Controversy
It has been alleged that the many studies of saturated fat in the diet did not distinguish between saturated fat and trans fat. Some claim that saturated fat (in the absence of trans fat) is healthful; for example, foods such as peanuts and peanut butter contain saturated fat but have no added partially hydrogenated vegetable oil.


Furthermore, while there are small amounts of naturally occurring trans fats in saturated animal fat, a) we're talking very small proportions and b) they're NOT the same as artificial trans fats, and your body knows the difference. For example, conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is a naturally occurring trans fat with health-giving properties.


...natural trans fatty acid like CLAs (conjugated linoleic acids) present in meat and dairy products play a specific role on plasma lipids and cardiovascular function. [Khosla P, Fungwe TV, Conjugated Linoleic Acid: Effects on Plasma Lipids and Cardiovascular Function; Curr Opin Lipidol 2001, 12 :1231-4]

Finally, it's not just animal fats that are saturated - there are saturated vegetable fats, too. Fats can be saturated (butter, palm oil, coconut oil...), monounsaturated (olive oil) or polyunsaturated (canola oil).

PowerManDL
06-30-2005, 07:20 PM
I don't ever think too much about what I eat post workout as long as it has a lot of protein and calories.

Of course I do that pre-workout too.