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PhilsterT
07-16-2005, 09:51 AM
A nutriontionalist recently told me that the cut and bulk were extremly bad for your kidneys because it's hard on your body. She also said that dieting was extremly bad--it isn't healthy, it's a cosmetic thing because you don't get enough nutrients in your body and then your kidneys can't hold any water. How true is this statement? If you think about it, you can't really pull up that many old bodybuilders or powerlifters. How many of these guys live longer? It seems like it's advertised as a fitness thing, but it might just be temporarily. I guess a fair amount of people have died when lifting for various reasons.

ryuage
07-16-2005, 09:54 AM
dont cut or bulk then problem solved dont diet dont do anything and live a nice sedetary life.

MM
07-16-2005, 10:01 AM
She also said that dieting was extremly bad--it isn't healthy, it's a cosmetic thing because you don't get enough nutrients in your body and then your kidneys can't hold any water.

I wonder if she's ever heard of a multivitamin and increased water intake?

Holto
07-16-2005, 10:03 AM
It seems like the better your cert the less you know

The BS that spews from the mouth's of nutritionists is only topped by the garbage propagated by dieticians

tholian8
07-16-2005, 10:16 AM
How true is this statement?

It's mostly bull****.

Dieting is stressful on the body but so are a lot of other things.

It is true that if you are in negative calorie balance that you are not taking in enough nutrients for your current bodyweight. Therefore, most intelligent dieters take a good multivitamin at the very least. Some types of diets (PSMF, CKD etc) have to be supplemented a little more vigorously--but in any case, if your kidneys are in good shape when you start out then you are not going to kill them unless you do something truly, colossally stupid.

Not that this proves anything about age, but I saw a 74 y.o. guy do deadlifts for roughly 400 lbs the other day. He doesn't look like he's going anytime soon. :) I'm sure there are plenty of old BB's and PL's around.

PhilsterT
07-16-2005, 10:16 AM
This all may be well, but then how come you don't see many older weightlifters anymore? (Sorry, just trying to play devil advocates.) Has weightlifting helped prolong people's life in any way?

* * *

Haha, answered my question just after I posetd it.

fixationdarknes
07-16-2005, 10:25 AM
Hm...well, I can think of one way that weightlifting can prolong your life. As we deadlift and squat, and build strong backs, there's gonna come a time in our life when we might've almost hurt our backs or something but since we have strengthened cores, we're less likely to get injured than the old man who sits at his TV all day.

Max-Mex
07-16-2005, 10:28 AM
A nutriontionalist recently told me that the cut and bulk were extremly bad for your kidneys because it's hard on your body. She also said that dieting was extremly bad--it isn't healthy, it's a cosmetic thing because you don't get enough nutrients in your body and then your kidneys can't hold any water. How true is this statement? If you think about it, you can't really pull up that many old bodybuilders or powerlifters. How many of these guys live longer? It seems like it's advertised as a fitness thing, but it might just be temporarily. I guess a fair amount of people have died when lifting for various reasons.

I think this applies to people who do not do ANY physical activity. Also, I've read that this applies to people who do fad diets, lose a lot of weight, then fail on their diets, only to gain the weight (more sometimes) back.

Shao-LiN
07-16-2005, 11:17 AM
This all may be well, but then how come you don't see many older weightlifters anymore? (Sorry, just trying to play devil advocates.) Has weightlifting helped prolong people's life in any way?

* * *

Haha, answered my question just after I posetd it.

Does it help prolong your life? Who knows. If you can come up with a way to predetermine when you're actually going to die, then you'll be a rich man.

Is it a healthier lifestyle than sitting on your butt and doing nothing? I'd say yes.

bradley
07-16-2005, 03:30 PM
A nutriontionalist recently told me that the cut and bulk were extremly bad for your kidneys because it's hard on your body. She also said that dieting was extremly bad--it isn't healthy, it's a cosmetic thing because you don't get enough nutrients in your body and then your kidneys can't hold any water. How true is this statement? If you think about it, you can't really pull up that many old bodybuilders or powerlifters. How many of these guys live longer? It seems like it's advertised as a fitness thing, but it might just be temporarily. I guess a fair amount of people have died when lifting for various reasons.

I find the comment made by your nutritionist laughable at best. Calorie restriction has been shown to actually prolong lifespan in mammals, and I will be happy to dig the studies up if you like.

Unless you have a predisposed renal condition, the bulking and cutting cycle will not have any effect on your kidneys. This follows the same line of thinking that states too much protein is bad for you.

The reason that you do not see many older professional powerlifters or bodybuilders is because of the fact that they use AAS, which would have a detrimental effect on your health. Eat clean and lift hard and you will be fine. Next time you see your "nutritionist" ask her to provide you with some information that backs up her claim, or ask her to post on WBB with some relevant information. :ninja:

PhilsterT
07-16-2005, 04:43 PM
The person was referring to not getting enough nutrients, which I can see hard to do on a cut, but nutrient supplements would fix that.


