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View Full Version : How to present the topic of Adderal to parents?



Kaiser
09-20-2005, 11:00 PM
Well, I'm 18 years old, and a freshman in college. All throughout highschool I never could concentrate very well, making it hard for me to sit down and get homework done or study for tests. So i basically didn't do either, the only thing that saved me is that I am fairly smart and I could make B's or C's on the tests in highschool.

Now that I am in college I realize that the system that I had will not really work for me, but I have never suggested the idea of me being ADD or anything of the sort to my parents. What I am afraid of is that they will just be like you don't have a problem, you're just like every other 18 year old. Which is true in some sense but at this point, 3 weeks into my first semester, I do not think I can do well in college without some sort of outside help.

So what I am hoping for from this post is that maybe someone (parents, doctors, or really anyone) can help me gather some points and organize my thoughts to explain to my parents. If I approach the conversation without any thought to its organization or points my parents will most likely shoot down any ideas I have. Or even ideas to help me get focused.

Glaim
09-21-2005, 12:03 AM
If you can organize your thoughts on a collective, rational manner, wouldn't this shoot down the notion to your parents that you need adderall? :)

Built
09-21-2005, 12:12 AM
I have ADD.

And degrees in Math and Operations Reasearch.

What's your point, Glaim?

Allie
09-21-2005, 07:58 AM
Well since ADHD has many extreme, just talk to them about your difficulties paying attention, that your mind doesn't stay focused in class or while you study. If you don't think you can talk to them and can't you just go to the campus health center since I'm going to assume you have student health insurance?

TwiloMike
09-21-2005, 08:21 AM
Can you see a shrink without your parents knowing? If you approach them with a doctor's evaulation that you havd ADD or something similar they may be less dismissive.

Gyno Rhino
09-21-2005, 08:44 AM
Try everything else BEFORE you mess with that stuff.

hoser813
09-21-2005, 11:58 AM
^^ yeah, I know some people that are really hooked on that stuff. I know that most people say its not addicting, but all drugs are addicting to an extent. If you can get on something less extreme to get you by then try it, but try to use drugs as a last resort.

Built
09-21-2005, 12:59 PM
I actually find epehedrine HCL with caffeine is a great sub for ritalin or dex which I have taken for ADD.

Kaiser
09-21-2005, 02:02 PM
Thank everyone for the replies. As of now I think I am just going to talk to the doctor on my own. Hopefully he can give me some sort of advice without going as far as taking Adderal or something else similar.

I will probably go see the doctor this weekend unless I am forced to leave because of Hurricane Rita :rolleyes: .

razorcut
09-21-2005, 04:03 PM
Thank everyone for the replies. As of now I think I am just going to talk to the doctor on my own.Good call. If it's disabling enough to impact your daily life, it's enough to at least see a physician. With all due respect to your parents, you're 18 now and it's ultimately you who would be under treatment....not them. See what the doc says.


.....all drugs are addicting to an extent.Not true.

biggimp
09-21-2005, 04:33 PM
Not true.

maybe not physically, but all drugs are potentially addictive at least on a psychological level. even pot.

biggimp
09-21-2005, 04:35 PM
I actually find epehedrine HCL with caffeine is a great sub for ritalin or dex which I have taken for ADD.


ok i used to hang out with people who would "dex" basically pop a bunch of a certain brand of cough medicene pills... i would always hear stories of corn stalks growing out of couches and people with no faces. you arent talking about this are you?

Jorge Sanchez
09-21-2005, 09:01 PM
I know a guy who wanted to get some ADD medication (I think it was dex actually), so he researched the symptoms and went to the doc and convinced him he had ADD and needed the drug, even though he didn't.

That's stupid if you ask me, but if you really want the drug it shouldn't be hard to get it. You could probably just ask for the prescription and they would give it to you.

Gyno Rhino
09-22-2005, 07:13 AM
Not true.


It is VERY VERY true.

Anything and everything can be MENTALLY addictive.

razorcut
09-22-2005, 09:48 AM
It is VERY VERY true.

