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jazer80
09-05-2005, 06:58 PM
wondering where to get a harness / strap type thing to attach to myself so i can drag stuff. saw something about dragging a tire in anthony's journal that sounded cool.

i've been off the boards and out of the gym for a month or two now (working like 60 hrs/ week...), and am beginning again today. i'm down to 154 right now, and it's depressing..

AJ Roberts
09-05-2005, 09:03 PM
elitefts.com sells them

MixmasterNash
09-05-2005, 09:11 PM
There is no need for special equipment to get fit. Try running.

MixmasterNash
09-05-2005, 09:44 PM
Do you understand the point of GPP? Do you want to pull a sled to pull a sled, or do you want to improve your work capacity? Have you thought about all of the cheaper, easier alternatives to sled pulling?

Meat_Head
09-05-2005, 10:02 PM
Do you understand the point of GPP? Do you want to pull a sled to pull a sled, or do you want to improve your work capacity? Have you thought about all of the cheaper, easier alternatives to sled pulling?

Cheaper, but without a much greater overload capacity(without the injury risks of something like running) + a sled workout takes much less time than running would, depending on the type of running of course.

jazer80
09-05-2005, 10:12 PM
Cheaper but with a much greater overload capacity(without the injury risks of something like running) + a sled workout takes much less time than running would, depending on the type of running of course.
exactly. my favorite alternative at this point is hill sprints, and i hate hill sprints

jazer80
09-05-2005, 10:13 PM
by the way, what does gpp mean? i've seen it like 5 times today and don't ever remember seeing that before

Anthony
09-06-2005, 05:24 AM
General Physical Preparedness. It's just a fancy way to describe what we did as kids ... run around playing cops and robbers, bike for hours, play baseball, frisbee, go swimming .... all before lunch. Try doing that now and you'll get your ass kicked (at least I would). So we use "gpp" exercises to gradually build up our work capacity. You don't HAVE to pull a sled, but it's one of the best gpp exercises I've done. Hell, shoveling snow is considered gpp. Just use your imagination.

As for the original question, you don't need a harness, although they would be ideal. Just tie the rope around your waist or wear a weight belt and tie the rope around that.

jazer80
09-06-2005, 08:36 AM
so you want to be anchored at the waist ideally then?

i know one powerlifter, who i have never even lifted with, and have never actually been around this stuff. i wanted some kind of 'gpp' type activity, as i'm only doing boxing right now, and wanted more varietey.

so your suggestion would be just get a rope, a weight belt, and a tire or somethign to drag? this may be a stupid question, but can someone my size get a car in neutral rolling?

Anthony
09-06-2005, 08:46 AM
Where you anchor the rope will depend on what's comfortable to you. See how it feels.

If you are going to drag a tire, get some boards to put inside and pile on some sandbags. The tire won't be heavy enough - assuming you're using a normal car tire.

As for pushing the car ... give it a shot!!

jazer80
09-06-2005, 11:34 AM
when you say give it a shot, do you mean that it could work, or are you saying that sarcastically? i really can't determine if it's feasible or not... i'm pretty sure i can get my car rolling when in neutral by pushing it, but don't want to figure out a way of hjooking **** up so i can drag it if it's gonna be a wastee of time. anyone ever try that before? i figure it would be cool since 1)i wouldn't have to carry a tire with me to a parking lot, which means i can stop whenever i want and do this, and 2)i can crank my stereo up and leave my keys in the ignition, since i'll only be a few feet from the car.

ya i read about your tire setup in your journal, if i don't try the car thing i'll go with the tire, it's just i have a small apartment, and don't want a tire just chilling in my living room.... and don't have room in my car to keep it, so if pulling my car on a flat surface is feasible it will be way more convenient

Anthony
09-06-2005, 11:43 AM
I doubt you can pull the car via rope, but you should be able to push it around a flat parking lot. We push the jeep around once in awhile, and it sucks. :p

johnnytang24
09-06-2005, 11:59 AM
Getting a car moving isn't hard. Getting it to stop is the problem.

Thanks.

Sensei
09-06-2005, 12:10 PM
There is no need for special equipment to get fit. Try running.


I agree w. you Nash, but there is GPP and then there is GPP... Running is fine and it will raise your work capacity, but sled dragging would raise your work capacity and be hitting more muscle groups that you will be using for lifting.