I think this applies to people who do not do ANY physical activity. Also, I've read that this applies to people who do fad diets, lose a lot of weight, then fail on their diets, only to gain the weight (more sometimes) back.

Yep, sorry that I didn't make that clear; forgot about that.

spanky33
07-16-2005, 04:45 PM
it's been established that caloric restriction prolongs life in mammals. this is documented in many studies.

PhilsterT
07-16-2005, 06:09 PM
To what extent and under what conditions? Because that's obviously not true if you go too far below (i.e. death).

bradley
07-17-2005, 06:34 AM
To what extent and under what conditions? Because that's obviously not true if you go too far below (i.e. death).

You are correct, but if you take anything to an extreme it will be detrimental to your health. If you are taking in protein, EFAs, and a multi-vitamin, then I don't see any problem. For a nutritionist to make such a blanket statement shows that she is not well informed, or she should have clarified her statement. I have listed some studies below that illustrate my point, and please let me know if I can clarify anything. :evillaugh

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=15711582&query_hl=1
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=12525670&query_hl=1
http://www.medmutual.com/global/webmd/WebMDArticle.aspx?id=97220&aType=Diet

Shao-LiN
07-17-2005, 07:50 AM
If you decide to go far enough to be a detriment to your health, I call it natural selection.

AzBboy
07-17-2005, 11:15 AM
was she a fat ass

fixationdarknes
07-17-2005, 11:54 AM
You are correct, but if you take anything to an extreme it will be detrimental to your health. If you are taking in protein, EFAs, and a multi-vitamin, then I don't see any problem. For a nutritionist to make such a blanket statement shows that she is not well informed, or she should have clarified her statement. I have listed some studies below that illustrate my point, and please let me know if I can clarify anything. :evillaugh

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=15711582&query_hl=1
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=12525670&query_hl=1
http://www.medmutual.com/global/webmd/WebMDArticle.aspx?id=97220&aType=Diet

Those are interesting studies. But I couldn't imagine eating a mere 1200 calories a day. I'd be as skinny as a french fry.

PhilsterT
07-17-2005, 12:08 PM
Thanks for the links, they really help out. I think I will take a vitamin supplement every other day during my cut (Centrium D ones). This should solve the problem.

Jasonl
07-17-2005, 12:22 PM
I find the comment made by your nutritionist laughable at best. Calorie restriction has been shown to actually prolong lifespan in mammals, and I will be happy to dig the studies up if you like.

Unless you have a predisposed renal condition, the bulking and cutting cycle will not have any effect on your kidneys. This follows the same line of thinking that states too much protein is bad for you.

The reason that you do not see many older professional powerlifters or bodybuilders is because of the fact that they use AAS, which would have a detrimental effect on your health. Eat clean and lift hard and you will be fine. Next time you see your "nutritionist" ask her to provide you with some information that backs up her claim, or ask her to post on WBB with some relevant information. :ninja:Coudln't agree more... Also, don't forget to mention that many BBers and PLers aren't just "casual" (for lack of a better term) AAS users, many of them probably use more drugs for more years than most of the AAS using memberes of this board combined.

So bulk and cut away. :)

Patz
07-17-2005, 12:32 PM
Thanks for the links, they really help out. I think I will take a vitamin supplement every other day during my cut (Centrium D ones). This should solve the problem.

lol..how about taking one EVERY day, like they're intended?

SW
07-17-2005, 12:51 PM
I find the comment made by your nutritionist laughable at best.

:withstupi I'm in no mood for misinformation.

hoser813
07-17-2005, 04:10 PM
Dieting is bad for you?? WTF is she smoking? A "diet" is your eating trends. A diet can be anything from McDonald's every day to eating a piece of cardboard, its just the way you eat. The majority of people on here's diet consists of eating healthy food. If she thinks that's bad for you, then she should try eating her foot and quit spewing out the bull****.

luke77
07-19-2005, 04:30 AM
I think that the point the nutritionist was making is that it is not healthy to constantly gain weight then lose it - essentially yo-yo dieting. She does have a point, because it does put some additional stress on the body which would prefer some sort of "equilibrium"...however, imo the positive health effects of lifting outweigh any negatives that may be attributed to cutting/bulking.

Unholy
07-19-2005, 07:36 AM
I think that "equilibrium" is more often than not, UNHEALTHY. More so than dieting and bulking/cutting cycles are far from yoyo dieting.

2BBuilt
07-21-2005, 03:43 PM
was she a fat ass

lmao :)

sCaRz*Of*PaiN
07-24-2005, 05:43 PM
It depends on how you define "diet". If your diet consists of healthy foods spread throughout the day with plenty of water intake while taking multivitamins...that isn't going to be negative on your health.

You shouldn't listen to that nutritionist anymore as the information she gave you was rather vague. She needs to learn how to speak to people because her theories are asinine and she left many holes and questions to be asked when she made that vague statement.

southside
07-24-2005, 06:16 PM
id rather live a life of looking good and feeling good and have as horter life then live one without activity and have a long life.

sCaRz*Of*PaiN
07-24-2005, 06:26 PM
You can look good, feel good and live a long life.