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kozen
10-24-2005, 07:48 PM
Hi,

I recently decided to switch to a vegeterian diet (long story), meaning i dont eat seafood, white meat, nor red meat. I am still consuming dairy products/cheeses/protein shakes, but i was wondering if anyone else who is in a similar position could offer me some alternative sources for protein? Thanks

malkore
10-24-2005, 08:20 PM
still eat eggs?

prolly eat some stuff like boca burgers, morning star brand stuff.

tigo
10-25-2005, 03:34 AM
tofu, soy, nuts, milk, cottage cheese, beans

waynis
10-25-2005, 06:41 PM
Soy will have to be a main protein source if your staying vegetarian. You can buy soy protein powders, soy burgers, ext. You can also try out hemp protein. Benifets of hemp it also contains EFA's. Here's a link http://www.globalhempstore.com/hemp-food/nutiva-hemp-protein-powder.html

otherwise you got your eggs, milk, cottage cheese, whey. for good sources of protein.

getfit
10-25-2005, 06:47 PM
^^ yep

Jorge Sanchez
10-25-2005, 07:58 PM
I knew a vegeterian who swore by veggi hotdogs. I was a little skeptical at first, but I checked them out in the gorcery store one day and they had about 11g of protein/dog. Although it is probably soy, and thus incomplete, protein.

Jorge Sanchez
10-25-2005, 07:59 PM
Congrats on the switch by the way. I have been considering it lately, but I think it would be extremely difficult to meet my caloric goals.

waynis
10-25-2005, 09:48 PM
I knew a vegeterian who swore by veggi hotdogs. I was a little skeptical at first, but I checked them out in the gorcery store one day and they had about 11g of protein/dog. Although it is probably soy, and thus incomplete, protein.

uhh.. i tried soy hotdogs once. Never again.. tasted like eating rubber.. ewww..

waynis
10-25-2005, 09:50 PM
Congrats on the switch by the way. I have been considering it lately, but I think it would be extremely difficult to meet my caloric goals.

nah actually all he has to do is bump up the healthy fats and proteins. If he does it right fats could supply a lot of his energy. Good way keep bf down.

getfit
10-26-2005, 01:52 AM
uhh.. i tried soy hotdogs once. Never again.. tasted like eating rubber.. ewww..
i agree, i prefer the burgers

ShockBoxer
10-26-2005, 09:32 AM
Thinking about not eating meat every day makes a part of me run screaming and curl into a fetal position.

Though I did consider becoming a vegetarian when I weighed 200... it lasted only until I walked into a food court and smelled Harvey's cooking burgers (I don't even like Harvey's). Now that I'm 167 and eating whatever the hell kind of meat I want whenever I want... well...

When I was considering I was seriously looking at soy. I still am as a supplement (I don't get enough protein usually). What do people mean when they say 'incomplete protein'?

anasthetic
10-26-2005, 06:53 PM
When I was considering I was seriously looking at soy. I still am as a supplement (I don't get enough protein usually). What do people mean when they say 'incomplete protein'?

Here is a post by Jeremy Likness on the JSF forums about this topic:

http://forums.johnstonefitness.com/showthread.php?t=20814&highlight=protein

Excerpt:
First, the definition of "complete protein" is really more subjective than you would think. Many foods labeled "incomplete" actually have all of the amino acids that "complete" proteins do, they just have lower levels of certain proteins.

The relevance is debatable.

For overall health, the composition of a given meal just doesn't matter. There's an old myth that you need a complete protein at every meal, but this simply isn't true. Even if you are low in certain amino acids, as long as you receive them elsewhere in your diet (i.e. beans for breakfast, rice for dinner) the body can manage. The World Health Organization has been studying this for decades to determine the most efficient way to provide the right proteins to famished third world countries. Your body has an amino acid pool that literally works like a bank with circulating amino acids and can draw and deposit as needed.

For building muscle, it depends on your goals.

You can build a very impressive physique and never have a complete protein at any meal ... again, provided you consume variety and get the full amino acid spectrum over time.

