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View Full Version : Nuts dont lead to weight gain???



JesseM
09-07-2005, 03:38 PM
I read this months issue of a certain magazine, and the article claims studies were performed where subjects added up to 400 calories of nuts (walnuts specifically) to their diets with no increase in bodyweight. Now I dont know much about this magazine other than hearing people on here slamming it. Anyone ever here of these studies before, or know where I could read about these studies. The article is extremely vague and offers no possible explanations to how walnut or almond calories don't add weight. The whole thing sounds like bs to me.

getfit
09-07-2005, 04:21 PM
although nuts are high in fat, the fat is mostly unsaturated fat which has has a beneficial effect on health

the protein in nuts is also high in arginine!

walnuts are high ih alpha-linolenic acid(n-3 or omega)

SpecialK
09-07-2005, 04:39 PM
If after consuming the 400 extra calories from the nuts they were still not over their own maintenance level of cals, then they will not gain weight.

Canadian Crippler
09-07-2005, 07:56 PM
The magazine comes out with a new issue every month. In each issue they need about a dozen new, unique articles. There are almost never a dozen new appealing topics to discuss each month. So they come up with bull**** like this to compensate.

Shao-LiN
09-07-2005, 08:00 PM
You can add 400 calories of bread to your diet and still not gain weight assuming that you are at or under maintenance. The article isn't saying that you can arbirtrarily add peanuts and the calories don't count.

sCaRz*Of*PaiN
09-07-2005, 11:17 PM
You can add 400 calories of bread to your diet and still not gain weight assuming that you are at or under maintenance. The article isn't saying that you can arbirtrarily add peanuts and the calories don't count.They like to leave out small bits of information like that to confuse people.

malkore
09-08-2005, 08:24 AM
They like to leave out small bits of information like that to confuse people.

Of course. If their readers get into too good of shape, they won't need to subscribe to that rag anymore ;)

JesseM
09-08-2005, 01:48 PM
You can add 400 calories of bread to your diet and still not gain weight assuming that you are at or under maintenance. The article isn't saying that you can arbirtrarily add peanuts and the calories don't count.

Maybe it's just me, but it seemed that the article was suggesting that nut calories will not add pounds. They said " added 400 calories to their subjects diets " When I read that I assume maintenance. What was the point of the article had it not been above maintenance?

ShockBoxer
09-08-2005, 01:52 PM
I use nuts to HIT maintenance (they're a great source of healthy fat). If they didn't count then I would be losing weight faster so my vote is they follow the same rules as everything else digestable on earth...

Nito
09-08-2005, 02:36 PM
Calories lead to weight gain. Therefore nuts count.

Bruise Brubaker
09-08-2005, 07:30 PM
Some food can alters the metabolism and thus contribute less to a net increase of the caloric surplus.

I don't know to which point it is true, but I read on few places calling the merits of coconut oil that when some farmers tried to fatten their animals with cheap coconut oil, it did the opposite. It is now known that the saturated fatty acids it contains are very quickly digested and can raise the metabolism (http://www.heall.com/body/healthupdates/food/coconutoil.html). Testimonials of people tend to show that it promotes weight loss.

Maybe walnuts have similar properties to coconuts but there are too many factors and we don't know much about the study. Maybe it just helped the studied people eat less of other things and thus maintain their weight.

Shao-LiN
09-08-2005, 08:27 PM
Maybe it's just me, but it seemed that the article was suggesting that nut calories will not add pounds. They said " added 400 calories to their subjects diets " When I read that I assume maintenance. What was the point of the article had it not been above maintenance?

You assumed maintenance. That doesn't mean that they were at it. Nuts don't have any special voodoo associated with it that make the calories you obtain from them not count. They are a relatively good source of calories (mostly a healthy source of fats as others have mentioned), but they still count.

Shao-LiN
09-08-2005, 08:30 PM
Some food can alters the metabolism and thus contribute less to a net increase of the caloric surplus.

I don't know to which point it is true, but I read on few places calling the merits of coconut oil that when some farmers tried to fatten their animals with cheap coconut oil, it did the opposite. It is now known that the saturated fatty acids it contains are very quickly digested and can raise the metabolism (http://www.heall.com/body/healthupdates/food/coconutoil.html). Testimonials of people tend to show that it promotes weight loss.

Maybe walnuts have similar properties to coconuts but there are too many factors and we don't know much about the study. Maybe it just helped the studied people eat less of other things and thus maintain their weight.

You do make a valid point. Coconut is a great source of Medium Chain Triglycerides which are metabolized differently. They can actually provide you with lots of energy (which proves useful on diets such as a CKD in which you limit carbs and raise fats). But, the calories which are obtained from coconut oil do still count. To my knowledge, nuts do not provide a similar type of metabolic response.

JesseM
09-09-2005, 05:32 AM
You assumed maintenance. That doesn't mean that they were at it. Nuts don't have any special voodoo associated with it that make the calories you obtain from them not count. They are a relatively good source of calories (mostly a healthy source of fats as others have mentioned), but they still count.


Shao-Lin, I know calories above maintenance leads to weight gain, calories below to weight loss. That wasnt why I posted here. In my original post I was asking if anyone has read "real" documented studies.

wrestlemaniac
09-11-2005, 01:38 PM
Coconut oil is a diaretic (which means it causes you to ****). You eat that stuff and most of the calories you put in one door will go out the other. It's like those anerexic idiots who take ex-lax to lose weight.

Shao-LiN
09-11-2005, 01:54 PM
Not really.

agentplaya1
09-14-2005, 07:50 PM
I read this months issue of a certain magazine, and the article claims studies were performed where subjects added up to 400 calories of nuts (walnuts specifically) to their diets with no increase in bodyweight. Now I dont know much about this magazine other than hearing people on here slamming it. Anyone ever here of these studies before, or know where I could read about these studies. The article is extremely vague and offers no possible explanations to how walnut or almond calories don't add weight. The whole thing sounds like bs to me.

What magazine was this article in, and did it cite from what journal this study was taken, or who did the study? Reading the original study itself would clear up a lot of issues.

JesseM
09-15-2005, 11:49 AM
M&f