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View Full Version : Thinking Seriously About Westside



jack_of_all
06-30-2005, 09:10 AM
i know alot of people here have had great sucess with the program. as i have come to now myself though im not sure it would work for me as one of its principles is changing up the exercises almost constantly, i feel like i have to be the same for a few weeks until i get into a 'groove' then im able to increase my lifts and poundages. well i wont be able to do that if i go on westside, but then again, im not sure this is as much of a problem as i once did, other factors could have been at play when i was always screwing with my routine and thats why i saw no gains while changing exercises around.

i have no special equipment like t-bars or a place to do reverse hypers or any of that stuff. ive got no box to squat on either and for some reason im pretty adament about not doing box squats, i guess if i have to i have to, but i really dont want to since i dont think i have the parental support for me to be allowed to do something as weird as making a box to sit on while i squat. ive got all the weights i need (bbs and dbs), i have a power rack, i have a bench, and i have a pulldown thing. will this be ok? i would assume so but then again i dont know much about westside.


westside has an amazing reputation and after the summer is over id really love to give it a shot, for now im sticking with what i have but i am giving serious thought to beggining it in a couple months.

drew
06-30-2005, 09:22 AM
The equipment you have is a great start. I can not stress enough the importance of box squats. A lot of things can be taken out and substituted for, but box squats are like gold. Do them on a milk crate or a stack of 45 plates if you have to. Find a way.

Read whatever you can before starting and plan out at least your first 4 weeks.

PowerManDL
06-30-2005, 09:33 AM
i know alot of people here have had great sucess with the program. as i have come to now myself though im not sure it would work for me as one of its principles is changing up the exercises almost constantly, i feel like i have to be the same for a few weeks until i get into a 'groove' then im able to increase my lifts and poundages. well i wont be able to do that if i go on westside, but then again, im not sure this is as much of a problem as i once did, other factors could have been at play when i was always screwing with my routine and thats why i saw no gains while changing exercises around.

Then why do it? It's not set in stone. This is just a template, not something absolute.

A lot of beginning to intermediate (meaning any non-elite) lifters do something like this on ME days:

Week 1 - 5RM
Week 2 - 3RM
Week 3 - 1RM
Week 4 - rep work to unload

Then switch and repeat.


i have no special equipment like t-bars or a place to do reverse hypers or any of that stuff. ive got no box to squat on either and for some reason im pretty adament about not doing box squats, i guess if i have to i have to, but i really dont want to since i dont think i have the parental support for me to be allowed to do something as weird as making a box to sit on while i squat. ive got all the weights i need (bbs and dbs), i have a power rack, i have a bench, and i have a pulldown thing. will this be ok? i would assume so but then again i dont know much about westside.

Again, make do with what you have. Box squats aren't *absolutely* necessary in WS but I will tell you right off the bat that they are one of the best exercises you can do for the posterior chain, and avoiding them "just cause" is not the best idea.

That said it's very possible to get by without them. You'll just have to be more judicious with your exercise choices. The only 100% critical equipment for doing a PL routine is the rack, bench, barbell and weights. As long as you have those essentials you can get stronger.

Darracq
06-30-2005, 12:55 PM
Make sure to do more more off the chest than they recomend. I did it like they say and my board work got stronger but i got nothing off the chest.

FREAKZILLA
06-30-2005, 09:53 PM
I don't want to sound stupid but where is a great source to learn about WS training?

Sensei
06-30-2005, 10:51 PM
Check out the articles at http://elitefts.com/

Here are some of them (I would start w. "Bustin' Ass 101"):

The Periodization Bible Part II
http://www.testosterone.net/html/133per.html

The Eight Keys Part I (and the successive installments as well)
http://www.testosterone.net/html/133per.html

Nine Week Basic Training Program
http://elitefts.com/documents/9week-training-program.htm

Bustin' Ass 101: Don't Think You're a Beginner? You Could Be Wrong!
http://www.t-nation.com/findArticle.do;jsessionid=4ED85B19CE9A221F948A3D0BBA6E5F3B.ba08?article=288ba2


I wrote this:
Westside Made Easy
http://johnnymnemonic.proboards44.com/index.cgi?board=Articles&action=display&thread=1117919547

PowerManDL
07-01-2005, 01:00 AM
I always hate referencing those articles because it never fails that some dip**** will latch on to the sample programs as if that's the be-all of the template. Because people can't think.

So you end up with a whole grip of *******s that, instead of actually reading what Louie, Dave, Jim, et al, have to say on the matter, grab on to a sample program as if it *is* the Westside "routine".

The whole point of the template is simple. Find your weaknesses and fix them. It's as simple as that. The rest of it is merely a matter of assigning days to that, and it just so happens that 2 upper body days and 1-2 lower body days works out best to do that. The rest beyond that is 100% flexible. Westside is little more than a collection of guidelines besides that basic point, but people seem completely oblivious to this fact.

drew
07-01-2005, 06:38 AM
The whole point of the template is simple. Find your weaknesses and fix them. It's as simple as that.
:withstupi

If you REALLY want to know how true this is, go into the Q&A section at elitefts and look at the different training logs.

jack_of_all
07-01-2005, 08:06 AM
ok, so i should emphasize weaknesses.

in dls im weakest trying to break the bar off the floor, should i do partial dls with just the lower half of the ROM or something else? what should i do for benching if i have the most trouble getting the bar off my chest on benching but im fine on the lock out?

drew
07-01-2005, 08:11 AM
There are tons of things you can do. In general for DLs, work your hamstrings hard.

There is a lot of information about training weaknesses. Read elitefts.com, read deepsquatter.com

It has to be a commitment, and that means you absolutely have to put in your work researching. There are no simple answers.

PowerManDL
07-01-2005, 11:26 AM
in dls im weakest trying to break the bar off the floor, should i do partial dls with just the lower half of the ROM or something else?

Pulls from a deficit (standing on a box or plates), band pulls, reverse band pulls, pull sumo if you're normally conventional and vice versa, clean pulls, snatch-grip pulls, RDLs, box squats....the list goes on.


what should i do for benching if i have the most trouble getting the bar off my chest on benching but im fine on the lock out?

This is every raw bencher's weak point. And really all you can do is things to work on low-end strength, ability to reverse the bar, and ability to accelerate from the start.

DB pressing, low boards, paused benching, speed benching w/ bands or chains, and rack presses from a low position are all good options. As above, there's a lot of ways to work on this.

The trick, again, is to find your specific weaknesses. I've been using some variant of this routine for the better part of 5 years now, and to this day I'm still not only learning what exercises best suit me, but having to adapt that as my weak points change.

jack_of_all
07-01-2005, 11:32 AM
thanks for all the responses and reccomendations everyone, i guess ive got lots of research ahead of me :D so thanks for directing me to where i can find some of it.

Paul Stagg
07-01-2005, 06:03 PM
When it comes to this, one of the best places to do research is in the gym.

That's where you find out what your weaknesses are, and that's where you find out what fixes them.


My suggestion - start out with the 9 week beginner program. You are probably at a point right now where everything is your weakness, so doing something basic that's structured will halp you learn how to structure your training, learn some of the lifts, and figure out what specific issues you have. Plus you'll get stronger.