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Mr. ?
08-19-2005, 12:10 PM
Could someone please enlighten me on this. Here is a portion taken from an article I was reading on Hydrogenated Oils and Trans Fats:

"...If you see the words "hydrogenated" or "partially hydrogenated oil" on the label, the product contains trans fat."

Later in the same article is said this:

"If it doesn't say "Trans Fat 0g", don't buy it! There are NO safe levels of trans fats."

Makes sense to me. If the ingredients say it has hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated oil it has a level of Trans Fat. So why do some nutritional labels I have seen have hydrogenated oils in the ingredients but at the same time say 'Trans Fat 0g'? :confused:

Anthony
08-19-2005, 12:16 PM
They round down.

Canadian Crippler
08-19-2005, 12:16 PM
<0.5g can be listed as "0" I believe.

Canadian Crippler
08-19-2005, 12:16 PM
They round down.Beat me to it :(

Anthony
08-19-2005, 12:19 PM
I'm so fly.

ShockBoxer
08-19-2005, 12:30 PM
It's hard to escape them completely. Most meat you get when eating out (not just at fast food places) has some trans-fat content. For that matter doesn't most cooked meat?

Avoiding fries when eating out is a must if you're watching trans-fat. Anything run through a deep fryer doesn't emerge unscathed...

malkore
08-19-2005, 12:59 PM
No, meat doesn't naturally contain trans fat. Trans fat occurs during the hydrogenation process. So if something has no hydrogenated oil, it won't contain trans fat.

But you're right, that the marinades they use in restaurants may indeed contain some hydrogenated oil.

I've decided trans fats are the devil, and for that reason if I must put butter on something, I use real butter, not margarine, not even olive oil spread. considering a half pat is more than enough for my taste, and my diet is so low in fat right now, I don't sweat the saturated fat. Its just too infrequent to lose sleep over.

PhilsterT
08-19-2005, 01:32 PM
What happens with levels of trans fat?

ShockBoxer
08-19-2005, 01:49 PM
Nothing major I hope... I knocked back 30 grams or more a week for years. :micro:



From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

A trans fatty acid (commonly shortened to trans fat) is an unsaturated fatty acid whose molecules contain trans double bonds between carbon atoms, which makes the molecules less kinked compared to those of 'cis fat'. Research suggests a correlation between diets high in trans fats and diseases like atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. The National Academy of Sciences recommended in 2002 that dietary intake of trans fatty acids be minimized.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trans-fat

Nosaj
08-19-2005, 02:30 PM
What effects do trans fats have on body building specifically? Anyone have a link to a good essential/trans fat knowledge information source?

Thanks.

ReelBigFish
08-19-2005, 02:30 PM
No, meat doesn't naturally contain trans fat. Trans fat occurs during the hydrogenation process. So if something has no hydrogenated oil, it won't contain trans fat.

But you're right, that the marinades they use in restaurants may indeed contain some hydrogenated oil.

I've decided trans fats are the devil, and for that reason if I must put butter on something, I use real butter, not margarine, not even olive oil spread. considering a half pat is more than enough for my taste, and my diet is so low in fat right now, I don't sweat the saturated fat. Its just too infrequent to lose sleep over.

actually you're kinda wrong there. Some meats, and dairy products, naturally contain small amounts of trans fats.
http://www.fda.gov/fdac/features/2003/503_fats.html

but it's nothing to sweat.

Built
08-19-2005, 02:49 PM
There ARE naturally occurring trans fats that are good for you: CLA for example:

http://www.sciencenews.org/articles/20010303/bob9.asp

malkore
08-19-2005, 03:14 PM
so it looks like naturally occuring trans fats in meats/dairy fall under .4g per serving, since they didn't list it in their chart.
as for the CLA article, interesting reading. Sounds like it's only the trans fats from hyrdogenated oils that we need to worry about. The natural trace amounts, or CLA supps aren't harmful, and in fact may be quite beneficial.

Shao-LiN
08-19-2005, 07:23 PM
CLA is only really beneficial in large doses, which makes it not very economical.

waynis
08-20-2005, 10:54 AM
the naturally occuring trans fats that are found in meats and such aren't anything to be worried about. It's the man made trans fats that are added to foods. I noticed on the news in the past week new york state is trying to eliminate the use of trans fats in restaurants. Sounds crazy.. who knows if it will happen.

ShockBoxer
08-21-2005, 07:03 AM
Won't happen. They'd have to bake their fries, just like people do at home (McCain brand and such that advertise no-trans). Restaurants need fries cooked a lot faster than that... and that means deep frier and that means trans-fat.

Plus, KFC would be shut down. Could you imagine New York without deep fried food?

largelegsbuthot
08-21-2005, 07:31 AM
Won't happen. They'd have to bake their fries, just like people do at home (McCain brand and such that advertise no-trans). Restaurants need fries cooked a lot faster than that... and that means deep frier and that means trans-fat.

Plus, KFC would be shut down. Could you imagine New York without deep fried food?
I second that, you can't tell people what to eat or what not to eat, especially when your talking about the peoples' beloved fast food industry.
Trans fats will only kill you if taken in large regular quantities...
I'll believe it when they outlaw cigarettes.

Holto
08-21-2005, 12:20 PM
The McDonalds in Europe use deep fryers and their fries are trans free.

This is all because Europeans are really knowledgable about health and they protested.

If your oil is trans free what you cook is trans free.

Hydrogenation occurs at 1400 degrees.

Holto
08-21-2005, 12:22 PM
McCain brand and such that advertise no-trans

The McCain fries that are advertised as trans-free are still fried.

They are fried in non-hydrogenated oil.

ShockBoxer
08-21-2005, 01:38 PM
Fair enough. Didn't know it was that high a temp for hydrogenization.

Still, there has to be some sort of monetary reason restaurant chains resist going trans free. How could non-hydrogenized oil be more expensive than hydrogenized, though?

TheGimp
08-21-2005, 02:22 PM
The frying process doesn't hydrogenate the fat.

The reason hydrogenated fat is often used in deep fat fryers is because it is more stable and more suited to being reused.

ShockBoxer
08-21-2005, 08:11 PM
And thus more cost efficient. Knew it had to be something that simple. Government doesn't want to see you live to retirement anyways, it seems. :)

malkore
08-22-2005, 10:29 AM
McDonalds stopped using trans fat in its fryers...remember the controversy over their statements about making their french fries 'healthier' by using 'healthier' oil.

Fried french fries ain't healthy, so they can't be made healthier. But it would have been bad marketing to say "now our fries are less deadly!"

ShockBoxer
08-22-2005, 10:48 AM
Check McDonald's website for the nutritional guide... McD fries are still 1.5 grams of trans for a medium.

Better than Wendy's 6...

Holto
08-22-2005, 12:40 PM
The main reason trans fats are used is crispness.

That fri that was cooked 20 minutes ago remains crisp.

Those Doritos's manufactured 6 months ago etc...