Anything and everything can be MENTALLY addictive.Mentally, yes. Physiologically, no.

Gyno Rhino
09-22-2005, 10:06 AM
He didn't say physiologically, now did he?

He said "addicted". You can become addicted to pizza.

razorcut
09-22-2005, 10:40 AM
I don't think he said mentally, either.

Addicted to pizza? I guess you could tell yourself that to legitimize eating a supreme every night. But I've never seen anyone tempt death by going through pizza-withdrawal.

Gyno Rhino
09-22-2005, 04:28 PM
Apparently you've never met me.

Bruise Brubaker
09-22-2005, 09:54 PM
Gyno Rhino wins.

Gyno Rhino 1
razorcut 0

FINISH HIM!

Hell, you can be physically addicted to a pizza. The high carbs have an addicting effect. I won't even talk about the gluten intolerant people that can get an effect from it, because of some of the undigested peptides that have an opoid effect if they get a chance to enter the blood stream, such as in the presence of a leaky gut. Many autists get a relief from gluten free diets. Same goes for casein.

razorcut
09-23-2005, 08:30 AM
Hell, you can be physically addicted to a pizza. The high carbs have an addicting effect. I won't even talk about the gluten intolerant people that can get an effect from it, because of some of the undigested peptides that have an opoid effect if they get a chance to enter the blood stream, such as in the presence of a leaky gut. Many autists get a relief from gluten free diets. Same goes for casein.
Glad you weighed in. You must be withdrawing from pizza and not thinking clearly.

Show me the data on:
#1. The physical addiction of (and subsequent withdrawal from) pizza
(and)
#2. Undigested peptides having an opiod effect.

Here, I'll help you get started:

Regarding #1
NeuroImage (April 2004) published a nice article exploring this question of "food addiction". They found "the mere presence of food stimulated certain areas of the brain that are involved in reward and motivation. In particular, the scans revealed activity in the parietal cortex." Also interesting was activity detected in the right orbitofrontal cortex. "Previous studies have linked this brain region to compulsive behaviors and intense cravings in drug addicts."

What's interesting is this: Identical brain patterns were also detected in normal control patients devoid of any "addiction-like" complaints......showing this is the brain's normal response to hunger, rather than some unusual physiological response implying addiction.

Regarding #2
Neuropeptides essential for feeding control are present (in all individuals) in two neuron groups in the brain. None of these essential neuropeptides are associated with the opioid system. Pharmaceutical companies are targeting these groups for the development of drugs in treating obesity.

Thank you, thank you very much.

Bruise Brubaker
09-23-2005, 04:19 PM
Regarding #1
Here what I said was rather clumsy but I was thinking that high glycemic starch have an effect similar to sugar (and more precisely sucrose):
Sucrose addiction has been described in rat model. With a concentrated sucrose solution to drink an opioid dependence developed with 1) increased consumption of sucrose 2) abstinence symptoms with no sucrose and 3) anxiety with an opiate blocker. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=15962882&query_hl=8


Regarding #2:
There are many studies on gliadin (a peptide in gluten) and its opioid effect on pubmed.com...http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?CMD=search&DB=pubmed
"Our database contains currently 527 sequences of bioactive peptides with antihypertensive, opioid, immunomodulating and other activities."
From http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=10399353&query_hl=2

What the hell do neuropeptides have to do with all this?!? You clearly didn't understand what you quoted!


By the way, I don't eat pizza. Let's forget all this and agree that Gyno Rhino won, m'kay?

razorcut
09-23-2005, 05:57 PM
Regarding #1
Here what I said was rather clumsy......http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=15962882&query_hl=8
Yes it was. But to direct quote your cited source:
"Sucrose addiction in man has not been described in the scientific literature." Again, no reference whatsoever to an individual going through a physical withdrawal from food......which would certainly be expected in the case of a "physical/physiological addiction" to food.