A sled doesn't have to be expensive. It can be made pretty easily (you could just drag a plate(s) w. a rope if you wanted to) and it is a pretty versatile piece of equipment.

jazer80
09-06-2005, 12:35 PM
I doubt you can pull the car via rope, but you should be able to push it around a flat parking lot. We push the jeep around once in awhile, and it sucks. :p
i disagree.... i just went, and it ruled! i love it... i'm not even gonna bother trying with a harness, i just went to a parking lot, pulled my gym shoes out of the trunk, cranked the stereo and threw it in neutral. you push it until it gets going, then go to the other end and start over. so glad i tried this

Maki Riddington
09-06-2005, 04:20 PM
It's cheaper to pull a homemade sled than it is to run. All you need is a rope and a some weight. If you were to run, you'd want to invest in some quality running shoes. For pulling a sled all you need are some cheap cross trainers.

ryuage
09-06-2005, 05:06 PM
id still recommend some good running shoes, it could be all the difference when it comes to foot/knee pain

Maki Riddington
09-06-2005, 05:25 PM
In terms of ankle support, maybe. However cross trainers should do the job just fine. If you're talking about compressive forces, then I don't agree. Running shoes are meant to absorb the shock from running on the pavement and or long runs.

I figure most people pull a sled maybe no more then 100 meters before stopping, maybe a bit further however this only repeated several times a week, while most people run quite a bit more, much further and for a longer period of time.

Anyways, who cares. If you want to invest in running shoes go nuts. I'm simply saying that I don't think it's that big of a deal.

jazer80
09-06-2005, 09:41 PM
anyone know any other alternative exercises like this one? anything in general to add newness to my routine (besides farmer's walks, maybe something upper body oriented?)

MixmasterNash
09-06-2005, 09:59 PM
Overhead support walks, zercher walks, walking with a shouldered sandbag. Sand is way cheap.

Maki Riddington
09-06-2005, 10:20 PM
Sand bag training is really big right now or should I say it will be.

MixmasterNash
09-06-2005, 11:20 PM
I'd say sandbags are a gimmick, but for the fact that it's the cheapest weight you can get besides some rocks. Kettlebells and such are definately a gimmick because they're expensive.

Still, I'm going to buy a $100 olympic bar set because sandbags are a grip and leverage limited way to train.

Maki Riddington
09-06-2005, 11:26 PM
Sounds good.

Sensei
09-06-2005, 11:34 PM
Kettlebells and such are definately a gimmick because they're expensive.

Ever since I saw Anatoly Kharpaty's coach challenge him to hoist a kettlebell in training on a clip that was on tv during the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics, I've always wanted a kettlebell... Someday I will buy one just because of that.

jazer80
09-07-2005, 11:21 AM
I'd say sandbags are a gimmick, but for the fact that it's the cheapest weight you can get besides some rocks. Kettlebells and such are definately a gimmick because they're expensive.

Still, I'm going to buy a $100 olympic bar set because sandbags are a grip and leverage limited way to train.
ya you def still gotta have an olympic bar....

i laughed when i saw kettlebells, they're just oddly shaped overpriced dumbbells. not sure i understand what they do that dumbbells don't :(

so what do you do with a sandbag, just carry it around? throw it? what kind of bag do you use, i assume it needs to be crazy strong

ryuage
09-07-2005, 11:38 AM
while in Iraq I didnt look at filling 10,000 sandbags and walking back and forth/throwing them much fun as far as gpp was concerned :) I will say though it is a killer workout if you wanna try, I managed to shrink from 200 to 150 lbs while eating everything in sight.

bIgHwN86
09-07-2005, 12:37 PM
Upper Body GPP exercises that i know of are medicine ball passes/throws either for distance or time....sledghammer swings (get a tire and a sledgehammer and try to annihilate the hell out of that tire)...push ups...One arm presses...discus throws...shot put..sandbag presses/throws/tosses...boxing (punching bag)...and tons more, elitefts should have some more ideas too

Meat_Head
09-07-2005, 01:49 PM
I'd say sandbags are a gimmick, but for the fact that it's the cheapest weight you can get besides some rocks.

I hope you're kidding! They're a tried and tested method of gaining functional strength and likely alot of size with it. The fact that they're very dependent of grip and leverage alone makes them more useful for say a wrestler or football player. Try a 150lb sandbag clean and press someday... WAY different than a barbell.