It does appear important, however, if your goal is maximum mass, to have complete proteins at every meal. There is no health need for this, and it certainly isn't required to gain or maintain muscle (I coach vegetarians all the time, and while I do eat meal, I have plenty of meals throughout the day that aren't "complete" proteins) ... but in my experience, the most impressive bodybuilding physiques are all people who focus on complete proteins at every meal. No, it's not scientific, but that is what I've observed and personally, I gained the most mass when I was consuming full proteins at every meal.

So, I say for those who are not looking to compete at an elite bodybuilding level not to worry so much. If you tolerate the proteins, great, then go for it, but for those who want a more vegan or vegetarian-style nutrition program, it's not the end of the world.

You'll definitely not want to place much weight on the so-called superiority of ceratin proteins over others because those only make sense if that's the only protein you're taking in. It's more of an advertising gimmick than anything else. Just because eggs are x percent and beef is y percent and a shake is z percent really doesn't mean much if you are eating all three thorughout the day.

Here are two great articles about protein, one that tackles it from an "exposing the myths" perspective, the other that actually deals with the science behind protein and not the hype and smoke and mirrors most people fall for because of the supplement industry's heavy advertising.

medulla-boy
03-26-2006, 11:13 AM
Few vegetarian protein sources:
as mentioned - soy products, especially tofu, but also soy milks and tempeh (which in my opinion tastes much better than tofu).
Flaxseeds, almonds, and hemp seeds have about 20% protein, although fatty, it's good fat. Almonds can be peeled and soaked for a few hours so their digestion is more efficient. Flaxseed can be ground and mixed in shakes or in sauces.
Seaweed - although an acquired taste - also have a large percentage of protein - can be eaten as a salad (especially meaty seaweeds like kombu).
Bee pollen- can be quite expensive but worth it. Also about 20% and contain many vitamins and minerals as well and very easily absorbed.
Spirulina- again not the cheapest source but could be the healthiest. about 60% of protein.
Also to consider: legums (especially peas and beans) , wheat-protein products (usually Japanese) and of course eggs and dairy if you are vegetarian. Leafy greens, mushrooms and sprouts also have protein in them, often ignored, but certainly not enough to have them as the basis for protein.

Optimum08
03-26-2006, 12:01 PM
as long as your going vegetarian and not vegan you should find plenty of sufficient sources of protein...including dairy products, your whey/protein blend shakes, and soy. Now if you were going vegan that would be completely different. i would basically die if i didn't eat meat...i mean im a KC barbeque kinda guy myself.

Mr. D
03-26-2006, 12:08 PM
I am vegetarian and this is what i eat for protein:

Whey Shakes
Cottage Cheese
Fat Free Cheeses
Tofu (I dont eat more than 25g of soy a day)
Wheat Gluten (Seitan)
Beans and Legumes
Nonfat Yogurt
Skim Milk
Nuts

I dont eat eggs, but if you do I would make that a large part of your diet as their BV value is great. 1 yolk for every 3 egg whites (hard boiled)

Broccoli and Spinach have decent amounts of protein too.

getfit
03-26-2006, 12:41 PM
I am vegetarian and this is what i eat for protein:

Whey Shakes
Cottage Cheese
Fat Free Cheeses
Tofu (I dont eat more than 25g of soy a day)
Wheat Gluten (Seitan)
Beans and Legumes
Nonfat Yogurt
Skim Milk
Nuts

I dont eat eggs, but if you do I would make that a large part of your diet as their BV value is great. 1 yolk for every 3 egg whites (hard boiled)

Broccoli and Spinach have decent amounts of protein too.
pretty much the same what i eat, but i do eat eggs, and drink 2% milk

Holto
03-26-2006, 12:59 PM
Although it is probably soy, and thus incomplete, protein.

The only incomplete protein is gelatin. Soy is actually the most *balanced* protein in nature. Something like rice or pea protein is technically complete because it has all 8 essential amino acids. The reason it is misnamed incomplete is because it has a limited amount of one or more EAA's. There are products that combine rice and pea (interactive) to make the AA profile more balanced.

So with that, soy and hemp powders a vegetarian can easily be a bodybuilder.

Shao-LiN
03-26-2006, 02:26 PM
If some people are so worried about "incomplete protein", then the easiest solution is to vary your protein sources. Problem solved.

dissipate
03-26-2006, 05:54 PM
you can also check out TheGimp's journal in journal land.. he's a vegetarian too.