Regarding #2:
What the hell do neuropeptides have to do with all this?!? You clearly didn't understand what you quoted!
Oh, but I think you're the confused soul. Neuropeptides have everything to do with this. They are the ultimate source of a person being hungry or not hungry. Basic priniciples, my friend.

ectx
09-23-2005, 06:51 PM
LMAO

Brubaker 0
Razorcut 2

:windup:

Bruise Brubaker
09-23-2005, 09:15 PM
You're stating that "None of these essential neuropeptides are associated with the opioid system." to show that peptides can't have an opioid effect. What does it have to do with ingested peptides having an opioid effect?

ectx
09-23-2005, 09:43 PM
You're stating that "None of these essential neuropeptides are associated with the opioid system." to show that peptides can't have an opioid effect. What does it have to do with ingested peptides having an opioid effect?

*looks for the word "ingested peptides" in razorcut's post...nope can't find it*

He said neuropeptides...huge difference. Now go google it.

Bruise Brubaker
09-23-2005, 10:13 PM
Well if I understand well, alpha gliadin is by definition a neuropeptide? I don't understand what it has to do with the neuropeptides essential for the hunger control.

Bruise Brubaker
09-23-2005, 10:16 PM
Effect of two synthetic alpha-gliadin peptides on lymphocytes in celiac disease: identification of a novel class of opioid receptors.

Graf L, Horvath K, Walcz E, Berzetei I, Burnier J.

Two synthetic peptides containing residues 43-47 and 43-49 of alpha-gliadin were tested for inhibition of leukocyte migration in 47 patients with celiac disease. In nineteen patients, all on a normal diet, leukocyte migration was inhibited by the peptides and naloxone blocked this effect. In twenty-eight patients (24 of whom were on strict gluten-free diet) leukocyte migration was not affected by the peptides. Our results suggest that alpha-gliadin-(43-49), Tyr-Pro-Gln-Pro-Gln-Pro-Phe, is closely related to the active fragment, or to one of the active fragments of alpha-gliadin, and that it interacts with receptors that are similar to but not identical with the known opiate receptors.

ectx
09-23-2005, 10:46 PM
Are you kidding? I (capital I) talked about ingested peptides, then (that means LATER) he replied with something about neuropeptides...

Yes, but he was referring to neuropeptides exclusively...not in reference to your post. You have a lot to learn about neurophysiology. So do I for that matter, but I do understand the relevance of neuropeptides to the argument. Now go google it!

ectx
09-23-2005, 10:54 PM
*edit* Okay, so you googled some, but you're on the wrong track...hint:

Neuropeptides: numerous naturally occurring endogenous peptides which act as neurotransmitters, neuromodulators, or trophic factors, to mediate nervous system functions. Increasing numbers of non-peptide ligands of neuropeptide receptors have been developed, which act as agonists or antagonists in peptidergic systems.

further hint on the role of neuropeptides (notice, these aren't things you digest, these are things that occur naturally and play an important role in a variety of neural activity)

Click here for the pubmed abstract below. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=12801597&dopt=Abstract)

here's the abstract for the review

Lateral hypothalamic neuropeptides in reward and drug addiction.

DiLeone RJ, Georgescu D, Nestler EJ.

Department of Psychiatry and Center for Basic Neuroscience, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas 75390-9070, USA. ralph.dileone@utsouthwestern.edu

The hypothalamus has been long considered important in feeding and other motivated behaviors. The identification of neuropeptides expressed in the hypothalamus has initiated efforts to better elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms involved. The neuropeptides orexin and melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) are expressed in the lateral hypothalamus (LH) and have been implicated in regulation of feeding behavior. Neurons expressing these neuropeptides have extensive projections to regions of the brain important for behavioral responses to drugs of abuse, raising the possibility that the pathways may also be important in addiction. Regulation of LH intracellular signaling pathways in response to drugs of abuse supports a role for the LH neuropeptides in addiction.

sCaRz*Of*PaiN
09-24-2005, 02:13 AM
So how about that Adderall, eh?

Built
09-24-2005, 02:13 AM
LOL!

Eh?

sCaRz*Of*PaiN
09-24-2005, 02:16 AM
What? ;)