Canadian Crippler
09-07-2005, 01:55 PM
General Physical Preparedness. It's just a fancy way to describe what we did as kids ... run around playing cops and robbers, bike for hours, play baseball, frisbee, go swimming .... all before lunch.^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

That's about it. Basically ANYTHING physical can be used as GPP when tweaked a certain way.

jazer80
09-07-2005, 02:32 PM
what do you use for a sandbag?

squat it all!
09-07-2005, 02:35 PM
what do you use for a sandbag?

a sandbag

Anthony
09-07-2005, 02:37 PM
what do you use for a sandbag?

Get some burlap bags from a feed store, dump sand into a plastic bag (double/triple wrap), wrap this in the burlap, duct tape the **** out of it, and voila ... perfect sandbag.

Meat_Head
09-07-2005, 02:50 PM
Also try buying a duffel bag from an army surplus store and filling it with sand.

MixmasterNash
09-07-2005, 02:50 PM
I hope you're kidding! They're a tried and tested method of gaining functional strength and likely alot of size with it. The fact that they're very dependent of grip and leverage alone makes them more useful for say a wrestler or football player. Try a 150lb sandbag clean and press someday... WAY different than a barbell.

I mean a gimmick in the sense that they're becoming fashionable and popular.

If you were familiar with past sandbag discussions here, you'd know that I am the happy user of a number of heavy sandbags.

Guido
09-07-2005, 02:56 PM
The best GPP I ever did was working on a railroad one summer, laying track manually. Carrying 200+ lb ties, digging rocks out from under rails, lifting the rails, inserting the ties, driving in the spikes with a BIG sledgehammer, then tamping down the ties and shoveling more rocks in between. You'll be dripping in sweat and in pain for days after just 30 minutes of doing that! Somehow I lived through doing it for 8-10 hours a day.

jazer80
09-07-2005, 06:51 PM
Also try buying a duffel bag from an army surplus store and filling it with sand.
KILLER IDEA

i went down there, and they had duffel bags and had bags meant for sand. they had this strong / ultra wide duct tape too, and free sand for me in the back!

anyways i made a ~40lbs bag with a big tail for gripping. worked real well, glad i asked for more ideas.

so now i've spent ~ 12$, and have two cool new exercises...

Meat_Head
09-07-2005, 07:59 PM
KILLER IDEA

i went down there, and they had duffel bags and had bags meant for sand. they had this strong / ultra wide duct tape too, and free sand for me in the back!

anyways i made a ~40lbs bag with a big tail for gripping. worked real well, glad i asked for more ideas.

so now i've spent ~ 12$, and have two cool new exercises...

There's a wealth of sandbag exercises you can do. If you know them, clean and press & snatches. Deadlifts are great for grip strength, or light weight high rep deadlifts for GPP. Walk around with a sandbag on your shoulder or pressed overhead. Bearhug the sandbag, lift it off the ground, walk with it. Throw the sandbag for distance or height(don't break it though). Get 2 sandbags, grip the sides and do farmer's walks or hold them under your arms, walk with them. Bent over rows and upright rows are good. Grip the sides of the sandbag and do hammer curls - its awesome for forearm strength and size. Those are the best sandbag exercises I've tried.

Behemoth
09-07-2005, 08:59 PM
Get a construction job and hump shingles and plywood.

jazer80
09-08-2005, 06:31 PM
There's a wealth of sandbag exercises you can do. If you know them, clean and press & snatches. Deadlifts are great for grip strength, or light weight high rep deadlifts for GPP. Walk around with a sandbag on your shoulder or pressed overhead. Bearhug the sandbag, lift it off the ground, walk with it. Throw the sandbag for distance or height(don't break it though). Get 2 sandbags, grip the sides and do farmer's walks or hold them under your arms, walk with them. Bent over rows and upright rows are good. Grip the sides of the sandbag and do hammer curls - its awesome for forearm strength and size. Those are the best sandbag exercises I've tried.
ya that's basically what i've been doing. the way i made mine makes it look like a bomb kind of, like a big round part with the sand, and a giant tail coming from it, which is like a foot long and thicker than an olympic bar, so i can grab it by that, which makes it like a handle for rows/hammer curls/etc. The thing is so much fun, i just went into a parking lot and cranked up the stereo and played with it for a while. great workout