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mickyjune26
07-11-2005, 10:03 AM
Skip to the bottom to read the most updated absorption tips.
I know there are great posts on when to eat. I wanted to find the basic foundation of nutrition timing See the last post in this thread for the summary.

Can you please read and confirm these are true?

Protein - around 45 min
Dairy slower, whey faster

Carbs -
Hi GI, especially Dextrose - faster because of insulin spike

Low GI - slower
Brown Rice and oatmeal 90-120 minutes

Take protein with HI GI carbs to speed absorption rate

Anyone know of a tabl

mickyjune26
07-11-2005, 10:15 AM
Update -
Whey Protein - around 45 min
Egg Protein - ?
Dairy Protein - around 7 hours (Dairy contains casein which forms a clot in the stomach and slows the digestion process)

Carbs -
Hi GI - - faster because of insulin spike
Dextrose (corn sugar) - ?
Wheat Bread - ?
Low GI - slower
Brown Rice - 90-120 minutes
oatmeal 90-120 minutes

Note: Take protein and creatine with HI GI carbs to speed absorption rate due to the insulin spike

TylerDurden
07-11-2005, 12:22 PM
It all depends when, and what you eat them with. It also depends on the person and their GI function. Not to mention how much you consume at the time. Enzyme activation. How well you chew your food. These variables are the reason a table cannot be created.

mickyjune26
07-11-2005, 02:37 PM
Where do you learn about the variables? How do you know when to eat the various nutrients?

Thanks for your feedback, and I'll do some research myself when I get time. ; )

bradley
07-11-2005, 07:16 PM
Protein - around 45 min
Dairy slower, whey faster

You are correct but there are other factors that would come into play that would affect the rate of digestion. For example if you still have food in your gut, whey would obviously digest slower than if you had an empty stomach. As another member mentioned, the mastication of the food in question would determine digestion time. If you chew your food thoroughly there will be less digestion that takes place in the stomach.



Carbs -
Hi GI, especially Dextrose - faster because of insulin spike


Well dextrose requires no digestion, since it is a monosaccharide, but you should keep in mind the factors that I mentioned above.



Low GI - slower
Brown Rice and oatmeal 90-120 minutes


Take protein with HI GI carbs to speed absorption rate


Taking protein and carbs together are advantageous for a few reasons, since this will keep protein for being used as energy (protein sparing), and the insulin that is released will help "drive" nutrients into muscle cells.

All in all it is not really important, since calorie balance will be the determining factor as to whether you gain/lose weight.

mickyjune26
07-11-2005, 08:43 PM
Thanks all contributors!!!! :thumbup:
Revised List - Still learning a lot about nutrition - looking for links on absorption rates:

Proteins
Whey Protein - at least 45 min
Egg Protein - ?
Dairy Protein - Continuously for 7 hours (Dairy contains casein which forms a clot in the stomach and slows the digestion process)

Carbs
Hi GI foods - faster because of insulin spike
Dextrose (corn sugar) - No digestion. Instant absorption, assuming there is no food in stomach.
Wheat Bread - ?
Low GI - slower
Brown Rice - At least 90-120 minutes
oatmeal - At least 90-120 minutes

Basic nutrition concepts:: Take protein and creatine with HI GI carbs to speed absorption rate due to the insulin spike. This also prevents protein from being used as fuel (protein sparing).
Food in your stomach will slow your absorption rate down by ___ minutes.
Chewing your food well will help lessen digestion rate (good news for oatmeal smoothies!)

Summary:
Calorie balance determines if you gain or lose weight:
- If getting fatter, eat less.
- If losing weight, eat more.

TylerDurden
07-13-2005, 12:59 PM
If you want to understand digestion rates and of carbohydrates, amino acids, vitamins, minerals, and trace elements; you probably want to take a class in biochemistry.

SpecialK
07-13-2005, 01:06 PM
I think there are far too many variables involved for you to reduce things down to a simple list like that.

mickyjune26
07-13-2005, 01:23 PM
I completely understand and respect your point, but for me, I need to start somewhere. Even if it is a list of generalizations, I feel it's better than nothing.

Before having this list, I didn't know any of these facts. Thanks for your feedback, and if you have any modifications, I'll gladly include them...especially if something is wrong.

Again, thanks everyone who has contributed thus far.